High-Level Symposium on
Nanotechnology Safety
“Nanotechnology safety is no small task”
29-30 November 2010
Institute of Experimental Medicine AS CR
Vídeňská 1083, Prague Krč
Organisers:
The Institute of Experimental Medicine of the Czech Academy of Sciences
The British Embassy in Prague
The Science and Innovation Network of the UK Government
The Institute of Occupational Medicine, Edinburgh
The Institute for Work and Health in Lausanne
The European Network on the Health and Environmental Impact of Nanomaterials NanoImpactNet
Sponsors:
The European Network on the Health and
Environmental Impact of Nanomaterials
NANOIMPACTNET PRESS RELEASE
Monday, 8 November 2010
For immediate release
“Nanotechnology safety is no small task”
A high-level symposium in Prague on nanotechnology safety
NanoImpactNet – the European network on the health and environmental impact of
nanomaterials – together with the British Embassy in Prague, Science and Innovation
Network of the UK Government, the Institute of Occupational Medicine in Edinburgh,
and the Institute for Work and Health in Lausanne, are organising a high-level meeting
on nanotechnology safety. Top policy makers and scientists from 16 countries
including the United Kingdom, France, Germany, the Czech Republic, and the USA will
meet in Prague, 29-30 November 2010, at the Academy of Sciences of the Czech
Republic.
Nanotechnologies are developing apace, yet assessing and managing the potential risks
posed by manufactured nanomaterials are relatively new themes. Because well known
substances display different physical and chemical properties at the nano scale, the nano
prefix has had to be added to the fields of toxicology, ecotoxicology, and exposure and risk
assessment. The speakers at the symposium will portray their areas of expertise in light of
the specific complexity and uncertainty which nanotechnolgies bring.
With the support of the British Embassy in Prague, the city’s Institute for Experimental
Medicine and the European Commission’s NanoSafety Cluster of research projects, the
organisers are offering delegates the opportunity to focus on the transatlantic dimensions to
nanotechnology safety. Dr Sally Tinkle will explain how the US National Nanotechnology
Coordination Office is creating a strategic approach to the minimisation of uncertainty and
complexity in nanotechnology safety research, and Dr Phil Sayres will detail the US
Environmental Protection Agency’s experience in assessing the risk of manufactured
nanomaterials.
Making nanotechnologies safe for stakeholders everywhere
High-level presentations from the European Commission and its Joint Research Centre, as
well as from numerous esteemed researchers from European universities and laboratories
will be supplemented by talks from the World Health Organisation and UNITAR.
Representatives of industry will explain the complex matters they have to deal with in
nanotechnology safety research, and Dr Wolf-Michael Catenhusen, Head of German NanoCommission, will present Germany’s national dialogue on nanosafety and the views of the
most important stakeholders in the area of safe nanotechnology development – citizenconsumers.
The analysis and management of the risks posed by a manufactured nanomaterial must
cover its entire life cycle, from production (when workers may face significant contact with
new nano-enhanced goods), through use (when consumers take advantage of nanobenefits), to elimination (somewhere in our environment). Nothing can be taken for granted
when it comes to nano-safety.
Synergies for safety
NanoImpactNet and the NanoSafety Cluster share the missions of maximising synergies,
communication, information sharing, coordination and consensus building in European
nanotechnology safety. After the final presentation, the delegates will take time to discuss
and integrate ideas on how best to address the complexities and uncertainties of
nanotechnology safety. Their goal will be to close the symposium with a consensus opinion
on how to advance this difficult and challenging area.
“This symposium will be a fantastic opportunity for the experts to discuss nanotechnology
safety in the presence of policy makers”, says conference co-organiser Dr Michael Riediker.
“NanoImpactNet and the EC’s NanoSafety Cluster help ensure that EU legislation really is
supported by scientific facts and consensus opinions.”
CONTACTS
Dr PD Michael Riediker
Institute for Work and Health, Lausanne, Switzerland
NanoImpactNet Coordinator
(+41) 21 314 7453
Email: [email protected]
Dr Otakar Fojt
Science and Innovation Network, British Embassy, Prague, Czech Republic
Senior Science and Innovation Advisor
(+420) 737 289 545
Email: [email protected]
Dr Lang Tran
Institute of Occupational Medicine, Edinburgh, United Kingdom
Head of Toxicology Section
(+44) 131 449 8050
Email: [email protected]
FURTHER INFORMATION
http://www.nanoimpactnet.eu
http://www.nanosafetycluster.eu
Darren Hart, Communications Officer – Industry, Government & Civil Society
NanoImpactNet, Institute for Work and Health, Rue du Bugnon 21, CH-1011 Lausanne, Switzerland
Tel: +41 21 314 7249 - [email protected] - www.nanoimpactnet.eu
High-Level Symposium on Nanotechnology Safety
Final Programme
29 November 2010 - Morning
8:30
Arrival and registration
9:00
Opening session
Facilitator: Dr. Otakar Fojt, Senior Science and Innovation Adviser, British Embassy, Prague
09:00 –
09:10
H.E.
Sian
MacLeod
Welcome by the British Ambassador to the Czech
Republic
09:10 –
09:20
Prof.
Eva
Syková
Welcome by the Director of the Institute of
Experimental Medicine of the Academy of Sciences
09:20 –
09:35
Dr.
Michael
Riediker
09:35 –
09:50
Dr.
Lang
Tran
09:50 –
10:05
Prof.
Geoffrey
Hunt
10:10
Chair:
10:10 –
10:25
10:25 –
10:40
10:40 –
10:55
10:55 –
11:10
Strategies to address Complexity and Uncertainty about
the Health and Environmental Impact of
Nanomaterials
The European Research Programmes on Risk
Assessment and Risk Management of Engineered
Nanoparticles
Nanoparticles, complexity and safety: Is a new
paradigm needed?
Session 1
Dr. Radim Šrám
Creating Strategic Focus to Minimize Uncertainty and
Complexity in Nanotechnology Safety Research
"Engineered nanoparticle risk assessment and cell
toxicity (working titled)
Dr.
Sally
Tinkle
Prof.
Vicki
Stone
Dr.
Jan
Topinka
Genotoxicity of combustion generated nanoparticles
Prof.
Bengt
Fadeel
Comprehensive Assessment of Hazardous Effects of
Engineered Nanomaterials on the Immune System
11:15 – 11:35 Coffee break
11:40
Chair:
11:40 –
11:55
11:55 –
12:10
Session 2
Dr. Lang Tran
Dr.
Maria
Dušínská
Prof.
Hakan
Wallin
12:10 –
12:25
Prof.
Juergen
Pauluhn
12:25 –
12:40
Prof.
Eva
Syková
Nanomaterial safety. Do we have testing strategy?
Proper hazard identification of CNT and other
nanomaterials
Integration of Experimental Evidence from Multiwalled
Carbon Nanotubes and other submicronsized Granular
Biopersistent Materials
Nanoparticles and nanofibers in regenerative medicine
12:40 – 14:30 Lunch
29 November 2010 - Afternoon
14:30
Chair:
Session 3
Dr. Michael Riediker
14:30 –
14:45
Dr.
Wolf-Michael
Catenhusen
14:45 –
15:00
Dr.
Georgios
Katalagarianakis
Dr.
Phil
Sayres
Prof.
Georg
Karlaganis
Complexity of Nanoregulations
Dr.
Daniel
Bloch
Dealing with complexity and uncertainty in occupational
health in context of the precautionary principle
15:00 –
15:15
15:15 –
15:30
15:30 –
15:45
National Stakerholder-Dialogue on NanoSafety in
Germany
Complexity theory and practice, addressing complex
interactions and tight coupling in safety of
nanotechnology
EPA Experiences with Assessing the Risks of Industrial
Nanomaterials
15:50 – 16:10 Coffee break
16:15
Chair:
16:15 –
16:30
16:30 –
16:45
16:45 –
17:00
Session 4
Prof. Bengt Fadeel
Dr.
Marco
Martuzzi
Risk governance of nanotechnology and health: views
from WHO
Dr.
Barry
Parks
Nanosafety - A UK Industry View
Prof.
Terry
Wilkins
Can we learn from Industry for dealing with the
complexity of safety issues for nanomaterials
17:00 –
17:15
Dr.
Christoph
Klein
Policy support on nanotechnology
17:15 –
17:30
Dr.
Joanna
Seiffert
Complexity and uncertainty in nanometrology: the need
for standardisation in nanoparticle safety testing
17:30 – 18:30 Poster Session
30 November 2010 - Morning
09:00
Chair:
Session 5
Dr. Daniel Bloch
09:00 –
09:15
Prof.
Pavel
Danihelka
Overview of nanosafety in the Czech Republic
09:15 –
09:30
Prof.
Mark
Wiesner
CEINT: An interdisciplinary roadmap towards
understanding the environmental implications of
nanotechnologies
09:30 –
09:45
Dr.
Ernst
Furrer
Environmental governance of nanomaterials
09:45 –
10:00
Dr.
Maria
Soccoro Vazquez
Monitoring of nanomaterials properties along their life
cycle as nanofillers of polymeric nanocomposites
Dr.
Antonio
Pietrouisti
Managing SWCNT in "in vivo" experiments
10:00 –
10:15
10:15 –
10:30
Plenary Discussion
10:30 – 10:50 Coffee break
10:55
Chair:
10:55 –
11:10
11:10 –
11:25
11:25 –
11:40
11:40 –
11:55
11:55 –
12:10
12:10 –
12:30
Session 6
Dr. Maria Dušínská
Dr.
Iseult
Lynch
Nanoparticle irreproducibility coupled to protein corona
complexity leads to uncertainty for nanosafety
assessment
Dr.
Elzbieta
Jankowska
Characterisation of exposure to nanoparticles
Prof.
Kai
Savolainen
Prof.
Francelyne
Marano
Prof.
Peter
Gehr
'Engineered nanomaterials and occupational exposure
limits
Nanoparticles induction of inflammatory response need
multiparametric evaluation
Nanoparticles can enter the human organism and may
cause health effects – a complex problem creating a lot
of uncertainty
Plenary Discussion
12:30 – 14:30 Lunch
30 November 2010 - Afternoon
14:30
Chair:
14:30 –
15:45
Integration session
Prof. Geoffrey Hunt
Round 1 of discussion session: Complexity and Uncertainty
15:50 – 16:10 Coffee break
16:10 –
17:10
Round 2 of discussion session: Complexity and Uncertainty
17:10 –
17:30
Conclusions
Meeting topic: Complexity and Uncertainty
In this meeting, we address the question how do we or should we approach issues of complexity and uncertainty in our
field? To avoid lack of clarity about the definition of complexity and uncertainty, we have defined these
two terms for the purpose of the Symposium as follows:
Complexity: complexity refers to the state of many elements in a system and many forms of relationships
among those elements. (One may often distinguish between organised and disorganised complexity.) The
complexity of a specific system is the degree of difficulty in predicting the properties of the system if the
properties of the system's parts are given. A particular feature of some complex system, relevant to
nanotoxicology, is the emergence of novel properties at one or more levels of complexity - properties that
may not be predictable from the data of the lower level. Thus complexity and uncertainty may sometimes
be linked.
Uncertainty: Uncertainty is a situation, different from quantifiable risk, in which there is some difficulty
of fact or method (whether lack of data, insufficiency of data, or poor quality of data) or some difficulty or
impossibility in principle of establishing data in order to quantify risk. Uncertainty is the state of having
knowledge that is limited in some way (there are several ways) that makes it impossible adequately to
describe an existing condition or future outcome. A deeper level of uncertainty is not knowing why it is
that one has a state of uncertainty e.g. is it merely a lack of sufficient quantity of data? Probabilistic
approaches are often relevant to measurement in situations of uncertainty.
Scientific Posters
1
David Rickerby, Rudolf Reuther, Eleanor O'Rourke, Mark Morrison
Developing innovative solutions for the sustainable design, use, recycling and final treatment of
nanotechnology based products
2
Tanja Wildemann, Darinka Djordjevic, Richard Canady
ILSI Initiatives on Nanotechnology
3
M. Rakonjac, A. Kunzmann, C. Zhou, K. Hultenby, A. E. Garcia-Bennett, B. Fadeel
Novel folic acid-templated mesoporous silica particles: biocompatibility and cellular uptake
4
Sonja Boland, Sandra Vranic, Rina Guadagnini, Kevin Moreau, Francelyne Marano, Armelle Baeza
Comparison of the cytotoxicity of different engineered nanoparticles in lung epithelial cells: role
of physico-chemical characteristics
5
A. Marcomini, G. Pojana, D. Bilanicova, A. Brunelli, S. Gottardo, D. Hristozov, A. Critto, L. Tran
Risk-oriented characterization of engineered nanoparticles
6
Sonja Boland, Rina Guadagnini, Sandra Vranic, Kevin Moreau, Armelle Baeza, Francelyne Marano
Interaction of nanoparticles used in medical applications with lung epithelial cells: uptake,
cytotoxicity, oxidative stress and pro-inflammatory responses
7
M. Riediker, N. Boschung, D. Hart and the NanoImpactNet-Team
NanoImpactNet – scientific cooperation and dialogue between researchers and stakeholders in
the health and environmental impact of nanomaterials
8
Malgorzata Cieslak, Maciej Stepnik, Joanna Arkusz, Wojciech Wasowicz
Comparative Assessment of Photocatalytic Nanomodifier and Fibres
9
Bozena Novotná, Miroslava Kapcalová, Pavel Rössner Jr., Karolina Turnovcová, Yana Bagryantseva,
Pavla Jendelová, Eva Syková
Oxidative damage to biological macromolecules in human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells
labelled with various types of iron oxide nanoparticles
10
Helena Líbalová, Kateřina Hanzalová, Alena Milcová, Jana Schmuczerová, Radim J. Šrám, Jan Topinka
Genotoxicity and gene expression profiles of organic extracts from the air particles measured in
human cell lines
11
Jan Topinka, Jan Hovorka, A. Milcová, J. Schmuczerová, J. Krouţek, P. Rossner Jr., Radim J. Šrám
An acellular assay to assess the genotoxicity of organic pollutants bound on size segregated
aerosol
12
M. Vojtěšek, P. Mikuška, R. Ličbinský, V. Adamec and K. Křůmal
Spatial and seasonal variations of concentrations of metals in particulate matter and street dust in
the Czech Republic
13
P. Mikuška, K. Křůmal, M. Vojtěšek, and Z. Večeřa
Seasonal variations of concentrations of monosaccharide anhydrides in PM1 and PM2.5 aerosol
14
Vladimír Ţdímal
Number and mass size distribution of atmospheric aerosol in various environments in the CR
15
J. Kukutschová, J. Dvořáčková, P. Moravec, P. Komínek, K. Zeleník, H. Bielniková, P. Filip
Nano-particulate emissions from road traffic and their potential health impact
16
Michal Vojtíšek
Measurement of nanoparticles emitted by internal combustion engines during real-world urban
operation
17
Pavel Pokorný, David Lukáš, Petr Mikeš
Generation of X-rays and deposition of radon progeny driven by electrospinning
18
Miroslav Černík, Alena Ševců
Engineered zero-valent iron nanoparticles: Should bacteria care?
19
A. Horna, O. Zitka, V. Adam, L. Trnkova, R. Kizek
Two Biological Applications of Carbon Working Electrodes
20
Jitka Kubatova
EU Project NanoCode
21
Jiří Krouţek, Jan Hovorka, Jan Topinka
PAH in size segregated aerosol: seasonal and inter-site variability
22
Eva Zemanova, Karel Klouda, Karel Zeman
Fulleren C60 derivative by peracetic acid has radioprotective and nontoxic properties in vivo
Commercial Posters
23
Joanna Seiffert and Jane Firth
Reference materials to support nanoparticle toxicity testing
24
David Hall
Particle Measuring Systems
25
Ladislav Torcik
Nanoadditive for fuels
26
Marcela Rupova
Occupational Safety Research Institute
27
Petra Rouckova
CzechInvest
SYMPOSIUM INFORMATION
Symposium Venue
Institute of Molecular Genetics AS CR, v.v.i., Vídeňská 1083, 142 20 Prague 4-Krč, Czech
Republic
Connection: Metro line C to the station Budějovická then bus number 193 to the end station
Ústavy Akademie věd.
Official Symposium language
Official Symposium language is English, there will be no simultaneous translation provided.
Registration
Registration desk is located inside the new building of the Institute of Molecular Genetics.
All documents including registration packs (symposium bag, personal badge, final programme,
list of participants, list of posters) will be handed out to registered participants during the
following opening hours:
Monday
November 29, 2010 08:00-18:00
Tuesday
November 30, 2010 08:00-12:00
Badges
Acces to all events will only be possible with your personal badge which you will receive at the
registration desk. Please always wear your badge. Lost badges will only be replaced with proof of
your registration. You are kindly requested to leave the badge behind at the end of the Symposium.
Internet access
Open wireless network (web and e-mail) will be available for all Symposium participants
throughout the venue (no password required). The network name is: FreeWifiRadio-IMG.
Guidelines for Symposium Speakers
Speakers are requested to hand in a copy of their presentation (on USB stick or CD/DVD
media) a minimum of 2 hours before the start of their session to the staff at the registration desk,
who will ensure loading of the presentation into the projection system.
The computer used for projection is PC with Windows XP, PowerPoint 2007. Please, make sure
that your presentantion is PC-compatible. Do not forget to bring the movies used in the
presentation in separate files (not only the *.ppt or *.pptx file).
In order to keep up with the Symposium schedule and avoid unnecessary delays when swapping
speakers it is NOT possible to use your own laptop for the projection.
Slide preview room / Speakers’ preview
Speaker‘s preview room is located next to the registration area of the venue.
Poster presentation
Posters will be located in the entrance hall of the Institute of Molecular Genetics Installation
time: Monday, November 29, 2010 from 8:00.
Coffee breaks
From Monday to Tuesday, coffee breaks will be served in the exhibition and poster area.
Responsibility
The participant acknowledges that he/she has no right to lodge damage claims against the
organisers should the holding of the Symposium be hindered or prevented by unexpected
political or economic events or generally by force majeure, or should the non-appearance of
speakers or other reasons necessitate programme changes. With registration, the participant
accepts this proviso.
Health insurance
The Symposium organisers cannot accept liability for personal injuries sustained, or for loss or
damage of property belonging to Symposium articipants, either during or as result of
symposium. Please, check validity of your health insurance.
Transportation from the airport to the hotels
The best way is to take a taxi. We strongly recommend to use AAA taxi service, located in front
of the arival hall of the airport. By public transport:
- Hotel Panorama, red metro line C, station „Pankrác“
- Hotel Barcelo, red metro line C, station „Budějovická“ (exit north), then the bus No.124
(1 stop)
- Rezidence Emmy, red metro line C, station „Kačerov“, then the bus No. 114 or 272 to
IKEM stop (5 stops)
Transportation from the airport to the Symposium venue (duration 1 hour)
The best way is to take a taxi. We strongly recommend to use AAA taxi service, located in front
of the arival hall of the airport. By public transport:
- from the airport take bus 119 to the terminal station „Dejvická“
- take the green metro line A to station „Muzeum“ and change to the red metro line C
(destination „Háje“)
- get off at the station „Budějovická“ (exit south (Poliklinika)
- take the bus 193 to the terminal station „Ústavy akademie věd“ and follow the signs to the
Institute of Molecular Genetics of Academy of Sciences.
Transportation from the hotels to the Symposium Venue
- From Hotel Panorama - red metro line C, station „Budějovická“ (exit south –Poliklinika), then the
bus 193 to the terminal station „Ústavy akademie věd“ and follow the signs to the Institute of
Molecular Genetics of Academy of Sciences.
- From Hotel Barcelo - take the bus 193 to the terminal station „Ústavy akademie věd“ and follow
the signs to the Institute of Molecular Genetics of Academy of Sciences.
- From Rezidence Emmy – it is 5 min by foot or take the bus 193 to the terminal station „Ústavy
akademie věd“ and follow the signs to the Institute of Molecular Genetics of Academy of
Sciences.
USEFUL INFORMATION ON PRAGUE
City of Prague
Prague, the capital city of the Czech Republic, situated in the heart of Europe ranks amongst the
most impressive historical cities in the world. Prague was established as a town when Prague
Castle was built in 870. In the 11th century, the first Czech king, Vratislav I, chose Prague as his
capital. The city has always played an important part in the history of the nation, country and
Europe. Since medieval times, Prague has been distinguished as one of the most beautiful cities
in the world. Prague is not only a centre of cultural movements dating back for centuries (Art
from every period in history can be found here), it also exhibits a unique collection of historical
monuments, dominated by Prague Castle. Prague occupies both banks of the Vltava River and
consists of 6 districts: the Old Town, which includes Josefov (the Jewish Quarter, which remains
intact despite World War II), New Town, Lower Town, Hradcany and Vysehrad. These districts
house the majority of historical landmarks, museums and galleries. Charles University founded in
1348 is one of the oldest universities in Europe. In 1992, the historical core of the city (866
hectares) was listed in the UNESCO World Cultural and Natural Heritage Register as a town
with a unique and lively blend of Roman, Gothic, Renaissance, Baroque, Art Nouveau and
Cubist architecture. Prague was one of nine European cities awarded the title European City of
Culture in 2000. Prague has around 1.2 million inhabitants. For more information, visit the
website www.pis.cz.
Climate
Prague is a city with a continental climate. At the end of November the average temperature
varies between 00C and 100C.
Currency
The official curence in the Czech Republic is the Czech Crown (CZK/Kč). Coins: 1, 2, 5, 10, 20,
50 crowns. Bank notes: 50, 100, 200, 500, 1000, 2000 and 5000 crowns. Exchanges offices and
ATM are easily available throughout the town and at Prague Internaitonal Airport. The
approximable exchange rate is: EUR = 24.6 CZK, USD = 17.9 CZK (November 12, 2010). For
up-to-date exchange rates please visit www.cnb.cz.
Restaurants
Czech cuisine is typical of Middle European gastronomy, yet clearly reflects a number of Czech
elements – e.g. bread of fruit dumplings, various kinds of soups, sauces, numerous potato dishes,
cakes and a wide range of festive dishes. In general, Czech gastronomy means roasted pork with
dumplings and sauerkraut, potato pancakes, plum dumplings and bilberry cakes... and, of course,
Czech drinks – primarily beer and first-rate wines from South Moravia, not to mention
„Slivovice“, a clear Czech plum brandy and „Becherovka“, a delicious herbal elixir with
legendary aphrodisiac qualities. People usually have lunch between 12:00 and 14:00, sit down for
dinner between 18:00 and 21:00. However, it is possible to dine throughout the whole day and
every visitor´s need can be met.
Taxi
When taking a taxi, be sure that the taxi is equipped with a permanently installed yellow roof
lamp with the TAXI sign in black letters. The registration number, company name and the price
list including the basic rate, rate per kilometer and one-minute-waiting rate must be displayed on
both front doors of the cab. Taxis are easy to hail from the street in the city centre, however we
recommend using hotel taxis or obtain taxis by phone through the radio taxi service, e.g. AAA
((+ 420) 14 014), City taxi ((+420) 257 257 257) and ask for the approximate price in advance.
Although Euros are to be accepted by almost all taxi services, paying by Czech Crowns is safer.
Upon arrival to Prague by plane we strongly recommend to use AAA taxi service, located at the
arrival hall.
Transportation in Prague
Prague has very well developed net of public transport. Any place in the city could be reached by
underground (metro), trams and buses.
Underground (Metro):
There are three underground lines (green – A, yellow – B, red – C) connecting all parts of
Prague, all going through the city centre. The Metro operates daily from 5:00 to 24:00. We
recommend that you use this kind of transport as the fastest and cheapest form of moving
around the city.
Tram and buses: Trams connect especially city centre, which buses cannot access. Daytime
operation is from 4:30 to 00:30. Night time operation is from 00:30 to 4:30 and is provided by
tram numbers 51 to 58 with traffic intervals 30 minutes. The daytime and night time operation of
buses is similar to tram operation. Night time service is provided by bus numbers 501 to 514.
Bus schedules are located at individual stops.
Public transport tickets:
Passengers may travel by means o public transport with a valid ticket only. (Ticket is valid only if
marked in the validating machine.) Tickets for individual trips can be purchased in Metro
stations, newsagents, hotels, in the automated sales network, in Information Centres of the
Prague Public Transport Company, from drivers of periphery bus routes, or from bus drivers of
city bus routes. In the interests of smooth passenger service, it is necessary for the passenger to
have cash prepared in the amount of the price of the tickets being purchased, or reasonable
banknotes up to a denomination of CZK 100 or according to the price of tickets, or pre-counted
coins.
Ticket vending machines are installed at all metro stations and at surface transport stops and are
designed for the purchase of single tickets. Public transport tickets are valid for all three means
of transport. Transfer ticket costs 26,- Kc (discounted children 6 to 15 13,- Kc), non transfer
ticket costs 18,- Kc (discounted children 6 to 15 - 9,- Kc). The ticket is valid for 75 minutes after
marking. During off-peak hours, i.e. 8 p.m. to 5 a.m. on working days and all day Saturdays and
Sundays ticket validity is lengthened to 90 minutes. In trams and buses a non transfer ticket is
valid for 20 minutes after marking and does not allow changing of lines. In the underground the
nontransfer ticket is valid for 5 stations after marking (excluding the starting station) and allows
transfers between the underground lines.
Symposium Delegates
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44
45
46
47
48
49
50
51
52
53
54
55
56
57
58
59
Name
Dr. Rob Aitken
Dr. Frank Barry
Dr. Damien Becq
Mr. Petr Beneš
Mr. Robert Bennett
Dr. Elena Beskid
Dr. Daniel Bloch
Dr. Gaby Bloem
Dr. Sonja Boland
Dr. Ivana Borkovcová
Ms. Junona Böswartová
Prof. Martin Braniš
Dr. Thomas Brock
Dr. Flemming R. Cassee
Dr. Marcello G. Cacace
Dr. Wolf-Michael Catenhusen
Dr. Malgorzata Cieślak
Dr. Rostislav Čihák
Dr. Patrick Cheene
Dr. Robert Chlebiš
Dr. Petr Cígler
Dr. Miroslav Černík
Prof. Pavel Danihelka
Dr. Maria Dušínská
Mr. Jakub Dvořáček
Dr. Jana Dvořáčková
Prof. Bengt Fadeel
Prof. Teresa Fernandes
Dr. Lise Marie Fjellsbø
Dr. Otakar Fojt
Dr. Anna Fučíková
Dr. Ernst Furrer
Prof. Peter Gehr
Dr. Peter Görner
Dr. Rainer Hagenbeck
Dr. David Hall
Dr. Aleš Horna
Dr. Jan Hovorka
Dr. Eduard Hulicius
Prof. Geoffrey Hunt
Bc. Jiří Hynčica
Dr. Elzbieta Jankowska
Ing. Jaroslav Jareš
Dr. Pavla Jendelová
Dr. Erik J. Joner
Dr. Marie Kalbačová
Prof. Georg Karlaganis
Dr. Georgios Katalagarianakis
Dr. Christoph Klein
Dr. Karel Klouda
Dr. Klára Kobeticová
Dr. Eva Košťáková
Dr. Bohumil Kotlík
Ing. Jiří Krouţek
Dr. Václava Křečková
Dr. Jitka Kubatova
Dr. Hana Kubátová
Dr. Jana Kukutschová
Dr. Libor Kvítek
Company, Country
Institute of Occupational Medicine, U.K.
?, U.K.
mynano, France
Intitute of Chemical Technology, Czech Republic
Technesium TC (Reg. TM), U.K.
Institute of Experimental Medicine, Czech Republic
CEA, France
British Embassy Bern, U.K.
Université Paris Diderot-Paris, France
Veterinary University Brno, Czech Republic
Výzkumný ústav bezpečnosti práce, Czech Republic
Charles University, Czech Republic
BG RCI, Germany
Centre for Environmental Health, Netherlands
EC DG Research, Italy
German Nano-Comission, Germany
Textile Institute in Łodz, Poland
Centre of Ecology, Toxicology and Analytics, Czech Republic
mynano, France
Czech Technology Platform for Industrial Safety, Czech Republic
Institute of Organic Chemistry and Biochemistry, Czech Republic
Technical University of Liberec, Czech Republic
Technology Platform of Industrial Safety, Czech Republic
NILU, Norway
CzechInvest, Czech Republic
Faculty Hospital Ostrava, Czech Republic
Karolinska Institut, Sweden
Edinburgh Napier University, U.K.
Norwegian Institute for Air Research, Norway
British Embassy Prague, Czech Republic
Charles University, Czech Republic
Federal office for the environment FOEN, Switzerland
University of Bern, Switzerland
INRS, France
Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, Germany
Particle Measuring Systems Inc., U.K.
Tomas Bata University in Zlín, Czech Republic
CESNET, Czech Republic
Institute of Physics AS CR, Czech Republic
SMUC, U.K.
Faculty Hospital Ostrava, Czech Republic
Central Institute for Labour Protection, Poland
National Institute of Public Health, Czech Republic
Institute of Experimental Medicine, Czech Republic
Bioforsk Soil & Environment, Norway
Charles University, Czech Republic
UN Institute for Training and Research, Switzerland
EC, Pan-EU
JRC, Pan-EU
State Office for Nuclear Safety, Czech Republic
Centre of Ecology, Toxicology and Analytics, Czech Republic
Technical University Liberec, Czech Republic
National Institute of Public Health, Czech Republic
Charles University, Czech Republic
National Institute of Public Health, Czech Republic
Technology Centre ASCR, Czech Republic
State Office for Nuclear Safety, Czech Republic
Technical University Ostrava, Czech Republic
Palacky University Olomouc, Czech Republic
E-mail
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
60
61
62
63
64
65
66
67
68
69
70
71
72
73
74
75
76
77
78
79
80
81
82
83
84
85
86
87
88
89
90
91
92
93
94
95
96
97
98
99
100
101
102
103
104
105
106
107
108
109
110
111
112
113
114
115
116
117
118
119
120
121
122
123
Dr. Karel Lach
Dr. Helena Líbalová
Dr. Marta López
Dr. Petr Louda
Dr. David Lukáš
Prof. David Lukáš
Dr. Iseault Lynch
Dr. Jan Macák
Prof. Francelyne Marano
Prof. Antonio Marcomini
Dr. Marco Martuzzi
Mr. Vladimír Mička
Mr. Petr Mikeš
Dr. Pavel Mikuska
Dr. Alena Milcová
Dr. Jaroslav Mráz
Dr. Robert Muir
Ms. Marcela Munzarová
Dr. Andrew L. Nelson
Dr. František Němec
Ms. Lenka Neufussová
Dr. Dušan Nohavica
Dr. Boţena Novotná
Dr. Kamil Opletal
Dr. Aleš Panáček
Dr. Barry Park
Prof. Juergen Pauluhn
Dr. Martina Pavlová
Dr. Slava Pavlovets
Prof. Daniela Pelclová
Dr. Antonio Pietrouisti
Dr. Daniela Plachá
Dr. Claudia Pletscher
Mr. Kenan Poleo
MUDr. Václav Procházka
Ms. Janá Procházková
Dr. Marija Rakonjac
Dr. Jan Remsa
Dr. David Rickerby
Dr. Michael Riediker
Dr. Juan Riego Sintes
Dr. Bryony Ross
Dr. Pavel Rossner
Dr. Andrea Rossnerová
Ms. Petra Roučková
Ms. Marcela Rupová
Dr. Petr Ryšávka
Prof. Kai Savolainen
Dr. Phil Sayres
Dr. Jana Schmuczerová
Dr. Jochen Schulze-Aurich
Ms. Jana Seidlerová
Dr. Joanna Seiffert
Dr. Oksana Sevastyanova
Ms. Lucie Sikorová
Dr. Rachel Smith
Dr. Maria Soccoro Vazquez
Dr. Jana Soukupová
Dr. Tereza Sovová
Prof. Vicki Stone
Prof. Eva Syková
Dr. Helena Šebáková
Dr. Karolína Šišková
Prof. Radim Šram
Zdravotní ústav se sídlem v Ostravě, Czech Republic
Institute of Experimental Medicine, Czech Republic
NANOGAP SUB-NM-POWDER, Spain
Technical University Liberec, Czech Republic
Technical University of Liberec, Czech Republic
Technical University Liberec, Czech Republic
UCD, Ireland
Elmarco, Czech Republic
Université Paris Diderot-Paris, France
University of Venice, Italy
World Health Organization, Italy
Zdravotní ústav se sídlem v Ostravě, Czech Republic
Technical University Liberec, Czech Republic
Institute of Analytical Chemistry AS CR, Czech Republic
Institute of Experimental Medicine, Czech Republic
National Institute of Public Health, Czech Republic
Naneum, U.K.
Elmarco, Czech Republic
University of Leeds, U.K.
ENVItech Bohemia, Czech Republic
National Institute of Public Health, Czech Republic
Institute of Photonics and Electronics AS CR, Czech Republic
Institute of Experimental Medicine, Czech Republic
Mitsubishi Corporation, Czech Republic
Palacky University Olomouc, Czech Republic
Nanotechnology KTN, U.K.
Bayer Schering Pharma, Germany
Favea, Czech Republic
Yorkshire Bioscience Ltd , U.K.
Charles University, Czech Republic
Tor Vergata University, Italy
Technical University Ostrava, Czech Republic
Suva, Switzerland
British Embassy Berlin, U.K.
Faculty Hospital Ostrava, Czech Republic
Centre of research contracts, Czech Republic
Karolinska Institut, Sweden
Institute of Physics AS CR, Czech Republic
EC JRC, Italy
IST Lausanne, Switzerland
EU JRC, Italy
IOM, U.K.
Institute of Experimental Medicine, Czech Republic
Institute of Experimental Medicine, Czech Republic
CzechInvest, Czech Republic
Occupational Safety Research Institute, Czech Republic
Favea, Czech Republic
TTL, Finland
EPA, U.S.
Institute of Experimental Medicine, Czech Republic
Syngenta Crop Protection AG, Basel , Switzerland
Technical University Ostrava, Czech Republic
LGC, U.K.
Institute of Experimental Medicine, Czech Republic
Technical University Ostrava, Czech Republic
Health Protection Agency, U.K.
LEITAT, Spain
Palacky University Olomouc, Czech Republic
Institute of Chemical Technology, Czech Republic
Edinburgh Napier University, U.K.
Institute of Experimental Medicine, CAS, Czech Republic
Krajská hygienická stanice Ostrava, Czech Republic
Palacky University Olomouc, Czech Republic
Institute of Experimental Medicine, Czech Republic
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
jremsa@gmail.com
david.rickerby@jrc.ec.europa.eu
michael.riediker@hospvd.ch
juan.riego-sintes@ec.europa.eu
Bryony.Ross@iom-world.org
prossner@biomed.cas.cz
andrearo@biomed.cas.cz
petra.rouckova@czechinvest.org
rupova@vubp-praha.cz
Rysavka@favea.cz
Kai.Savolainen@ttl.fi
sayre.phil@epa.gov
schmucze@yahoo.com
jochen.schulze-aurich@syngenta.com
Jana.seidlerova@vsb.cz
Joanna.Seiffert@lgc.co.uk
sevastyanova@biomed.cas.cz
lucie.sikorka@seznam.cz
rachel.smith@hpa.org.uk
svazquez@leitat.org
j_soukupova@post.cz
Tereza.Sovova@vscht.cz
v.stone@napier.ac.uk
sykova@biomed.cas.cz
helena.sebakova@khsova.cz
karolina.siskova@upol.cz
sram@biomed.cas.cz
124
125
126
127
128
129
130
131
132
133
134
135
136
137
138
139
140
141
142
143
144
145
146
147
148
149
150
151
Dr. Lucie Štrajtová
Dr. Vlasta Švecová
Dr. Nana Tabashidze
Dr. Sally Tinkle
Dr. Jan Topinka
Mr. Ladislav Torčík
Dr. Lang Tran
Dr. Elena Tulupova
Dr. Monika Tvrdonova
Dr. Kateřina Uhlířová
Dr. Jana Večerková
Dr. Zbyněk Večeřa
RNDr. Kateřina Vítková
Dr. Michal Vojtíšek
Dr. Tomáš Vondrák
Prof. Lenka Vorlová
Prof. Hakan Wallin
Prof. Wojciech Wasowicz
Prof. Mark Wiesner
Dr. Tanja Wildemann
Prof. Terry Wilkins
Dr. Phil Woodhead
Mr. Jan Zábský
Mr. Lukáš Zavřel
Doc. Martina Zeleňáková
Mgr. Karel Zeman
Ing. Eva Zemanová
Dr. Vladimír Ţdímal
National Tissue Center Brno, Czech Republic
Institute of Experimental Medicine, Czech Republic
Institute of Experimental Medicine, Czech Republic
NIH-NIEHS, U.S.
Institute of Experimental Medicine, CAS, Czech Republic
Nanotrade, Czech Republic
IOM, U.K.
Institute of Experimental Medicine, Czech Republic
Institute of Organic Chemistry and Biochemistry, Czech Republic
Institute of Experimental Medicine, Czech Republic
Technical University Ostrava, Czech Republic
Inst. Analytical Chemistry AS CR, Czech Republic
Faculty Hospital Ostrava, Czech Republic
Technical University of Liberec, Czech Republic
Technology Centre ASCR, Czech Republic
Veterinary University Brno, Czech Republic
NERCWE, Denmark
Institute of Occupational Medicine in Lodz, Poland
Duke University, U.S.
ILSI Europe a.i.s.b.l., Belgium
University of Leeds, U.K.
Institute of Occupational Medicine, U.K.
BioTest s.r.o., Czech Republic
Výzkumný ústav bezpečnosti práce, Czech Republic
Technical University Košice, Slovakia
State Office for Nuclear Safety, Czech Republic
State Office for Nuclear Safety, Czech Republic
Institute of Chemical Process Fundamentals, Czech Republic
lucie.strajtova@natic.cz
svecova@biomed.cas.cz
jtopinka@biomed.cas.cz
stinkle@niehs.nih.gov
jtopinka@biomed.cas.cz
torcik@nanotrade.cz
lang.tran@iom-world.org
tulupova@biomed.cas.cz
tvrdonova@uochb.cas.cz
k.hanzalova@biomed.cas.cz
jana.vecerkova@vsb.cz
vecera@iach.cz
katerina.vitkova@fno.cz
michal.vojtisek@tul.cz
vondrak@tc.cz
vorloval@vfu.cz
hwa@arbejdsmiljoforskning.dk
wojciech@imp.lodz.pl
wiesner@duke.edu
twildemann@ilsieurope.be
t.a.wilkins@leeds.ac.uk
Phil.woodhead@iom-world.org
zabsky@biotest.eu
zavrel@vubp-praha.cz
martina.zelenakova@tuke.sk
karel.zeman@sujb.cz
Eva.Zemanova@sujb.cz
Zdimal@icpf.cas.cz
Download

High-Level Symposium on Nanotechnology Safety