CZECH
MUSIC
GUIDE
CZECH
MUSIC
GUIDE
Supported by
Ministry of Culture Czech Republic
© 2011 Arts and Theatre Institute
Second modified edition
First printing
ISBN 978-80-7008-269-0
No: 625
All rights reserved
CONTENT
ABOUT THE CZECH REPUBLIC
12
A SHORT HISTORY OF MUSIC
THE MIDDLE AGES (CA 850–1440)
THE RENAISSANCE
THE BAROQUE
CLASSICISM
ROMANTICISM/NATIONAL MUSIC
THE PERIOD 1890–1945
CZECH MUSIC AFTER 1945
THE SIXTIES/AVANT-GARDE, NEW MUSIC
THE SEVENTIES AND EIGHTIES
13
13
13
13
14
14
16
19
22
25
CONTEMPORARY MUSICAL LIFE
29
CURRENT CULTURE POLICY
37
MUSIC INSTITUTIONS
38
THE MUSIC EDUCATION SYSTEM
50
ARCHIVES, LIBRARIES, SCIENCE AND RESEARCH CENTRES
51
JOURNALS AND INFORMATION CENTRES
52
REGIONAL PANORAMA OF CZECH MUSIC CULTURE
53
LINKS (SELECTION)
66
EDITORIAL
NOTE
The Czech Music Guide presents an actual
panorama of contemporary Czech music life
with a short overview of history.
It has been produced for everyone who is
interested - from the specialist and scholarly to
the active and practical - to understand Czech
music culture and its milieu.
12
ABOUT CZECH REPUBLIC
CZECH MUSIC GUIDE
13
ABOUT
THE CZECH
REPUBLIC
The Czech Republic is a landlocked country with
a territory of 78 865 m2 lying in the centre of
Europe. The country has borders with Poland,
Germany, Austria and Slovakia, and is currently
divided into 14 regions. Since 2004 the CR has
been a member of the EU. At the end of 2009,
there were 10. 5 million people living in the CR
aged 0-14: ca. 1 488 thousand, 15-64: 7 425 thousand, 65+: 1 578 thousand. The capital is Prague
with a population of approximately 1 249 thousand. A resident is a person who has a place of
abode in the CR for 183 days or more during the
year; residents have a full duty status in the CR.
The history of the Czech state goes back to
the 9th Century (Greater Moravia) and the 10th
Century (the first Bohemian State). Historically,
its periods of greatest political influence and
cultural flowering were in the 13th and 14th Centuries (the last Premyslids, Charles IV) and in the
16th Century (Rudolf II). After centuries of rule as
provinces of the Habsburg Empire (from 1620),
Bohemia and Moravia became an independent
national state (with Slovakia) in 1918 as Czechoslovakia. Between the two world wars Czechoslovakia was a democratic state with a highly
developed economy. The communist period
started in 1948. In 1989 Czechoslovakia changed
its political regime. In 1993 the country was peacefully divided into two independent states: the
Czech Republic and Slovakia. Václav Havel was
the first president of the new Czech state. The
current (i.e. 2011) president is Václav Klaus.
The GDP per capita in CZK was 361 986 in 2010
(exchange rate EUR 1 = 24.5 CZK), the inflation
rate was 1.5% in 2010. The Czech income tax rate
for individual‘s income in 2010 was a flat 15% rate.
The corporate tax was 19% in 2010. Pension and
investment funds pay 5% corporate tax, the rate
of corporation tax was 45% in 1992 as compared
to the present rate of 19%.
The minimum wage was 8,000 CZK in 2010, the
average monthly wage was 25. 803 CZK, but
only 22, 233 in the cultural sector. The rate of
unemployment was ca 9,6% in 2010.
The cultural sector is administered by the Ministry of Culture, and non-profit organisations play
an important role. Since 1989 the latter have
taken the form of civil associations, non-profit
companies, endowment funds, and church legal
entities involved in the provision of educational
and cultural services, the majority of them are
civil associations. In 1996, The Forum 2000 was
founded as a joint initiative of Czech President
Václav Havel, Japanese philanthropist Yohei
Sasakawa, and Nobel Peace Prize laureate Elie
Wiesel in Prague. Since 2000, the Forum 2000
Foundation has been supporting the international NGO Market.
Approximately 15% of the population has a university education and the proportion is growing.
The number of households directly connected to
the Internet is rising dramatically. In 2010, it was
49,2%; 94,6% of households use mobile phones
(active SIM cards).
Note:
Recommended information sources:
www.czso.cz, http://www.culturalpolicies.net,
www.economywatch.com, www.worldwide-tax.com
14
A SHORT HISTORY OF MUSIC
A SHORT HISTORY
OF MUSIC
THE MIDDLE AGES (CA 850–1440)
In the period of the Middle Ages (ca 850–1440)
the liturgical Gregorian Chant began to spread
into the region in the later 9th Century. In 1363
the first Prague Archbishop Arnošt of Pardubice (+1364) ordered the compilation of existing
plainchant repertory (the Gradual of Arnošt of
Pardubice). The best known Czech songs of this
period were Hospodine, pomiluj ny/Lord, Have
Mercy on us originally based on an old Slavonic text and from the 10/11th Centuries, Svatý
Václave, vévodo české země/Saint Wenceslas,
Duke of the Bohemian Land, Buóh všemohúcí/
God Almighty and Jezu kriste, ščedrý kněže/
Jesu Christ, Generous Prince. Latin sacred
cantiones were translated into Czech; lays were
a well-known form of strophic song, for example
O Maria, Matko Božie/Oh, Mary, Mother of God.
The existence of secular music has been documented from the 13th Century. Many German
minnesingers were present at the royal court of
the last Premyslid monarchs and their successors
the Luxembourgs (13th and 14th centuries). The
famous French composer and poet Guillaume de
Machaut (+1377) spent some time in the service
of King John of Luxemburg. Only the texts of the
celebrated love songs of courtly type – Dřevo se
listem odievá/Trees Are Putting on leaves and
what is known as the Song of Záviš Jišť mne vše
radost ostává/All My Joy is Waning have come
down to us. Liturgical polyphony and polytextual motets were performed in 13th and 14th Centuries. The fifteen-year Hussite Period (1419–34)
of religious conflict and civil war had a serious
impact on musical culture in the Bohemian
Lands. The Gregorian Chant was translated into
Czech (Jistebnice Hymnbook, ca 1420) and there
were many monophonic songs about current
political events.
THE RENAISSANCE
The period of the Renaissance in the Bohemian
Lands (ca 1440–1620) was marked by religious
reform and the controversies surrounding it, and
brought various changes in liturgical and sacred
singing (in the Czech language). The musical
styles of Renaissance reached the country from
the middle of 15th Century.
The best known Czech composer of this period
was the nobleman and Rudolfine courtier and
Protestant convert Kryštof Harant of Polžice and
Bezdružice (executed 1621) with his motet Maria
Kron and Missa super Dolorosi martyr.
Many graduals and hymnbooks have survived
from the period, for example the Franus Hymnbook, the Gradual from Chrudim, the Szamotuly
Hymnbook, the Strahov Codex and the Codex
Specialník.
THE BAROQUE
The Baroque period in the Bohemian Lands
(ca 1620–1740) was moulded by the political
and social changes that followed the defeat of
the Revolt of the Estates at the Battle of the
White Mountain in 1620. There were large-scale
confiscations of property and the forced re-catholicisation of the population resulted in mass
emigration, including the departure of many
intellectuals (such as Jan Ámos Komenský/Comenius) and artists. The royal court was moved
to Vienna.
The new musical style began to penetrate into the
Bohemian Lands at the end of the 17th Century,
especially through the import of Italian music.
The first important Czech composer of the Baroque era was Adam Michna of Otradovice
(+ 1676, Česká mariánská muzika/Czech Music
in Honour of the Virgin, Loutna česká/The Czech
Lute e.o.), and he was followed by the trumpet player and Kapellmeister in Olomouc Pavel
Josef Vejvanovský (+1693). The most important
composers of the Bohemian Baroque were Jan
Dismas Zelenka, who lived in Prague and Dresden (+1745, Latin school drama Sub olea pacis
et palma virtutis, six Lamentationes Jeremiae
prophetae e.o.) and Bohuslav Matěj Černohorský
(+1742) who lived in Prague and later in Italy.
Opera reached the Bohemian Lands from
Italy at the beginning of the 17th Century. The
Prague production of court composer Johann J.
Fux´s Constanza e Fortezza presented for the
coronation of the Emperor Charles VI as King of
Bohemia in 1723, was considered to be an extra-
CZECH MUSIC GUIDE
ordinary event involving more than 300 performers. In 1713, the Prague burghers founded the
Music Academy. At the beginning of 1720s J. A.
Questenberg established and cultivated an opera
in his castle in Jaroměřice nad Rokytnou. The
first known Czech opera (originally sung in Italian
but afterwards in Czech) L´origine di Jaromeriz
in Moravia, by František Václav Míča (1694–1744)
was performed here in 1730. Opera was cultivated in many other noble and Episcopal residences (in Kroměříž, Jánský Vrch by Javorník, Roudnice nad Labem, Kuks). The Prague impresarios
expanded their activities to other centres such as
Dresden, Leipzig, and Hamburg. The first Prague
opera entrepreneur was Giovanni F. Sartorio
(1702–5); others included for example Angelo
Mingotti, who started in 1732 in Brno in the New
Town Theatre. The Theatre v Kotcích was opened
in Prague, and provided a venue for operas by
Josef Mysliveček (1737–81), for example. Prague’s
other new theatre funded by Count František
A. Nostitz was opened in 1783 and sold to the
Bohemian Estates in 1798 (The Estates Theatre).
CLASSICISM
What is known as Bohemian Classicism
(ca 1750–1810) was exceptionally important for
music throughout Europe, since at this period
many talented and well-trained musicians from
Bohemia went to major European centres of
culture and rose to influential positions there. This
trend was closely related to the high quality of
rural schools and systematic education provided
by the Jesuits and Piarists in the Bohemian lands.
The War of the Austrian Succession, when the
Bohemian Lands became a battlefield, caused
widespread emigration. Important composers
of the era include the following: František Ignác
Tůma (1704–74) who settled in Vienna before
1729, and was well known especially for his church
compositions; the violin virtuoso and composer
František Benda (1709–88) who worked from
1733 at the royal Prussian court in Berlin; his
brother Jiří Antonín Benda (1722–95) who was
famous particularly for his stage melodramas and
singspiel; the violinist and composer Jan Václav
Stamic (Stamitz, 1717–58) who settled at the
court in Manheim where he built up an orchestra
of good reputation, founded what is known as
the “Manheim School” and pioneered Classicist
style; Antonín Rejcha (1770–1836), who worked in
Bonn, Hamburg and Vienna and was appointed
professor at the Paris Conservatory (1818) where
he taught many famous composers (Berlioz, Gounod, Liszt, Franck).
15
Operatic Life
Josef Mysliveček (1737–81) composed for leading
Italian opera theatres in Milan, Rome and Naples.
His operas and oratorio works were very popular
and much admired. Mozart’s operas Die Entführung aus dem Serail, La nozze di Figaro,
Don Giovanni and Tito were staged in The Estates Theatre. The first opera performed in Czech
translation was the Magic Flute at the Theatre
U Hybernů in 1794. Starting in 1780 the German
theatre companies presented Italian repertoire
in German translation or original singspiels and
serious operas. The Estates Theatre (earlier the
Nostitz Theatre) was the main Prague opera
house until the opening of the National Theatre
in 1883, the second was the New Town Theatre.
ROMANTICISM/NATIONAL MUSIC
The first phase of this period (ca 1810–60)
was associated with the Czech national revival
and search for a distinct national style in music.
The conductor and composer František Škroup
(1801–62) wrote the song Kde domov můj/Where
is My Home (1834), which was later to become
the Czech national anthem. This was also a time
when the institutional structure of Czech music
life (the Conservatory in 1811, the Union of Musical
Artists in 1803) was established. Many famous
foreign composers visited or worked in Bohemia,
especially Prague (C. M. von Weber as a conductor in 1813-16, N. Paganini, C. Schumann, H. Berlioz, and F. Liszt made a tours to Prague). Among
the most important Czech composers of the day
was pianist Václav Jan Tomášek (1774–1850), and
the country’s most famous violin virtuoso Jan
Slavík (1806–33).
Public Music Life after 1860
Folklore
The authentic folk music of the Czech Lands
can be divided into two areas – Bohemian and
Moravian. Moravian folk music is often defined
as the eastern, originally vocal type, while the
folk music of Bohemia is more instrumental and
akin to the music of Austria and Germany. Elite
Baroque and Classicist music also influenced the
folk tradition. During the 19th Century there was
increasing cross-fertilization between country
and urban folk culture and popular composed
music. The folk music of Moravia and Silesia is
closely related to the music of Slovakia, Hungary
and Poland. The structure of the melody is
16
A SHORT HISTORY OF MUSIC
more archaic (modal, asymmetric, with irregular
rhythm). At the beginning of the 20th Century,
“gypsy” bands in Moravia spread the new Hungarian style with an emphasis on solo virtuosity.
Dance songs make up a large part of the repertoire in both Bohemia and Moravia. In Bohemia
there are particularly distinctive folk culture regions in the South and West (Chodsko and Blata)
with a tradition of bagpipe music. Other areas
with a pronounced musical identity are Horácko
with its fiddle bands on the Bohemian-Moravia
border, Slovácko in the South-East, Wallachia
at the North and the Haná in Central Moravia.
Silesia and Lachia were for centuries under the
influence of Polish folk music and so differ from
the rest of Moravia.
The first known collectors of folksongs appeared
in the later 18th Century. What was called the
Gubernial collection organised in 1819 provided
the first serious stimulus for more systematic
collection of folk music. František Sušil, František
Bartoš and Leoš Janáček made the most important collections, which from the beginning of the
20th century have included sound recordings
(made by Otakar Zich, František Pospíšil, Leoš
Janáček and others). In 1895, the folklore of the
Czech lands was presented at the Czechoslovak
Ethnographic Exhibition in Prague.
Opera
The period after 1860 shows concentration on
the genre of opera, which was considered to
be apogee of modern and prestigious national
art. In 1862 the Prozatimní divadlo/Provisional
Theatre was opened in Prague, and the National
Theatre was built in the years 1868–81 (re-opened
in 1883). German opera production continued to
be served by the Stavovské divadlo/The Estates
Theatre where Mozart’s operas Don Giovanni and
La Clemenza di Tito had premiered. The Zemské
divadlo/ Landestheater was opened in 1861.
rom 1888 to 1945, the important Nové německé
divadlo/New German Theatre, today the Státní
opera/The State Opera was playing in Prague.
After 1860, Czech opera companies developed
outside the Prague as well (in Pilsen from 1868,
in Brno from 1884).
Theatre introduced public philharmonic concerts
in 1868. The Czech Philharmonic Orchestra in
Rudolfinum began its history in 1896 with a gala
concert conducted by Antonín Dvořák. Chamber
music had previously been performed mainly in
private settings, but public chamber concerts
were organised from 1876 by the Prague Kammermusikverein/Association for Chamber Music
and from 1894 by the Český spolek pro komorní
hudbu/Czech Association for Chamber Music.
In 1861 have been founded the Czech choral
society Hlahol, in 1860 the Beseda brněnská/the
Brno Association in Brno, and in 1880 the Žerotín
Choir in Olomouc.
All these, our oldest orchestras and choirs,
still exist today. In 1863 the Umělecká beseda/
The Arts Association in Prague was formed. Its
foundation Hudební matice/Music Foundation
financed the publication of many works by Czech
composers, mostly in the form of popular piano
arrangements. The structure of public music life
was established.
Top Composers of Czech national
Music in the 19th Century
Smetana, Dvořák, Fibich
The formation of so-called “national schools” or
“national music” was a phenomenon peculiar to
the era of Romanticism, Late Romanticism and
the beginning of the 20th Century in Europe.
Styles and themes in the arts were often inspired
by real or constructed folk tradition and by a
Orchestras, Chamber Music
and Choirs
The oldest Czech orchestras were founded in the
Czech spas Teplice/Schönau and Karlovy Vary/
Karlsbad (in 1831 and 1834). In Prague, Bedřich
Smetana with the Orchestra of the Provisional
B. Smetana / by M. Švabinský
CZECH MUSIC GUIDE
A. Dvořák
17
Z. Fibich
national cultural and political needs to find and
celebrate historical roots.
Bedřich Smetana (1824–84) and Antonín Dvořák
(1841–1904) are the two best-known Czech
composers of this generation. Smetana’s most
enduring works include his cycle of symphonic
poems Má vlast/My Country (1874–79), and his
two string quartets: No. 1 Z mého života/From My
Life E minor, No. 2 in D minor; his most famous
operas include Prodaná nevěsta/The Bartered
Bride (1866), Dalibor (1868), and Hubička/The
Kiss (1876), and among his piano compositions
České tance/Czech Dances and the cycle Rêves/
Dreams are particularly well-known.
Antonín Dvořák is famous for his 9 symphonies,
especially the 7th-9th (From the New World),
the Cello Concerto B minor, the cycle Slavonic
Dances (1878), Gypsy and Love Songs, Stabat
mater, his Requiem, and the best-known among
his operas is Rusalka (1901).
The third famous composer of this era was the
Prague composer Zdeněk Fibich (1850–1900),
whose choice of themes was more universal and
orientated to the overall European tradition. His
original creative contribution was primarily in the
genre of melodrama (trilogy Hippodamia (1893)
and in music for piano, especially Nálady, dojmy,
upomínky/Moods, Impressions and Reminiscences (1892-98) inspired by his personal love
experience.
E. Destinn
at the turn of the century and later. The best
Czech singers were the sopranos Teresa Stolz
(1834–1902), who was a close friend of Verdi,
and Emmy Destinn (1878–1930), and the tenors
Karel (Carl) Burian (1870–1924) and Otakar
Mařák (1872–1939). The private singing school of
František Pivoda (1824–98) trained many leading
Czech and foreign operatic singers.
In 1883 in Olomouc and later in the 1885–86 season the young Gustav Mahler (1860–1911) worked
as a conductor at the Prague German Opera,
which in the period 1885–1910 was directed by
the excellent Angelo Neumann (1838–1910).
After Neumann’s death, Alexander von Zemlinsky
(1872–1941) continued in his famous repertoire
tradition (especially works by R. Wagner, A.
Schoenberg) up to the year 1927.
THE PERIOD 1890–1945
The period 1890–1945 was culturally very dynamic. In music it was an era of late Romanticism
and emergent Modernism with a strong process
of individualization in composing styles.
Top Performers of the 2nd half of 19th
Century and Turn of the Century
Top Czech Composers of the Period
The top performers of string instruments in the
later 19th century and at the turn of the century
were the violinists Ferdinand Laub (1832–75),
František Ondříček (1857–1922) and the first performer of the Dvořák Cello Concerto in B Minor,
cellist Hanuš Wihan (1855–1920). The ensemble
Czech Quartet (1892–1933) became a model for
many other chamber string groups established
Leoš Janáček (1854–1928), who was born in
North Moravia and lived in Brno, Prague, Leipzig
and Vienna, was the leading Czech composer of
this period. His individual composing style influenced many Czech and Moravian composers.
He is particularly well-known for his operas Její
pastorkyňa/Jenůfa (1903), Káťa Kabanová (1921),
Příhody lišky Bystroušky/The Cunning Little
18
A SHORT HISTORY OF MUSIC
Vixen (1923), Věc Makropulos/The Makropulos
Case (1925), and Z mrtvého domu/From the
House of the Dead (1928), which are part of the
core repertoire of many prominent opera companies around the world. Of his chamber works,
his two brilliant string quartets (1923,1928), the
piano Sonata 1.X. 1905, the cycle V Mlhách/
In the Mists (1912), and the song cycle Zápisník zmizelého/The Wandering Madman (1922)
have proved most attractive to performers, of
his orchestral and choral works the best known
are Glagolská mše/Glagolitic Mass (1926) and
Taras Bulba (1916). He was also a very important
choirmaster, teacher and organiser of music life
especially in Brno.
Another notable Czech composer of the period
was Josef Suk (1874–1935), who for many years
played the violin in the Czech Quartet. International interest has focused on his famous orchestral
Late Romantic cycles Asrael (1906), Pohádka
léta/A Summer Tale (1909), Zrání/The Ripening
(1917) and The Epilogue (1932). His symphonic
poem Radúz and Mahulena (1899) and piano
cycle Životem a snem/Things Lived and Dreamt
are also frequently performed.
The earlier phase of the career of Bohuslav
Martinů (1890–1959) falls into the interwar period. His best-known works of this time are the
surrealist opera Julietta aneb snář/Julietta or the
Book of Dream composed in France (1936–
37), the sung ballet Špalíček/The Chapbook
(1932/40) and the opera-ballet Hry o Marii/The
Miracles of Mary (1932–34).
Composer, choirmaster, music theorist and teacher
Josef Bohuslav Foerster (1859–1951) is still waiting
to be discovered by the international music world,
although his Stabat mater has been revived in
Czech concert life and his opera Eva staged in
2004 at a festival in Great Britain.
The works of composer and pianist Vítězslav
Novák (1870–1949) are in a similar situation. Some
of his symphonic poems, for example O věčné
touze/ The Eternal Longing (1904), and V Tatrách/
In the Tatras (1902, revised 1907), and such song
cycles as Melancholické písně o lásce/Melancholic
Songs about Love (1906), and cantatas such as
Bouře/The Storm are among the most beautiful
music of the Late Romanticism and Impressionism.
Further important composers of this generation
and different styles include for example the
Expressionists Ladislav Vycpálek (1882–1969),
Otakar Jeremiáš (1892–1962) and Karel Boleslav Jirák (1892–1972), the Neo-Classicist
Pavel Bořkovec (1894–1972), the versatile Emil
František Burian (1904–59) and Jaroslav Ježek
(1906–42) who both used jazz idioms, the woman composer Vítězslava Kaprálová (1915–40),
Rudolf Friml (1879–1972) the successful operetta
composer and emigrant to the USA, and the
composer of film music in Hollywood Erich
Wolfgang Korngold (1897–1957). A group of
interesting Bohemian/German/Jewish composers perished in Nazi camps: Erwin Schulhoff
(1893–1942), Pavel Haas (1899–1944), Viktor Ullmann (1898–1944), Hans Krása (1899–1944) and
Gideon Klein (1919–1945).
Among composers of popular music we should
mention the cabaret singer and actor Karel
Hašler (1879–1941) and later composer Jaromír
Vejvoda (1902–88), author of the melody Škoda
lásky/Rosamunde, better known as the Beer Barrels Polka or “Roll out the Barrel”of 1934.
Opera and Concert Life
L. Janáček
In the first half of the 20th Century the conductor Karel Kovařovic (1900–20) and particularly
the conductor and composer Otakar Ostrčil
(1920–35) formed the repertoire and staging
style of the National Theatre in Prague. Angelo
Neumann (1885–1910) was the respected head
of the Prague German Theatre. From the 1920s
the most important directors in Czechoslovakia
were František Pujman (1889–1961) and Jindřich
Honzl. In Brno, the leading figures were František
Neumann (director 1919–29) who staged world
premieres of operas by Leoš Janáček, and the
pioneering Milan Sachs (director 1932-39), who
CZECH MUSIC GUIDE
B. Martinů
V. Novák
staged world premieres of music by Sergei
Prokofiev and Dmitri Shostakovich. The most
interesting composers of the time included Leoš
Janáček, Bohuslav Martinů, Otakar Ostrčil and
Otakar Jeremiáš.
The must successful Czech soprano working
abroad was Jarmila Novotná (1907–94) who studied with Ema Destinnová. She shone in the role
of Smetana´s Mařenka at the National Theatre
at the age of only 18. After studies in Italy, she
took up an engagement in Berlin. After the rise
of Fascism in Germany, she worked in Vienna
and Prague; in 1939 she emigrated in USA and
worked as a soloist at the Metropolitan Opera
until1956. She inspired the English translation of
Smetana´s opera The Bartered Bride.
J. Suk
19
J. Novotná
The best-known Czech orchestra, the Czech
Philharmonic, was founded in 1896 in Prague, and
its opening concert was conducted by A. Dvořák
(see above). Leading conductors in the inter-war
period included Václav Talich (1883–1961) and
Rafael Kubelík (1914–96). The history of the Brno
Symphony Orchestra goes back to the plans of
the composer L. Janáček and his pupil Břetislav
Bakala (1897–1958), who created the Brno Radio
Orchestra that in 1956 became the Brno State
Orchestra (today’s Brno Philharmonic Orchestra). The second important symphony orchestra
founded after Czech Philharmonic Orchestra was
the Prague Radio Symphony Orchestra (SOČR)
formed in 1926. The Prague Symphony Orchestra was formed in 1934 in Prague as a orchestra
orientated not only to concert performance, but
also to film and operatic music.
The Choral Association of Moravian Teachers
(founded 1903) did a great deal to help create
the tradition of modern choral singing and to
promote Czech choral music abroad. The largest
professional choir in the Czech Republic, the
Prague Philharmonic Choir (up to 1969 known
as the Czech Choir) was founded in 1935. Many
famous composers of contemporary music wrote
for them (e.g. Janáček, Foester, Novák, Suk,
Ostrčil, Martinů).
Czech chamber music in this period was particularly strong in string quartets, trios and wind
ensembles. In 1892 students of conservatory
formed the first Czech professional chamber
ensemble – the Czech Quartet (1892–1933), the
Czech Trio (from 1899). During the inter-war period the tradition of string quartets was carried
forward particularly by the Ondříček Quartet
(1921–56), the Prague Quartet (1922–66), and
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A SHORT HISTORY OF MUSIC
the Moravian Quartet (1923–59), and the Czech
Nonet (since 1924) was especially notable.
The piano virtuosi Jan Heřman (1886–1946)
and Rudolf Firkušný (1912–94), who emigrated
in 1939, were among the best-known promoters
of Czech music abroad.
Folklore, Pop Music and Jazz
Many amateur folk ensembles and societies were
founded in the 1930s.
The first authentic Czech cabaret Červená
sedma/The Seven of Hearts was opened in 1910
in Prague. Karel Hašler (1879–1941) wrote highly
successful sentimental urban songs. Czechoslovakia (after 1918) was one of the first European
countries to introduce public radio broadcasting (Radio journal): in 1923 in Prague, in 1924
in Brno and, in 1929 in Ostrava. The first Czech
jazz bands were The Melody Makers (1925) and
Melody Boys (1929), both founded by the singer,
pianist and composer R.A. Dvorský (1899–1966).
From the late 1920s the Osvobozené divadlo/
The Liberated Theatre founded by songwriters,
actors and clowns Jiří Voskovec (1905–81) and
Jan Werich (1905–80) and composer Jaroslav
Ježek (1906–42) played a very important role in
cultural life, and during the thirties turned significantly towards political satire. Ljuba Hermannová
(1913–96) started her long career as a cabaret singer at this theatre During the Twenties, a fashion
for what was known as the tramp style of living
inspired by American Westerns took hold, and
included a special Czech form of country singing.
The entertainment industry started in the genre
of operetta (e.g. Jára Beneš), in Czech known
as “lidovka” (i.e. simple traditional popular songs
inspired by folk music but also modern dances).
The best-know songs were composed by Karel
Vacek (1902–80) and Jaromír Vejvoda (see
above).
In the area of jazz swing music achieved a particularly distinctive level. In the 1930s the Prague
Gramoklub Orchestra conducted by Jan Šíma
(1911–83) was founded, and the Orchestra of Karel
Vlach playing under the latter’s baton until his
death in 1986. Bandmaster and singer Gustav
Brom (1921–95) founded his jazz band in 1940 in
Brno. Versatile Emil František Burian (1904–1959)
wrote the first Czech publication on jazz (Jazz,
1928) and in 1932/33 headed the cabaret Červené
eso/The Ace of Hearts. In 1934, he founded the
avant-garde theatre D 34 where he invented
a new choral style known as voice band technique based on rythmical choral declamation. At
the turn of 20/30s the first phonograph record
companies Ultraphon and Esta were established.
J. Voskovec, J. Werich with J. Ježek
CZECH MUSIC AFTER 1945
According to the statistics, about 20 000 classical works were composed in the years 1945–85.
Financial support from the socialist Czech Music
Fund and state commissions allowed a great
many so-called “committed authors” to devote
themselves entirely to composing. The dark side
of the situation was the complete exclusion from
professional musical life or restriction of professional life suffered by a number of good composers (e.g. Miloslav Kabeláč, Zbyněk Vostřák,
Marek Kopelent), some of whom went into exile
(e.g. Jan Novák).
Bohuslav Martinů was living abroad and during
this period composed his crowning works, such
as Fantasies symphoniques (1953), Fresky Piera
della Franceska/Frescoes of Piero della Francesco (1953), Paraboly/Parables for large orchestra
(1958), the oratorio Epos o Gilgamešovi/The
Epic of Gilgamesh (1955), Otvírání studánek/
The Opening of the Springs, the Concerto for
oboe and viola and three of his five concertos for
piano and orchestra. He also wrote the opera The
Greek Passion/Řecké pašije, existing in two completely different versions, (1954–59) and recently
staged around the world.
The most interesting composers of the post1945 era were Miloslav Kabeláč (1908–79), the
composers of orchestral and chamber music:
Klement Slavický (1910–99), Jan Novák (1921–84),
and Vladimír Sommer (1921–97). Sommer’s
CZECH MUSIC GUIDE
M. Kabeláč
V. Sommer
Vokální symfonie/Vocal Symphony (1958) on
texts by F. Kafka, F.M. Dostoyevsky and C. Pavese
was the crowning work of this period.
The Czech scene also included the famous
film music composers Václav Trojan (1907–83,
especially music to Trnka´s films), Jiří Srnka
(1907–82) and Zdeněk Liška (1922–83) e.g. music
for Zeman´s film Vynález zkázy/Invention of Destruction, Vláčil´s famous Markéta Lazarová and
Údolí včel/Bees Valley.
Concert Life, State Symphony
Orchestras, Chamber Ensembles,
Soloists
Operatic Life
The end of the Second World War brought fundamental changes in opera life.
All German companies in the Czech lands were
dissolved and their buildings went to new or
existing Czech companies in Liberec, Ústí nad
Labem, Ostrava, Olomouc, Opava, later in České
Budějovice.
The era of the Opera of the 5th of May in the
period 1945-48 (later renamed the Smetana
Theatre) in Prague continued in the best traditions of Czech opera theatre. Its profile was
developed by composer Alois Hába (1893–1973),
directors Alfréd Radok (1914–76) and Václav
Kašlík (1917–89) together with the stage designer František Tröster (1904–68) and especially
Josef Svoboda (1920–2002) with his principle
of light and kinetic stages. The opera of the 5th
of May was soon incorporated into the Prague
National Opera. In Brno, the directors Ladislav
Štros (*1926) and Václav Věžník (*1930) played a
formative role, as well as a programme director
and conductor Václav Nosek (1921-2000).
The repertoire focused mainly on Czech music.
The most famous singers working abroad were
the sopranos Soňa Červená (*1925) and Ludmila
Dvořáková (*1923), the bass Zdeněk Kroupa
(1921–99) and the mezzo-soprano Eva Randová
(*1936).
21
S. Červená
Communist Czechoslovakia had a policy of
developing and maintaining a network of what
were known as “state orchestras” in such a way
that each of 10 former regions would have at
least one professional symphony orchestra. These
orchestras, established one after the other up to
the eighties, were all relatively balanced in terms
of professional quality and programmes. The
biggest regional orchestras outside Prague (ca
90–120 members) were the Brno State Philharmonic (now the Brno Philharmonic Orchestra)
formed in 1956 by transformation of the the Radio
Symphony Orchestra, the Janáček Philharmonic
Orchestra Ostrava (since 1954) and the Bohuslav
Martinů Orchestra in Zlín (since 1946, first as the
Symphony Orchestra of the Baťa State Concert).
Many of these orchestras had permanent affiliated permanent choir ensembles and soloists. This
network of state orchestras was completed by
the media orchestras: the Prague Radio Orchestra
(since 1926, see above), the Pilsen Philharmonic
Orchestra (since 1919) and the Film Symphony
Orchestra (since 1949) in Prague.
The tradition of choir music continued. In 1958
another legendary choir, the Kühn Mixed Choir
was founded; The Prague Philharmonic Choir was
affiliated to the Czech Philharmonic Orchestra
in 1963 (to the year 1991). After the death of Jan
Kühn in 1959, Josef Veselka and later Lubomír
Mátl became its conductors.
After 1945 the tradition of chamber ensembles continued. The best Czech quartets of the
period included the Smetana Quartet (1945),
the Janáček Quartet (1947), and the Vlach Quartet (1950).
The new trend toward authentic interpretation of
old music was developed especially by Miroslav
22
A SHORT HISTORY OF MUSIC
Smetana Quartet
Venhoda´s mixed choir Schola cantorum (former
boy’s choir, 1939-50) and Noví pěvci madrigalů/
New Singers of Madrigals, Milan Munclinger´s
ensemble Ars rediviva (1951) and Miloslav
Klement´s Symposium musicum (1953).
In 1946 the private music labels Esta and
Ultraphon were nationalised, and a new label
Supraphon was set up for export purposes. The
tradition of releasing top classical and Czech
music (sets with conductors Karel Ančerl, Václav
Talich, Václav Smetáček, violinist Josef Suk, pianists František Rauch and Jan Panenka, Smetana,
Vlach Quartets and others) was established.
Cellist Miloš Sádlo (1912–2003), a former member
of the Prague Quartet, played in the Czech Trio
(1941–56), and the Suk Trio (1957–59) reached
as a chamber player and lifelong teacher world
renomé. Pianists František Maxián (1907–71),
František Rauch (1910-96) and Pavel Štěpán
(1925–98) belonged to the most important
interpreters of Czech piano music. Pianist Jan
Páleníček (1914–91), a former member of famous
Czech Trio, started his career after 1945 notably
as a interpreter of Leoš Janáček, Bohuslav Martinů and Beethoven.
After his emigration in 1966, the cellist František
Smetana (1914–2004) a former member of the
Czech Nonet, became an important teacher and
promoter of Czech music abroad.
The top Czech guitar school was founded by
Milan Zelenka (*1939) who won prizes in Moscow
and Vienna at the end of the 1950s and Jiří Jirmal
(*1925).
A famous double-bass school was founded by
František Pošta (1919–91).
The Czech organ school was developed particularly by Milan Šlechta (1923–98) who performed
the complete organ output of J.S. Bach.
The best in the Czech classical vocal tradition,
of various generations, was represented by such
names as Karel Berman (1919–95), Beno Blachut
(1913–85), Libuše Domanínská (*1924), Eduard
Haken (1910–96), Josef Horáček (*1926), Dalibor
Jedlička (*1929), Naděžda Kniplová (*1932),
Přemysl Kočí (1917–2003) Alena Míková (*1928),
Marie Jeremiášová-Budíková (1904–84),
Richard Novák (*1931), Marie Podvalová (1909–
92), Vilém Přibyl (*1925–90), Věra Soukupová
(*1932), Milada Šubrtová (1924–2011), Antonín
Švorc (*1934), Helena Tattermuschová (*1933),
Marie Tauberová (1911–2003), Drahomíra Tikalová
(1915–97), René Tuček (*1936), Eva Zikmundová (*1932), Václav Zítek (*1932) and Ivo Žídek
(1926–2003).
Folklore, Pop music and Jazz
The communist regime favoured the revival
of folk traditions, but preferred the controlled
form of large professional folk ensembles (e.g.
Czech State Song and Dance Ensemble, Brno
Radio Orchestra of Folk Instruments so-called
BROLN) and official festivals such as the oldest
held since 1946 in Strážnice. The best-known
folk singer to start her career after 1948 (with
the ensemble Vsacan and orchestra BROLN)
CZECH MUSIC GUIDE
J. Šuláková
has been Jarmila Šuláková (*1929) and younger
Jožka Černý (*1942).
Modern jazz was to some extent suppressed in
the 1950s and replaced by so-called mass socialist culture and public entertainment. The swing
and blues singer Vlasta Průchová (1926–2006)
started her long career with her husband jazz
vibraphone player Jan Hammer (+1989).
Good pop music followed world trends in
preferring lilting voices (singers Richard Adam,
Milan Chladil, Yvetta Simonová, Judita Čeřovská
who also sang abroad, and Josef Zíma, also wellknown as a successful dubbing singer of foreign
film musicals).
THE SIXTIES/AVANT-GARDE,
NEW MUSIC
All over Europe the Sixties was a crucial period
for the avant-garde, New Music, electro-acoustic
music and the take-off of pop and rock music.
In Czechoslovakia, the New Music in classical music
was represented by groups like the Novák Quartet
(up to 1955 the Hába Quartet), and Musica viva
Pragensis associated with composers Jan Rychlík,
Zbyněk Vostřák, Marek Kopelent and Rudolf Komorous, the Due Boemi di Praga, Sonatori di Praga,
and The Prague Group of New Music including
composers Marek Kopelent, Rudolf Komorous,
Zbyněk Vostřák. In Brno, there was the Studio of
Authors and Group A bringing together the composers Josef Berg, Miloslav Ištvan and Alois Piňos.
23
Miloslav Kabeláč (1908–79), Zbyněk Vostřák
(1920–85), and Luboš Fišer (1935–99) must be
ranked among the must interesting composers
of this generation. They united the conceptualism of the avant-garde with creative inspiration
and impressive sound. Kabeláč´s eight symphonies composed between 1941-70 with different
individualised orchestration, the orchestral
Eufemias Mysterion (1965), and Zrcadlení/Reflections (1963-64) represent his best works.
He was also one of founders of Czech electroacoustic music with his E fontibus Bohemicis
(1972) and organisational activities.
Zbyněk Vostřák radically changed his music
techniques during the sixties. His conceptual
style especially in electronic music (Váhy světla/
Scales of Light, 1967, Dvě ohniska/Two Foci,
Sedm prahů/Seven Thresholds 1970, Parabola
pro orchestr a EA/Parable for large orchestra
and EA, 1977-78 a.o.) are distinctive for their
pure and even esoteric conceptualism of form
and sound. The work of Luboš Fišer (1935-99)
seems at first sight highly spontaneous with a
full timbre, but much of his music is very strongly
harmonically conceived. His best works have
been the chamber opera Lancelot (1960), the
orchestral Patnáct listů podle Dürerovy Apokalypsy/Fifteen Prints Based on Dürer´s Apocalypse, which won prizes in the festival Prague
Spring and UNESCO competitions (1965), and
the choral Capriccios inspired by Goya´s images
(1966). He composed more than 300 film scores
(for example movies Golet v údolí/Valley of Exile,
1994, Král Ubu/Ubu the King, 1996 or Helimadoe
1993). Zdeněk Liška (see above) was another
internationally acclaimed composer who drew
international attention with his music to K. Zeman‘s movie Vynález zkázy/The Fabulous World
of Jules Verne (1958); he also composed music
for the Oscar-winning movie Obchod na Korze/
The Shop on Main Street (1965), Vláčil‘s movies
Markéta Lazarová and Údolí včel/The Valley of
the Bees. (1967), Spalovač mrtvol /The Cremator by director J. Herz (1968). His last film was
Signum laudi from 1980.
Composer Marek Kopelent (*1932) went through
many stylistic transformations from the Neo-Romantic, to Serialism and then to his current combination of many techniques. His works were published and played especially in Germany. Audiences
interested in modern music have been impressed
by his collective work Laudatio pacis composed
with P. H. Dittrich (GDR) and S. Gubaidulina (USSR)
on texts by J. A. Komenský (Comenius). He is also
an author of Messagio della Bonta – oratorio to
the texts of T. Bosco (1987), oratorio Lux Mirandae
Sanctitatis (1994), symphonic song for orchestra
24
A SHORT HISTORY OF MUSIC
L. Fišer
Z. Vostřák
Arííjah (1996) and many chamber compositions,
vocal works (e.g. Snehah for soprano, jazz contra-alto, tape recording and chamber ensemble
(1967), melodrama Nářek ženy/A Woman´s Lament
(1980), and choral works like Regina lucis on a Latin text from the Czech Franus Hymn Book (1985).
Czech-born Canadian composer and well-known
bassoon player Rudolf Komorous (*1931), member of group “Šmidrs” was part of the New Music
movement with his operas Lady Blancarosa (1966)
and No no miya (1988), and many orchestral,
chamber and elektroacoustic pieces
Composer and flutist Petr Kotík (*1942), actually
living in U.S.A., leader of performing-art orientated QUAX group (1966–69) has been attracted to
Cage´s aesthetics. Versatile musician Jan Rychlík
(1916–64) composed in mixed style (e.g. Africký
cyklus/African Cycle). During 60th, composer Jan
Kapr (1914–88) looked for new sound colour possiblities (Cvičení pro Gydli/Exercises for Gidli, 1967).
Jan Klusák (*1934), Svatopluk Havelka (1925–2009),
Otmar Mácha (1922–2006) Petr Eben (1929–2007)
and Zdeněk Lukáš (1928–2007), Viktor Kalabis
(1923–2006) and Jindřich Feld (1925–2007) have
been among the more traditionally oriented interesting Czech composers of the generation that
came on the scene in the Sixties.
Jan Klusák attracted attention especially with his
orchestral Variations on a Theme of Gustav Mahler
(1962) and the cycle of his Inventions, and more
recently with his stage works – the chamber opera
Zpráva pro Akademii/Report for the Academy
after F. Kafka´s story (1993–97) and Bertram and
Mescalinda (1982–2002). He has also written music
for more than 140 titles of films, TV programmes
and stage productions.
Like many Czech composers of this period Svatopluk Havelka was attracted to humanistic themes
and cultural traditions. His most ground-breaking
pieces have been his cantata Chvála světla/
In Praise of Light (1959), Heptameron (1964),
symphonic fantasy Hommage à H. Bosch (1974),
Oratorio Poggi Florentini (1984) and more recently,
for example, his Znamení času/The Signs of the
Time for symphonic orchestra (1996). He has been
also the author of more than 200 titles of film and
stage music.
Otmar Mácha started his career with the oratorio Odkaz Jana Ámose/Heritage of Jan Ámos
Comenius (1955). He presented his mature style
in his orchestral Variace na téma Jana Rychlíka/
Variations on a Theme of Jan Rychlík (1964) and
opera Jezero Ukereve/Lake Ukereve (1960-63)
and Proměny Prometheovy/Metamorphosis of
Prometheus (1981). He composed the orchestral
Sinfonia Bohemorum for the 110th anniversary of
the Czech Philharmonic orchestra.
Petr Eben is well-known and respected primarily
for his organ works: Nedělní hudba/Sunday Music,
Okna/Windows, Job (for which he was awarded
the Order Chevalier des Arts et Letters by the
French Minister of Culture) and others.
Among his symphonic works the oratorios Apologia Socratus (1967) and Vox clamantis (1969) have
attracted the most attention in the international
music forum. He is played around the world and
his work has been recorded by Sony BMG and
Multisonic. His most recent major work is the opera
Jeremiah (1996–97).
Zdeněk Lukáš has been successful particularly
with his vocal music. Viktor Kalabis´output, especially his symphonies, string quartets, concertante works and music for harpsichord have been
performed in several countries.
Oldřich F. Korte (*1926) worked with the famous
Magic Lantern Theatre in Prague, and his bestknown score for this theatre has been Kouzelný
cirkus/The Magic Circus (1977). For the past 30
years Korte has cooperated with other prominent
companies such as the Prague National Theatre,
the Folktheater Goeteborg, and the Müncher Kammerspiele.
The Brno composers Miloslav Ištvan (1928–90),
Alois Piňos (1925–2008), Arnošt Parsch (*1936),
Miloš Štědroň (*1942), Josef Berg (1927–71) and
Rudolf Růžička (*1941) have all followed their own
distinctive paths in composing, some with a special system of rational organisation e.g. Alois Piňos,
Arnošt Parsch, Miloslav Ištvan and Rudolf Růžička,
but also through play, humour and collage (Miloš
Štědroň) and poetry (Josef Berg). Typical features
of this group of Brno composers have been multimedia projects (e.g. trilogy by A. Piňos Statická
hudba/Static Music, Mříže/Grille and Geneze/
Genesis), highly individually conceived chamber
operas and stage productions (e.g. Berg´s Evropská turistika/European Tourism (1963), Eufrides
před branami Tymén/Eufrides before the Gates
CZECH MUSIC GUIDE
M. Kopelent
J. Klusák
of Tymen (1964) and unfinished Johannes Doctor
Faustus), and collective compositions e.g. in the
electro-acoustic genre (Peripetie pro komorní
orchestr a EA/Peripeteia for chamber orchestra
and EA, Ecce homo for soprano, basso, chamber
orchestra and EA, EA compositions Mlčení ptáčků
v lese/ Silence of the Little Birds in the Wood, Capriccio and others composed by the team J. Berg,
M. Ištvan, A. Parsch, A. Piňos and M. Štědroň).
Some of these electro-acoustic compositions
have won prizes in the international competitions
(Ružička´s Gurges and later Crucifiction II).
New creative stimuli for opera also came from
Prague in the 1960s (composers: Ilja Hurník- Dáma
a Lupiči/Lady and Roberrs, Mudrci a Bloudi/Sages
and Naive Persons, Jiří Pauer-Žvanivý slymejš/
Talkative Snail, Otmar Mácha-Jezero Ukereve/Lake
Ukereve, Luboš Fišer-Lancelot).
Concert Life, Ensembles and Soloists
In the area of New music the leading groups
were Musica viva Pragensis, Sonatori di Praga,
Prague Group of New Music, Novák Quartet and
Due Boemi di Praga in Prague and Studio of Authors and Group A in Brno, all of them presenting
progressive contemporary music to the Czech
public.
Electro-acoustic music was produced even earlier in the Pilsen Radio Studio.
New ensembles specialising in historical music were founded alongside those that already
existed. They included Lukáš Matoušek´s Ars
cameralis (since 1963), Collegium flauto dolce
(since 1966) and Barok Collegium (since 1969), all
devoted to the interpretation of Early music. The
Collegium musicum Pragense founded in 1963
devoted itself to the interpretation of wind music
of the 18th and 19th Century and has also become
a sought-after ensemble for contemporary wind
music. The Slovak Chamber Orchestra founded
25
by Bohdan Warchal (1930–2000) in 1960 also
focused on Baroque music and has given many
successful concerts in Bohemia and Moravia.
The tradition of Czech quartet music has continued with the founding of new (or revived)
ensembles such as the Talich Quartet (1964), Suk
Quartet (1968), Panocha Quartet (1969), and the
City of Brno Quartet (1969).
The famous Due Boemi di Praga (J. Horák-bcl. and
E. Kovárnová-piano) founded in 1963, has inspired
many new compositions.
The older generation of performers includes
such internationally acclaimed names as flutist
Milan Munclinger (1923–86), pianists Ivan Moravec
(*1930), Emil Leichner (*1938), violist Lubomír
Malý (1938), cellists Josef Chuchro (1931–2009)
and Alexandr Večtomov (1930–1989), organist Jan
Hora (*1936), harpsichord player Zuzana Růžičková
(*1927) and percussionist Vladimír Vlasák (*1928).
The top Supraphon recordings of the period
were sets of Dvořák, Martinů and Mahler music
conducted by the Czech Philharmonic’s principal conductor Václav Neumann (1920–95), a
set of Beethoven violin sonatas with Josef Suk
(1929–2011) and Jan Panenka (1922–99) and
Beethoven´s and Czech quartets interpreted by
the Smetana Quartet.
The prestigious Prague Spring competition
associated with the festival became (and has
remained) a launch pad for the careers of many
young artists especially from the prestigious
Czech wind school such as flutist Zdeněk Bruderhans since 70s year working and living abroad,
trombonist Zdeněk Pulec (*1936), oboists Jiří
Tancibudek (1921–2004) (later living in Australia)
and Jiří Kaniak( *1943) and hornist Zdeněk Tylšar
(1945–2006).
The Panton label was oriented to presentation
of contemporary Czech music. Some projects
under the administration of composer Jan Hanuš
managed to go beyond the usual limits imposed
by communist cultural control.
Czech opera companies were joined by promising
singers of the younger generation such as Marta
Boháčová (*1936), Jana Jonášová (*1943) and
Libuše Márová (*1943).
Pop Music and Jazz in the Sixties
In the Sixties the political situation experienced
a certain thaw and became more favourable to
culture life.
A modern jazz style was evolved by the ensemble SHQ (multi-instrumentalist Karel Velebný
(1931–89), double-bass player and composer
Luděk Hulan (1929–1979), flutist and promoter
of the free jazz style Jiří Stivín (*1942) and Laco
26
A SHORT HISTORY OF MUSIC
THE SEVENTIES AND EIGHTIES
K. Kryl
K. Gott
Déczi (*1938). Another important ensemble was
trio Jazz Cellula established in 1964 by jazz guitarist Rudolf Dašek (*1933) with bassist and alto
saxophonist George Mraz (*1944) who has lived
and worked in the USA since 1970. After 1967,
they played as quintet Jazz Cellula.
The seedbed of good jazz performers and smaller progressive formations such as Jazz studio (a
formation established in 1966 by L. Déczi, who
is now settled in New York) was the Czechoslovak Radio Dance Orchestra (TOČR and its jazz
variant (JOČR) conducted by the composer and
saxophonist Karel Krautgartner (1922–82), the
Orchestra of Karel Vlach remains a top. Singers
such as Pavel Sedláček and Miki Volek were inspired by rock n´roll music. The most successful
rock bands of the time were Olympic (founded in
1963), and Framus V (founded by Michal Prokop
in 1963). The industrial city of Ostrava gave birth
to a very distinctive popular culture (special
urban folk, soul music, singers such as Marie Rottrová and Věra Špinarová).
The must interesting folk singer, songwriter and
writer of protest-songs was Karel Kryl (1944–94),
who emigrated to Germany. The first folk group
in Czechoslovakia was the Spiritual Quintet founded in 1960.
One of most typical products of the era were
what was known as the theatres of minor forms.
The top theatre ensemble of this time was Semafor founded by songwriter and actor Jiří Suchý
(*1931) and musician and artist Jiří Šlitr (192469). This theatre became a nursery for many
Czech pop stars who are still performing today,
such as Karel Gott (*1939), Eva Pilarová (*1939),
Helena Vondráčková (*1947), Waldemar Matuška
(1932–2009) and others.
The political events of 1968 had a massive impact
on the next two decades of Czech culture. Many
people emigrated, and many stayed but faced serious professional restrictions and even persecution.
For many composers of the older generation it was
a time of style synthesis. Interesting representatives of the younger generation of composers included Jaroslav Krček (*1939), who like Ivana Loudová
was a pupil of M. Kabeláč. Krček was not only a
founder and artistic director of the famous folk
ensemble Musica Bohemica (since 1975), but has
also written a number of contemplative works (e.g.
Symphony No 1.,1974, Symphony No.2 in the vocalinstrumental form, 1983, and an EA opera Nevěstka
Rab/Rab the Harlot , 1971, where he used an
artificial language). Ivana Loudová (*1941) made her
name with the well conceived form and interesting
orchestration of her Concerto for Percussions, Organ and Wind Orchestra (1974), Dramatic Concerto
for Solo Percussion and Wind Orchestra (1979),
Double Concerto for Violin, Percussion and Strings
(1989) and many chamber and solo compositions.
Milan Slavický (1947–2009) attracted attention with
his orchestral Hommage à Saint-Exupery (1971) and
symphonic triptych Sinfonia mortis et vitae. Ivan
Kurz (*1947) made a successful start with his Symphonies (1973, 77) and went on to compose such
works as his symphonic picture Nakloněná rovina /
Inclined Plane (1979), Emergence (1981) and Parable
(1983). Sylvie Bodorová (*1954) has devoted herself
exclusively to composing since the Eighties (e.g.
Planctus for Viola and Orchestra, Pontem video-a
concerto for organ and strings).
The young generation of avant-garde composers united in the open platform for composers,
interpreters and musicologists known as Agon
Orchestra (since 1983). The leading figures in Agon
have been the composer and conductor of the
ensemble Petr Kofroň (*1955), composer Martin
Smolka (*1959) and composer and musicologist
Miroslav Pudlák (*1961).
All these authors incline to Minimalism. Martin
Smolka has been the most prolific, notably since
1989. He also likes to use unconventional instruments and forms and is sharply humorous (e.g.
Hudba pro přeladěné nástroje/Music for Retuned
Instruments).
The Brno school continued in its activities. The
older generation moved on to new projects, e.g.
M. Štědroň cooperated with avant-garde theatre
Divadlo na provázku/Theatre on a String and with a
younger composer Ivo Medek (*1956) like another
Brno composer Peter Graham (Jaroslav Štastný,
*1952) One of Ivo Medek’s particular interests has
been improvisation.
CZECH MUSIC GUIDE
27
The tradition of chamber music continued to
develop. Many young ensembles won awards
in international competitions. This period saw
the founding of the Kubín, Kocián, Doležal and
Pražák string Quartets (1972), the Kroft and
Sedláček Quartets (1974), the Havlák, later
Martinů Quartet (1976), the Stamitz Quartet
(1985), the Wihan Quartet (1988), the Škampa
Quartet (1989), the Prague Guitar Quartet (1984),
the Adamus Trio (ob., vn/vla, piano, 1985), the
Wind ensemble Academia (1971), and the Prague
Marimba Trio (1981), while the ensemble In modo
camerale was formed from some of the best
Czech soloists: J. Brožová-ob., L. Peterková-cl.,
J. Kubita-bs., D. Wiesner-piano.
The leading ensembles in the interpretation of historical music were Musica antiqua Prague (1982)
headed by Pavel Klikar and the Schola Gregoriana
Pragensis headed by David Eben (since 1987).
Before 1989 Agon Orchestra was an ensemble that
came together on an occasional, flexible basis but
systematically performed new Czech and foreign
music, primarily American Minimalism.
In Brno starting in 1987, the Exposition of New
Music festival and the ensemble Art Incognito (later transformed into the DAMA DAMA percussion
ensemble) have been the main channels bringing interesting contemporary music into Czech
musical life.
The tradition of choral music was reinforced by
the newly founded successful boy´s choir Boni
pueri (since 1982), the children’s choir Jitro from
Hradec Králové (1973) and others.Operatic life
rather stagnated during the 1970s and 80s.
In the 70th a strong generation of top performers
started their career: violinists Bohuslav Matoušek
(*1949), Čeněk Pavlík (*1955), Václav Hudeček
(*1952), and distinguished wind players: e.g.
Vladislav Kozderka-tr. (*1947), Jan Adamus-ob.
( *1951), Zdeněk Divoký-horn (*1954) and Zdeněk
Šedivý-tr. (*1956), Miroslav Kejmar (*1941). Czech
music life was also represented by organist Kamila Klugarová (*1948), pianists Božena Steinerová (*1947), Ivan Klánský (*1948) and František
Maxián (*1950) and many others.
The 1980s brought acclaim particularly for the cellists Michal Kaňka (*1960),and Michaela Fukačová
(*1959) currently living in Denmark, Jiří Hanousek
(*1961), violinist Ivan Ženatý (*1962) and hornist
Jindřich Petráš (*1961), pianists Jan Simon (*1966),
and Igor Ardašev (*1967). Gabriela Beňačková
(*1947), Jana Jonášová (*1943), Ivan Kusnjer (*1951)
D. Pecková
E. Urbanová
I. Loudová
S. Bodorová
Concert Life, Ensembles and Soloists
28
A SHORT HISTORY OF MUSIC
and Miroslav Kopp (*1955) represented the middle
generation of opera and concert singers. The top
Czech mezzosoprano Dagmar Pecková (*1961),
soprano Eva Urbanová (*1961) and tenor Štefan
Margita (*1956) started their careers during this
period.
Pop and Jazz, the Political Role
of Alternative Bands
in the Seventies and Eighties
After the invasion of Czechoslovakia by Warsaw
Pact troops in August 1968, many talented
musicians emigrated to Western countries (Successful emigrants included pianist Jan Hammer
(*1948) who worked with Sarah Vaughan, Mahavishnu Orchestra, Mick Jagger and others, the
bass players Miroslav Vitouš (*1947) who founded Weather Report (with Chick Corea) and
George Mráz (*1944), and the guitarists Ivan Král
(*1948) who has worked with musicians around
the famous club CBGB and with Patti Smith,
and Rudy Linka (*1960). Linka’s trio is one of the
most famous jazz ensembles in the USA.
Alongside the the official “normalised” culture,
which tended to consist at best of competent
musicians without higher artistic or critical aspirations, there were also some musicians who
refused to accept the conditions of the regime
during the 1970s and played what was known as
“underground”; the most famous underground
band was the Plastic People of the Universe,
J. Hammer
closely associated with the dissident community
known as Charta/Charter 77, DG 307 with leader
poet Pavel Zajíček emigrated to the USA and
cooperatedwith American quitar player Gary
Lucas.
In the 1980s the punk group Jasná páka, later
renamed Hudba Prague/Music Prague, was
in conspicuous opposition to official cultural
policy. The most ambitious Czech rock group
of the day was definitely Pražský výběr/Prague Selection led by Michael Kocáb and Michal
Pavlíček. Their LP Straka v hrsti/The Magpie in
the Palm of Hand was distributed illegally after
prohibition by the communist.
The Czechoslovak jazz tradition has been represented in this period for example by the Prague
Big Band of Milan Svoboda (*1951), the Traditional Jazz Studio of Pavel Smetáček (*1941)
and the Classic Jazz Collegium of Luboš Zajíček
(*1938) and others.
The top Czechoslovak jazz musicians in the
1980s included pianists and keyboardists Karel
Růžička (*1940), Emil Viklický (*1948) often cooperate with bassist Jaromír Honzák (*1959), Martin Kumžák (*1966), and blues guitarist Luboš
Andršt (*1948) who founded Luboš Andršt
Blues Band in 1981. L. Andršt cooperated in the
Blues Band with top Slovak jazzman Peter Lipa
(*1943). Another Slovak jazz-rock keyboard
player – Marián Varga (*1947) often cooperated
with Czech musicians and has influenced many
of them e.g. the famous rock and folk guitarist Radim Hladík (*1946), who founded a well
known group Blue Effect with Vladimír Mišík
(*1947) that is still active.
The Czechoslovak Jazz Society represented
a platform of political and culture opposition to
the socialist regime on a nationwide basis.
The new ensemble Baroque Jazz Quintet
founded by clarinettist Jiří Hlaváč and keyboard player and composer Eduard Spáčil played
on the style border between jazz and classical music. Jazzman Martin Kratochvíl (*1946),
founder of the group Jazz Q, and future owner
of label Bonton was also a successful author of
film music.
Pavel Klikar (*1954) is among the most inspired
musicians in the Czech Republic and not only for
his contributions to historically authentic interpretation of old Czech music with his ensemble Musica antiqua Prague. He also founded an ensemble
for the authentic interpretation of American jazz
and band dance music of the 1920s and 30s – the
Original Prague Syncopated Orchestra (founded
in1974), and he has personally restored hundreds
of original pieces of music. Ondřej Havelka (*1954)
and his Melody Makers become his followers.
CZECH MUSIC GUIDE
I. Král / by Robert Tichý
P. Klikar
During the 1970s, folk music and its festivals
(e.g. Porta) also played a political role as platforms for more or less overt protest against
the official culture - e.g. Vladimír Mišík (*1947),
Dagmar Andrtová-Voňková (*1948). Jarek Nohavica (*1953) and Pavel Dobeš (*1949) closely
associated with the special atmosphere and
dialect of the industrial city of Ostrava. Pavel
Dobeš used the protest-song form to attack the
political evils of the time. By contrast, the group
Fleret (since 1982, now cooperating with the famous Czech folk-singer Jarmila Šuláková) used
dialect as an attractive element of local-colour
aesthetics. The distinctive poetry of Karel Plíhal
(*1958) made him the interesting singer-songwriter that he remains today. Zuzana Navarová
(1959–2004) and her group Nerez opened up
the new style of world music for Czech audiences, as did multi-instrumentalist and composer
Jan Hrubý (*1948), an inspired musician who
was to be important in various future projects.
Olympic became one of must popular pop rock
group resperesented especially by quitarist and
singer Petr Janda.
During the 1980s he was involved in mixed style
groups such as ETC, and Framus V with Michal
Prokop (*1946), Blues Band with L. Andršt, but
29
then turned to Celtic rock style (group Kukulín).
The folk-rock group Marsyas founded by Oskar
Petr and, later headed by Zuzana Michnová
(*1949) initially co-operated with jazzmen M.
Kocáb, O. Soukup and J. Hrubý, and was a top
group on the Czech pop scene of the time.
Pop-rock was jazzed up by singer Bára Basiková
(*1963) singing in the groups Precedens, Stromboli, Abraxas and Laura a její tygři/Laura and
her Tigers. MCH Band (playing since 1982) was
founded by multi-instrumentalist, particularly
saxophonist and singer Mikoláš Chadima (*1952)
who represents a new fusion style.
In 1985, the group Už jsme doma known abroad
as UJD was founded and it drew from a punk
style. Jablkoň (playing since 1977) ranks among
very creative alternative groups as well.
30
CONTEMPORARY MUSICAL LIFE
CONTEMPORARY
MUSICAL LIFE
THE YOUNG GENERATION OF
CZECH COMPOSERS – SINCE 1989
The Velvet Revolution of November 1989 meant
the beginning of a new period in contemporary
Czech music. Its institutional basis has been
transformed and privatised. Many societies,
agencies, labels and foundations have been reestablished or founded (more details below).
Composers have come together in numerous
associations – e.g. Ateliér 90 (M. Kopelent,
Z. Matějů, B. Řehoř, M. Marek, V. Matoušek, S.
Smejkalová ad.), the revived Music department
in Umělecká Beseda/Art Party (L. Matoušek,
Jan F. Fischer, S. Havelka, J. Klusák, Z. Lukáš, A.
Piňos, P. Pokorný, B. Řehoř, L. Sluka, Z. Šesták, H.
Bartoň, P. Graham, M. Haase, I. Kurz, I. Loudová,
M. Slavický a.o.), the Association of Musicians
and Musicologists with the Society of Composers (about 100 members), the SAI/Society of
Authors and Performers and others.
Members of the older and middle generation of
composers who had often been pushed to the
margins of official culture under the communists have been able to work and develop freely.
Lading figures among them include Marek Kopelent, Jan Klusák, Milan Slavický, Ivana Loudová,
Ivan Kurz, Sylvie Bodorová, Ivo Medek, Peter
Graham and Martin Smolka. During the 1990s
Sylvie Bodorová (*1954) became one of the most
frequently performed composers on the current
music scene. Pavel Zemek (*1957) has become
a notable composer of his generation with his
remarkable solo compositions for various instruments and orchestral compositions.
The younger generation of artists orientated to
New Music has founded new platforms. Beside
the existing Agon Orchestra, important examples
are MoEns founded in 1995 by Prague group of
composers and performers M. Pudlák, H. Bartoň
and K. Doležal (until 2001 Mondschein Ensemble), and the ensemble Aleatore (since 1997),
ARTN (founded by Roman Z. Novák in 1997),
ensemble Resonance (since 1998, founded by
Michal Macourek, Petr Pokorný, Monika Knoblochová), Ensemble 108 Hz (since 2001, founded by
Petr Bakla, Vladislav Matoušek, Martin Cikánek),
Tuning Metronomes (founded 2001 by Michal
Trnka, finished), Why not Patterns (founded in
2002 by Miroslav Pudlák, Kamil Doležal and Michal Nejtek), Konvergence (since 2002, founded
by Tomáš Pálka, Ondřej Štochl, Martin Pallas),
ensemble Early Reflections (founded in 2003 by
Michal Trnka and Sylva Smejkalová). This entire
group of ensembles was born as a self-help
service for a new generation of composers for
performing of their own works and works of
authors similar to their style.
The work of composers who have started their
careers since 1989 has been very diverse in style.
Among composers close to the Agon specialising
in New Music there has been an inclination to
Minimalism or a mix of styles with New Romanticism, rock or jazz, od combination of classical
music with industrial, electro etc.. The most prominent of these composers working with Agon
is Martin Smolka (*1959) who composed many
orchestral and chamber works with individual instrumentation, and in 2004 wrote the ice-hockey
opera Nagano, which had a great impact with
its musical and verbal energy and humour. The
internationaly successful representant of a mixed
style (contemporary classical, industrial, electroacoustic, dark ambient) is Vladimír Hirsch (*1954,
compositions: Ecce crux, Catharsis, Confiteor,
Third Eye etc.)
The youngest generation has been fully integrated into the international music scene. Michal
Nejtek (*1977), author of the successful chamber opera Dementia Praecox (2001) and many
chamber pieces e.g. Sestup do hlubin ticha/
Descent to the Depth of Silence (1999), has obtained many important commissions from abroad
(The Warsaw Autumn Festival, Donauschinger
Musiktage). Vít Zouhar (*1966) combines Minimalism with historical styles (Classicism, Baroque),
for example in his opera Coronide (2000). Tomáš
Hanzlík (*1972) has used a similar approach, e.g.
in his Neo-Baroque opera Yta Innocens (2003),
both cooperate with Ensemble Damian. Kryštof
Mařatka (*1972) is living in France where his
compositions are performed and are winning
him a good reputation. He focuses particularly
on acoustic and technical details and special
effects for example in his piano quartet Exaltum (1998) or piece for cello Voja Cello (1999).
Ondřej Adámek (*1979) is one of must interesting
composers of the younger generation. He has
also studied in Paris and his work has been often
played in France e.g. Eclats de Gamelan (1005)
for symphonic orchestra, Rapid Eyes Movements
(2005) for string quartet and electronic (2005),
Night in Daylight for players and electronic
CZECH MUSIC GUIDE
M. Nejtek
O. Adámek
31
The film music is still important in the Czech
Republic and has been internationally acclaimed
since the 1960s. Jan Jirásek (*1955), a member of
a younger generation of film music composers
with Czech and foreign awards, received „Czech
Lion“ for music for Nejasná zpráva o konci
světa/An Ambiguous Report About the End of
the World (directed by J. Jakubisko, 1997) and
Kytice/Wild Flowers (inspired by K. J. Erben,
directed by F.A. Brabec, 2000); he cooperated
with jazz rock author Ondřej Soukup (*1951) and
received an award in Japan in 2010 for music
to N. Bergman‘s movie Intimate Grammar. O.
Soukup has cooperated with foreign producers
and he composed music for about 20 films, e.g.
BBC-produced Forgotten Men, Kolya, Tmavomodrý svět/Dark Blue Worldand Vratné lahve/
Empties directed by J. Svěrák. Michael Kocáb
(*1954) composes music with a specific sense for
an interesting topic and specific expression. He is
the author of music for animated Krysař/The Pied
Piper (1985), V Chytilová‘s horror Vlčí Bouda/
Wolf‘s Hole (1986) and co-production movie
Král zlodějů/King of Thieves (directed by I. Fila,
2004). Aleš Březina (*1965) has composed music
for 18 movies, especially for J. Hřebejk‘s films e.g.
Musíme si pomáhat/Divided We Fall from 2000,
Kawasakiho růže/Kawasaki Rose with music appreciated at the European Film Awards in 2009)
or for Menzel‘s film Obsluhoval jsem anglického
krále/I Served the King of England from 2006.
(2004). He also won an award in the competition
Musica nova for his electro-acoustic composition
Střepy z Kibery/Fragments from Kibera (2002).
Yet another composer to have studied in Paris
is Miroslav Srnka (*1975). He has an impressively
growing and consistent output. He is frequently
commissioned to write pieces for top international ensembles (InterContemporain, Itineraire
and others), and his many chamber compositions include e.g. Cherchant for kettledrums
and orchestra, Waiting with Myself for cello and
orchestra). Petra Gavlasová (*1976), Kateřina
Růžičková (*1975) and Sylva Smejkalová (*1974)
are interesting Czech women composers who
have been successful in electro-acoustic music
competitions for example. They have worked
abroad as well as at home, like Michal Rataj
(*1975), and in general the opportunities for
travel and mobility represent a new reality in the
practice of Czech musical life.
Concert Life – Operatic and Orchestral
Repertoire, Chamber Music,
and Soloists
V. Zouhar
Since 1989 Czech opera has renewed its contacts
with the Western international scene. The former
censorship of famous Czech artists living and working abroad (e.g. singers Jarmila Novotná, Soňa
Červená, Ludmila Novotná, composer Jan Novák
and Karel Husa, conductors Rafael Kubelík, Jiří
Kout, Martin Turnovský, Zdeněk Mácal and others)
has vanished. The traditional organisational and
repertory model of opera houses has remained
essentially unchanged as a result of economic
pressures and conservative audiences, but one
adventurous line of repertory has opened up in the
form of original premieres of foreign and Czech
operas (especially under directors Daniel Dvořák
and Jiří Nekvasil in the private Opera Furore, opera
Mozart, and later at the State Opera and the National Opera). One composer specialising primarily
in film and ballet music, Zbyněk Matějů (*1958),
has attracted attention with his ballets Komboloi
(1997), Ezio and the children’s ballet Čaroděj ze
země OZ/Wisard of OZ (1998).
32
CONTEMPORARY MUSICAL LIFE
Miloš Štědroň and Ivo Medek have composed
stage music such as Případ Cage, aneb Anály
avantgardy dokořán/The Cage Affair, or The
Annals of the Avant-garde Flung Open.
Some younger composers have been showing
great interest in opera (M. Smolka, M. Nejtek, T.
Hanzlík, V. Zouhar, M. Pudlák –see above). Their
operatic works have been presented for example
in the cycle Banging on the Iron Curtain (first at
The State Opera, then at The Estates Theatre).
Since the 1990s, repertoire has been enlarged
to include half-forgotten Czech works e.g.
Fibich´s Šárka, Foerster´s Bloud/The Simpleton,
Ostrčil´s Kunálovy oči/Kunal´s Eyes in Pilsen,
Burian’s Bubu of Montparnasse at the Prague
State Opera, the creations of the so-called Terezin composers (Pavel Haas, Hans Krása, Victor
Ullmann – all imprisoned in Terezin by the Nazis)
and many contemporary works, for example the
cycle of Minimalist operas at the State Opera
Prague. Many directors based abroad have
worked as guests of the National Theatre: e.g.
David Pountney, David Radok, Robert Wilson and
others.
In the years 1948–89, the repertoire of the so-called state orchestras was supervised by the political authorities, and performance of music from
abroad was restricted not only for economic
reasons but on ideological grounds. Before 1989
the compositions of contemporary emigrants,
people who were not members of the Unions of
Composers or were dissidents were excluded
from concert life, even though otherwise contemporary Czech music was generally supported.
The most interesting orchestras in the former
period were the Czech Chamber Philharmonic
Orchestra Pardubice led by conductor Libor
Pešek (*1933) in 1970–77 and the Brno State
Philharmonic, especially under the baton of Jiří
Bělohlávek (*1946) and František Jílek (1913-93).
After 1989, only one new professional chamber
orchestra with permanent employees has been
established. This has been the Prague Philharmonia conducted by Jiří Bělohlávek, and since its
founding 1994 it has gradually acquired a worldwide reputation.
Many conductors working abroad have returned
to the Czech Republic (Rafael Kubelík, Jiří Kout,
Libor Pešek, Martin Turnovský, and Zdeněk Mácal)
and filled prestigious positions in current musical
life (e.g. Z. Mácal as chief conductor of the Czech
Philharmonic Orchestra, J. Kout as chief conductor
of Prague Symphony Orchestra FOK).
With the abolition of censorship of repertoire
after 1989, some composers of the older generation have made a full return to concert life with
K. Mařatka
Z. Mácal
major compositions: e.g. M. Kopelent with the
oratorio Lux mirandae sanctitatis (1994), Arííjah
(1996), A Dimmed Voice about the Level of Calm
(2000); M. Slavický with Porta coeli, 1991, Two
Chapters of the Apocalypse, 1995, Requiem for
soloists, choir and Orchestra, 2001 and Morning
Thanksgiving, 2002; From younger generation
S. Bodorová with the oratorio Juda Maccabeus
(2002) reached success. Pavel Zemek received
the L. Janaček Prize for his contemplative work
the Passion after St. John (1990-97). Many of
these compositions have a spiritual orientation.
Younger composers (Martin Smolka, Martin
Marek, Vít Zouhar, Roman Z. Novák, Sylva Smejkalová, Ondřej Adámek, Miroslav Srnka, Kateřina
Růžičková, Petra Gavlasová and others) have also
started to contribute to this genre of music (see
above).
New ensembles focusing on performance of
contemporary music have been founded – e.g.
MoEns, Art Incognita later Dama Dama, Tuning
Metronomes, Berg orchestra and Ensemble 21,
Orchestra and Collegium Atlantis (con. V. Podrazil) and others (see more detailed information
above). The revived international competition
Musica nova presents the electro-acoustic music
of top foreign and Czech authors.
Classical music is also being cultivated by more
traditional ensembles such as Czech Trio, string
Janáček Quartet, Czech Nonet and others and
by new ensembles of a high artistic level. The
latter include the wind Afflatus Quintet (1995),
the string quartets the Apollon Quartet (1993),
the Eberle Quartet (1993) – which performs
in England and works with many top English
ensembles and orchestras, the Zemlinsky Quartet
(1994, up to 2005 performing as Penguin Quartet), the female Kaprálová Quartet (1995), the
Bennewitz Quartet (1998), the female Artemiss
Trio (vn., vla, piano,1995), and the young Pavel
Haas Quartet (2002) which won many important
CZECH MUSIC GUIDE
33
international prizes such as the Grampophone
Award (2011). The Collegium Marianum (1990),
Collegium 1704 (1991), Musica florea (1992), Ritornello (1993), the Ensemble Damian (1995) and
the Tourbillon Ensemble (1998) are the leading
groups devoted to the interpretation of Early
Music.
The international Concertino Praga and Prague
Spring competitions have helped launch the
careers of many young musicians: e.g. violinists
Gabriela Demeterová (*1968, also a winner at
the Y. Menuhin competition in England), Pavel
Šporcl (*1963, both recording for Supraphon
label) and Silvie Hessová, who works with the
Virtuosi di Praga, violinist Pavel Eret (*1967).
The period since 1989 has been fertile in good
pianists such as Martin Kasík (*1976), winner at
the Young Concert Artists Competition New York
1999, Adam Skoumal (*1969) also a winner at the
Young Podium Festival in Karlovy Vary and laureate of many other international competitions
abroad, the younger Miron Šmidák (*1980), winner of several international competitions such as
the Concertino Praga, Smetana Piano Competition, European Music Prize for Youth, Gustav
Mahler Piano Competition, Martinů Piano Competition and others, pianist Ivo Kahánek (*1979).
The youngest acclaimed performer is Lukáš
Vondráček (*1986), who at only 19 has visited 21
countries giving about 750 concerts; the Czech
Republic can also boast a strong generation
of wind players, among them clarinetist Kamil
Doležal (*1957) who specialises in contemporary
music, oboist Jana Brožková (*1968) a laureate
first of the Concertino Praga Competition in
1983, and then of the Gillet Competition in USA
in 1997 and is a member of the Afflatus Quintet,
bassoonist Jaroslav Kubita (*1966), laureate of
The Artemis Trio
J. Bělohlávek
many foreign competitions, a member of the
Czech Wind Harmony and In modo camerale
ensembles, the acclaimed Czech hornist Radek
Baborák (*1976) who has played as a soloist
in many Czech and foreign orchestras and has
won international awards not only at the Prague
Spring Competition, but also the UNESCO,
ARD, Mostly Classic Awards and others, and
the most highly rated young Czech clarinetist
Ludmila Peterková (*1967), violoncellist Tomáš
Jamník (*1985) and many others. Top percussionist Tomáš Ondrušek (*1964) former member
of Percussion Ensemble Stuttgart has performed around the world, and holds workshops
especially in Germany and Russia. He has been
a permanent le member of the Agon Orchestra.
Name yet some other laureats of Prague Spring
International Competition after 1990: oboists
Zbyněk Müller (in 1996), Vladislav Borovka (in
2002), clarinetists Kateřina Náchová (in 2022),
Karel Dohnal (2002), bassoonists Ondřej Roskovec (in 1996), Václav Vonášek and Tomáš Františ
(in 2002), violinists Hana Kotková (in 1997) and
Roman Patočka (in 2003, he received also W. A.
Mozart award), organists Pavel Černý (in 1994),
Petr Čech (in 2006), from string quartets Nostitz
Quartet (in 1998).
The Moravian agency ArsKoncert is one of the
biggest private agencies working for leading
symphony orchestras, choirs (Czech Philharmonic Choir Brno), and artists of all generations
and not only of Czech origin: e.g. conductors
Zdeněk Mácal (*1936, former chief conductor
34
CONTEMPORARY MUSICAL LIFE
M. Kasík
P. Šporcl
M. Kožená
J. Boušková
of the Czech Philharmonic Orchestra) Caspar
Richter (*1944, conductor of Brno Philharmonic Orchestra, director of Vereinigte Bühnen in
Vienna), the award-winning young Canadian
conductor Charles Olivier-Munroe working with
the Teplice orchestra and others, singers such
as the sopranos of the middle generation Eva
Dřízgová-Jirušová, Simona Houda-Šaturová,
and Helena Kaupová, and younger generation
– the mezzosoprano Karla Bytnarová, the alto
Jana Štefáčková, the tenor Jan Vacík, Slovak-born basses Gustáv Beláček and the older
Peter Mikuláš and the Moravian Richard Novák.
The most interesting musicians represented
by this agency also include the cellist Michaela
Fukačová, pianist Igor Ardašev, Jan Simon and
others.
The cream of the younger generation of performers is represented by the agency C.E.M.A.
(Central European Music Agency): e.g. famous
mezzo-soprano Magdalena Kožená (*1973) who
has received many prestigious prizes including
the British Gramophone Award and title Artist
of the Year 2004 awarded by Gramophone, the
soprano Martina Janková who has been a soloist
with the Zurich Opera since 1998, the baritone
Roman Janál (*1964), the pianist Karel Košárek
who has been awarded prizes in in many international competitions
(Hradec Králové, in Italy, USA, two prizes of
Meadows Foundation), the excellent harpist
Jana Boušková who is a laureate of the most
prestigious competitions in CR, USA, Israel, Switzerland, France and Italy, the violist Alexander
Besa (*1971) who now lives in Switzerland and
has won competitions in the CR, Switzerland
and Italy, and the cellist Jiří Bárta (1964) who
has received many prizes especially for his
recordings. Another excellent harpist, Kateřina
Englichová (*1969) has won prestigious international competitions in the U.S.A. and Italy, pianist
Martin Kasík (*1977) has received many awards
(including the Prague Spring, Davidoff Prix and
Prize for Young Concert Artists in New York)
and young talented violist Jitka Hosprová (*1975)
are represented by a private agency, Arco Diva,
which specialises in quality classical Czech music and the young generation of interpreters.
The cellist and member of the traditional Czech
Trio, Jan Páleníček, has founded an agency and
recording label called Triart Management oriented to the support of top Czech young artists.
Apart from himself, of course, it represents such
promising musicians as Zdeňka Kloubová, a soprano who works with many foreign ensembles
and opera companies, the pianist Jitka Čechová
(*1971), one of the best young Smetana interpreters, the violist Jana Vonášková-Nováková
(*1979)– laureate of many international competitions including the European Prize in Strasbourg
and London Young Concerts Artists Trust Prize,
the bassoonist Václav Vonášek (*1980), a laureate of competitions in Australia and Poland as
well as the Prague Spring Competition, the harpsichordist Monika Knoblochová (*1975) who is
among the most interesting young interpreters
of Early Music, as indeed is gambist Petr Wagner
(*1969), a founder of the prestigious Tourbillon
Ensemble (since 1998) focused on the music of
the 17th and 18th centuries.
Agency Paganini-Arts represents further young
artists such as mezzo-soprano Edita Adlerová
(*1971), percussionist Markéta Mazourová (*1974),
violoncellist Petr Šporcl (*1969) and violinist Jiří
Vodička (*1988).
Agencies P&P Art Agency and ArsKoncert represents also many Czech artists and ensembles
(see chapter Agencies and Links).
Tomáš Netopil, Jakub Hrůša and Zbyněk Müller
are all promising young conductors. Tomáš
Netopil (*1975) studied not only in Prague but
also in Stockholm. He won a prize at the George
Solti competition and was engaged by the
Vienna Volksoper, recently the chief conductor
CZECH MUSIC GUIDE
35
the Folklore Association of the CR (e.g. European
Meeting of Folklore Ensembles, Brno International
Folk Festival, Folklore without Borders in Ostrava,
Prague Fair, Frýdek-Místek Folklore Festival, International Festival of Songs, Folklore and Dance in
Prague, Frenštát Festival, Haná Festival, Childern
Folklore Festival of Songs and Dances in Luhačovice and others).
It is very cheering that many festivals and ensembles, especially children groups have been
founded since 1989 not only in Prague but also in
smaller localities with a folklore tradition.
Pop music
Note:
The term “pop” should be understood here as a blanket term for all
genres of non-classical music (pop mainstream, all kinds of rock music,
country, alternative, jazz, dance music etc.) or more specifically as a
word meaning mainstream pop.
In this publication it has been used as broad term for non-classical
music.
J. Hrůša
of the Prague National Theatre Orchestra. Jakub
Hrůša (*1981) is a laureate of many competitions
(Prague Spring, Lovro Matačič). He has worked
with the Czech Philharmonic Orchestra, and the
National Theatre in Prague, and in 2005–6 he
became principal conductor of the B. Martinů
Philharmonic, main conductor of the Prague
Philharmonia and assistant to the principal conductor of the Orchestre Philharmonique de Radio
France, he was appointed the next music director
of the Royal Danish Opera and of the Royal Danish Orchestra, effective September 2013. Oboist
and conductor Zbyněk Müller was a laureate of
the Prague Spring Competition as an oboist in
1996. Recently, Zbyněk Müller has increasingly
dedicated himself to opera, he has been invited
to many famous opera houses and projects
Folklore, Contemporary Pop, and
New Styles on Offer
The change of political regime brought a restructuring of the legal, financial and organisational conditions in pop music as in other areas. The
communist regime had controlled and checked
on pop musicians through special commissions. Since 1989, by contrast, the main factors in
the life of popular music have been the media,
private clubs, competitions, festivals, recording
companies and distributors.
New private nationwide TV stations (Nova and
Prima), and private radio stations orientated
to different genres of pop – the first included t
e.g. Europe 2, Frequency 1, and later Radio Alfa,
Radio Blaník, Impulse and others - have been
established.
New private clubs e.g. Rock Café, Bunkr 7,
Akropolis in Prague, Stodolní in Ostrava have
been opened. Important jazz clubs in Prague of
this period are traditional popular jazz venues
such as Agharta, or newly opened Jazz Dock,
Jazz Time and Jazz Republic.
Folk since 1989
Folk music has developed especially on a nonprofessional basis. A professional service has been
provided by the National Institute of Folk Culture
in Strážnice (since 1946), which is also the organiser of the oldest folklore festival in the country
- in Strážnice, and by the NIPOS/ARTAMA / the
National Information and Consulting Centre for
Culture, both directed by Ministry of Culture. The
Ethnological Institute as a part of the Academy of
Sciences provides scholarly materials and debate.
During the summer about 35 folklore festivals are
organised on a regular basis, many of them by
M. Pavlíček
M. Kocáb / by T. Hudcovič
36
CONTEMPORARY MUSICAL LIFE
R. Hladík
M. Chadima
The national competitions Gramy of Pop Music,
later Angels, Czech Nightingale, and since 2004
The Czech Lands are Looking for Superstar [Pop
Idol], The Czech and Slovak Lands have a Talent
(since 2010) have supported or launched the
careers of many young artists.
Specialised journals such as Folklór/Folklore,
Rock& Pop, Folk& Country, UNI, and Ultramix, and
festivals such as Jazz Goes to Town in Hradec
Králové, Struny podzimu/ Strings of Autumn in
Prague, Stimul/Stimulus or Babel in the Archa
Theatre in Prague, Colours of Ostrava orientated
to world music, as well as the rock festivals Rock
for People in Hradec Králové, Open Air Music
Festival in Turnov, alternative festival Boskovice,
Industrial Festival in Olomouc and others have
reflected all areas of modern pop music.
The big international record companies Sony Music, EMI ČR, Polygram later as UMG, Warner Music
CR (Supraphon overtook the catalogue in 2010)
have entered the Czech music market. The old
traditional Czech publisher of classical and pop
music Supraphon has concentrated on traditional
established names drawn especially from its vast
archive. Czech Bonton fused with Sony Music
in 1991, the latter operating since 2003 as Sony
Music BMG Entertainment ČR since repurchase of
Bonton. The policies of Sony Music BMG are more
progressive than those of EMI ČR. The Czech label
Popron Music (founded 1990) is one of the larger
new Czech companies (and agency) orientated
to the pop mainstream.
Since 1991, national annual awards in pop music
have been made, first as the Czechoslovak Anniversary Czech Awards in 1991, then in the years
1992–2000 as the Gramy of Pop Music, and since
2001 as Anděl/Angel. These awards have reflected
the evolving style of the Czech pop music scene.
The boom in musicals, life has been bloom of musicals, alternative music, world music and dance
music/hip hop are all relatively new phenomena in
Czech musical life.
On the jazz scene saxophone player Robert
Balzar (1962), bassist Marcel Bárta (*1974,
Vertigo quintet, group Muff ), guitarist David
Dorůžka (*1980), keyboards player Jakub Zitko
(*1974, group NUO), composer and pianist Beata
Hlavenková (1978), pianist Vojtěch Procházka
(1981, VP Trio), organist Ondřej Pivec (* 1984)
represent some of many top young performers
of modern jazz. Swing singer and actor Ondřej
Havelka (*1954) founded his own swing band
Melody Makers in 1995. Singer and violinist Iva
Bittová (*1958) is uncrowned queen of alternative
music.
Many interesting Czech projects involving crossover, alternative, world and folk music has been
released, especially by the private label Indies
Records – e.g. Iva Bittová, her sister Ida Kellarová
(*1956), the singer-songwriter Radůza (*1973),
the world music groups Maraca, Koa and Traband, the crossover group Mashy Muxx, and the
folk ensemble Hradišťan with Jiří Pavlica (*1953).
Věra Bílá with Kale is an internationally acclaimed
Roma singer, while the electric folk band Czechomor is very popular within the Czech Republic.
Alternative music has been represented by
groups such as Jablkoň, Triny, -123 min. with
Zdeněk Bína, Tara Fuki, Koa, Ridina Ahmed
cooperating with Radim Hladík, nujazz group
Dekadent Fabrik (since 2009, combining jazz
with psychedelic repetitive minimalism and electro), group MCH Band founded in the 80s (both
groups are connected with the name of Mikuláš
Chadima) and others.
Dance music is strong on the X Production label
(e.g. the groups Moimir Papalescu& Nihilists,
Ecstasy of St. Teresa). The biggest festival of
hip hop in Central and East Europe takes place
A. Langerová
CZECH MUSIC GUIDE
37
musicals Krysař/The Pied Piper and Tajemství/
Mystery. Michal David (*1960), a hit-maker since
70s wrote musical Cleopatra and others
Promising groups include the international band
Monkey Business, the rock group Tata Bojs, Chinaski, Segment (a break-through in the competition Czech and Slovak Countries Have a Talent in
2011), in the past also the heavy rock band Lucie
(D. Koller, group finished).
L. Bílá
M. Chodúr
in Hradec Králové and it is organised by DEPO
CREW&BBARAK agency. Summer of Love, an
electro open air festival is one of the international formats that arrived to the Czech Republic.
The most successful Czech authors of musicals
have been Michael Kocáb (*1954) founder of the
group Pražský výběr, with his musical Odysseus
(1987), his colleague rock guitarist and composer
Michal Pavlíček (*1956) with his musical Excalibur
(2003) and many other stage projects (Minotaurus, the ballets Malý princ/A Little Prince, Zvláštní
radost žít/Special Enjoyment of Life. Former
hit-maker especially for Karel Gott and author
of film music Karel Svoboda (1938-2007) has
composed the musicals Dracula, Monte Cristo
and Golem (2006/7). Janek Ledecký (*1962),
a popular singer between 1992–2000 (e.g. in the
Czech Nightingale public survey) created the
musicals Hamlet (also performed in the U.S.A.)
and Galileo. Daniel Landa (*1968) has written the
The young generation in mainstream pop
includes several female singers who have been
performing since their childhood: singer and
actress Lucie Vondráčková (*1980), Tereza
Kerndlová (*1986), and Slovak-born singer Dara
Rollins (*1972), Lucie Bílá (*1966) and Leona
Machálková (*1967) belong to middle generation
of top woman musical and pop singers. Leading
male singers include Kamil Střihavka (*1965),
Dan Bárta (*1971), Dan Hůlka (*1968) and Petr
Kolář (*1968), all successful in musicals as well.
Iva Frülingová belongs to younger generation
of sngers working abroad (in France). The first
years of the TV competition The Czech Lands are
Looking for Super Star [Pop Idol] made a stars
out of the young songwriter Aneta Langerová
(*1986) who also won the Angel or singer Martin
Chodúr (*1989) who received Czech traditional
pop prize Gold Nightingale.
The biggest distributors of pop music in the
Czech Lands are Bontonland, Panther, Vltava,
Pohodlí, Czech business Classic Music Distribution and P&J Music, Polí5. The most interesting
indie agencies are Rachot (Palace Akropolis),
P&J (jazz, world, alternative), Roxy (Roxy Club)
in Prague, and Indies Scope in Brno, agency
Alternative Music Production (AMD) founded by
Roman Hanzlík, a former guitarist of alternative
group Už jsme doma. This agency organised
important export project of Czech alternative
groupes especially UJD titled Czech Music On
The Road (2001–10).
38
CURRENT CULTURE POLICY
CURRENT
CULTURE POLICY
CRUCIAL CHANGES IN CZECH MUSIC
LIFE AFTER 1989
1.
2.
3.
THE MINISTRY OF CULTURE
A historical overview of cultural administration
after the foundation of the modern nation state
Czechoslovakia in 1918
4.
1918–1942: Ministry of Education System
and National Public Education
1945:
Ministry of Education System
and Public Education
1953–1956: Ministry of Culture
(the culture sector now separated
from the education sector)
1956–1967: Ministry of Education and Culture
(the two sectors are re-united)
1967–69:
Ministry of Culture and Information
since 1969: Ministry of Culture
5.
6.
Freedom of expression
Creation of the legal conditions for the
growth of a private sector in culture
Privatisation of the recording and publishing
concerns Panton and Supraphon and the
agency Pragokoncert. Entry of new firms and
world labels on the Czech market (Monitor,
Bonton, Popron, Sony Music, BMG, EMI, PolyGram), foundation of many smaller independent labels and distributors
Transformation of festivals, theatres, orchestras and founding of new independent societies, Ltd. and non-profit private organisations
and activities
Reform of state administration, establishment of public grant system support for
professional and non-professional music
activities of all genres,
Multi-source financing of culture.
CURRENT CULTURAL POLICY AIMS
Since 1989, the state has declared a number of
main objectives:
1. To guarantee freedom of cultural production
and free access to culture for all citizens
2. The decentralisation of decision-making in
the cultural system
3. To guarantee protection of cultural heritage
4. To support education and enlightenment
5. To slow down the negative effects of cultural
commercialisation.
The Plan for Support of the Arts in the years
2007–13 was approved by the government in May
2006.
For more information see:
the Ministry of Culture: www.mkcr.cz
the Arts Institute: www.institutumeni.cz
MUSIC INSTITUTIONS / CZECH MUSIC GUIDE
MUSIC
INSTITUTIONS
OPERA HOUSES SINCE 1989
The existing network of theatres with opera
companies has been maintained. It includes:
The National Theatre and State Opera in Prague
(since 1992, the former Smetana Theatre and
Neues Deutsche Theater), since 2012 both theatres are in the administrative transformation, the
National Theatre in Brno with the Janáček Opera,
the Moravian-Silesian National Theatre in Ostrava
with the Antonín Dvořák Opera House, the J.K.Tyl
Theatre in Pilsen and the F.X.Šalda Theatre in
Liberec with music stages, the North Bohemian
Opera and Ballet Theatre in Ústí nad Labem,
the South-Bohemian Theatre in České Budějovice, the Moravian Theatre in Olomouc and the
Silesian Theatre in Opava with opera stages.
The following independent theatre companies
have also been established: Opera Furore, Opera
Mozart, the Orfeo Chamber Opera Brno, and the
Prague Children’s Opera. The system of financial
support has been transformed. Currently, local
town authorities are primarily responsible for
supporting and tuning theatres, and only the
National Theatre and State Opera are funded
directly by central government through the
Ministry of Culture. The government, the regions
and the private sector are now complementary
financial sources..
The Estates Theatre
39
40
MUSIC INSTITUTIONS
Some statistics
The following tables present data separately for state and private theatres and are derived from government sources.
Currently (2011), a so-called satellite bill for culture is being prepared (in cooperation with the Czech
Statistical Office, NIPOS-ARTAMA and the Arts and Theatre Institute) which will allow to create a more
accurate idea about macro-numbers in the sector. According to Czech Statistical Office‘s findings, the
public and private sector evenly participated in financing performing arts (about 8.6 billion CZK); an
important part of private sources is represented by household expences (about 2,4 billion CZK). The
ration of state and region expenses for culture is approximately 1:2 (about 4 billion CZK)
PUBLIC SECTOR:
NUMBER OF STAGES
In the year 2005
In the year 2009
Opera
1067
1 089
Small increase
Ballet
481
498
Small increase
2 920
2 572
885
724
18
78
133
172
Increase
588
475
Small decrease
Stagnation
Puppet show
Musical
Dance, motion theatre
Performances by visiting ccompanies
in the Czech Republic
Performances by Czech companies abroad
Trend
Decrease
Small decrease
(max. in the year 2007)
Significant increase
PLAYS IN REPERTORY
Opera
160
166
Operetta
46
61
Ballet
75
70
Small decrease
Puppet show
176
161
Small decrease
Musical
60
57
Stagnation
7
17
Significant increase
Dance
Increase
PREMIERES
Opera
160
166
Operetta
46
61
Ballet
75
70
Puppet show
176
161
Small decrease
Musical
60
57
Stagnation
7
17
Significant increase
78,7
81,3
Dance
Attendance rate in %
Stagnation
Increase
Small decrease
Small increase
CZECH MUSIC GUIDE
PRIVATE SECTOR:
(owned by civic associations, generally beneficial societies, enterpreneurs, churches etc.)
NUMBER OF STAGES
Opera
Operetta
Ballet
Puppet show
In the year 2005
In the year 2009
161
155
Trend
Decrease
0
22
Significant increase
67
83
Significant increase
Significant increase
1 971
3 270
Musical
665
634
Small decrease
Dance, movement theatre
808
798
Stagnation
137
151
Small increase
540
575
Small increase
Opera
11
15
Small increase
Operetta
0
2
Ballet
5
19
118
232
Musical
22
45
Significant increase
Dance, movement theatre
42
79
Significant increase
Opera
3
3
Stagnation
Operetta
0
2
Stagnation
Ballet
0
2
Stagnation
by visiting theatre companies from
abroad in CR
by Czech companies abroad
PLAYS IN REPERTORY
Puppet show
Stagnation
Increase
Significant increase
PREMIERES
Puppet show
14
26
Musical
4
9
Dance
14
25
No information
No information
Attendance rate in %
Significant increase
Increase
Significant Increase
The price of tickets varies from 100 CZK to 1 000 CZK (exclusively e.g. at festival periods prices are much higher (equivalent to1,000 USD).
41
42
MUSIC INSTITUTIONS
Commentary on the statistics
Orchestras and Choirs
Opera achieved a brief increase in the private
sector shortly after the political changes. Now it
is undergoing stagnation. Operetta has declined
quite rapidly, and has been replaced by the more
fashionable genre of musical, which experienced
a boom in the private sector, although it is currently stagnating. Now the operetta learned from
musicals and returned „on stage“ with innovated
means.
The genre of dance theatre has experienced a
significant upswing, especially in the area of modern dance (e.g. the international festival Dance
Prague) There has been an increase in alternative
or puppet theatre in the area bordering on the
commercial.
At the beginning, the number of stages visited
and performances given by Czech ensembles
abroad has increased rapidly, the export from
private activities have also developed.; the import of foreign ensembles has been limited until
now for financial reasons.
The network of so-called “state orchestras”
(three orchestras in Prague, one in Brno,
Ostrava, Olomouc, Hradec Králové, Pardubice, České Budějovice, Pilsen, Karlovy Vary,
Mariánské Lázně, Teplice) has been preserved.
Only one orchestra has been abolished (in spa
Poděbrady) and only one orchestra with permanent employees has been founded (Prague
Philharmonia in 1994). The orchestral network
is organised in the Association of Symphony
Orchestras and Choirs in CR (it also includes
two choirs – the Prague Philharmonic Choir and
the Czech Philharmonic Choir in Brno). Only
one orchestra – Czech Philharmonic Orchestra
has remained directly funded by the Ministry of
Culture. Since 2002, other former state orchestras have been supported from municipal and
complementary funds by regional authorities. A
growing number of new or transformed agency
orchestras (without stabile employees) have
appeared e.g. the Czech National Symphony Orchestra, the Czech Symphony Orchestra – former
Film and Symphony Orchestra and Czech Film
Orchestra cooperating with important recording
companies around the world. Former traditional top chamber orchestras have changed their
legal form (to Ltd., non-profit organisations or
associations). The main examples here are the
Czech Chamber Orchestra (founded by conductor Václav Talich in 1948), the Prague Chamber Orchestra (since 1952), the Suk Chamber
Orchestra (founded in 1974 founded by J. Suk),
and the Virtuosi di Praga (since 1990 founded by
O. Vlček). Some orchestral players have formed
smaller chamber ensembles affiliated to their
orchestras, and young soloists have created
ensembles orientated to contemporary or Early
Music (see above).
Rudolfinum
CZECH MUSIC GUIDE
Several bodies in Prague and regional theatres
operate in the Czech Republic (eleven orchestras and ten opera choirs).
Currently the total number of professional
bodies includes about 35 more important
symphony orchestras, 35 classical chamber
orchestras, 30 chamber string orchestras, 15
wind or jazz orchestras together with many
agency ensembles or soloist ensembles. Most of
players in these ensembles are recruited from
the players in stable orchestras. In comparison
with the situation abroad, the orchestras are
able to cover a relatively substantial proportion
of their costs from their own earnings (20–30%).
Concert attendance is still high, partly because
ticket prices remain comparable with cinema
tickets (around 150 Kč), except in the case of the
Prague orchestras.
The salaries of professional public orchestral players are a little below the average salary in the
CR (excluding top players in the Czech Philharmonic Orchestra).
The government Programme for support of
orchestras and choirs can provide funds for professional orchestras and choirs with permanent
employees but such funds represent only a small
supplementary part of their budget.
In the field of non-professional activities there
are small wind orchestras (ca 165), middle-sized
wind orchestras (25), large wind youth orchestras (45) and large wind orchestras for adults
(29) with a total of around seven thousand
players in all age categories. Once again the
largest number of ensembles is in the South Moravian and Moravian-Silesian Region. The wind
orchestras are associated in the Union of Wind
Orchestras of the CR.
Choral singing in the Czech Lands is traditionally of a high standard, even in largely
non-professional or semi-professional choirs,
several of which regularly work with professional
orchestras. One of the oldest and best-known
still active choirs is the mixed choir Hlahol, founded in 1861 in Prague, and another is the Beseda
Brněnská (since 1860, L. Janáček was its director
in his time) currently named the Brno Philharmonic Choir of the Brno Association (Beseda
brněnská in Czech). The third important still active choir is the Žerotín Academic Choir founded
in Olomouc in 1880. In 1903 the Choral Association of Moravian Teachers was founded and has
done a great deal to help create the tradition of
modern choral performance.
Traditionally the largest professional choir has
been the Prague Philharmonic Choir (known until 1969 as the Czech Choir) founded in 1935, The
43
Brno Czech Philharmonic Choir founded in 1990
is the other top professional choir.
Founded in 1958, the Kühn Mixed Choir is one of
the leading choirs of the Czech republic. It works
with leading orchestras and its achievements
include recordings of the complete choral works
of B. Martinů for Supraphon. There is also a very
high-quality choir conducted by Josef Pančík at
the National Opera in Brno.
Important non-professional and semi-professional choirs are associated under the umbrella
of the Union of Czech Choirs, which at present
brings together as many as 240 choirs, including
children’s choirs. Successful children’s choirs
include e.g. the Bambini di Praga (finished in
2010), Rolnička Praha, the Kühn Children’s Choir,
Cantilena in Brno, Severáček in Liberec and Boni
Pueri in Hradec Králové.
Among these top choirs there is a wide
spectrum of school choirs (approx. 500 with
about 20 000 children of from 6 to18 years old),
annually presented at the National Festival of
Children’s School Choirs held in different towns.
The number of smaller children’s folksong ensembles is increasing.
44
MUSIC INSTITUTIONS
Some statistics
While the total number of existing ensembles is relatively high (see above) only the relatively small
proportion represented by the most stable ensembles has been statistically monitored.
In the year 2005
In the year 2009
Concerts, in total
2 179
2 196
Small increase
Included chamber concerts of orchestras
and choirs
1 597
1 716
Small increase
443
271
Abroad for foreign organisers
394
403
Stagnation
Attendance in thousands
464
429
Small decrease
139
190
Increase
15
13
Concerts, in total
1 625
1 516
Included concerts of orchestras and choirs
1 234
1 147
Included chamber concerts
276
193
Decrease
Abroad for foreign organisers
Stagnation
Included chamber concerts
Recordings, in total
From that
Public music ensembles
(former state orchestras)
Trend
Decrease
Small decrease
Small decrease
224
214
Attendance in thousands
411
353
Decrease
Recordings, in total
58
84
Increase
17
17
Private music ensembles (monitored ones)
Concerts, in total
554
680
Included concerts of orchestras and choirs
70
87
Increase
Included chamber concerts
167
78
Abroad for foreign organisers
170
189
Attendance in thousands
53
76
Increase
Recordings
81
106
Increase
Small increase
Significant decrease
Small increase
Commentary on the statistics
The statistical data on concert life are very incomplete. Only the data about former state orchestras are
complete. We can see that after their transformation the former state orchestras after the period of increasing in all parameters (till 2005), they are rather in the period of stagnation or small decrease. The
increase in recordings has been conditioned by new technologies and the exploitation of the chance
ensembles now have to produce their own records.
The willingness of private ensembles to provide data depends on the possibility of obtaining public
state money.
Attendance at concerts of public ensembles is rather in decrease in compared to the attendance of
private ensembles. The age structure of audiences is not satisfactory, since the public is getting older
and the middle generation is missing.
CZECH MUSIC GUIDE
Festivals and Competitions in CR
In the Czech Republic, there are about 200 periodic stable festivals. A full number of registered
activities is much higher (about 1000).
Note:
The total number of activities registered at the Muzikontakt includes
some overlaps with the same event appearing as a different item in
different years and so on, which means that the statistics are not
entirely precise.
An increase in the number of many smaller
events has resulted from the public grant-in aid
system in CR since 1989, which gives preference
to special projects, and to the expansion of the
private organisation sector. A number of these
events is growing thanks to high activity of
the Folklore Association and non-professional
associations.
The Association of Music Festivals in the CR
founded in 1996 presently brings together 14
international festivals taking place in the CR:
Prague Spring Festival (since 1946, held in May/
June, with associated competition, org. by its
own agency), the oldest opera festival in the CR
Smetana‘s Litomyšl (since 1949, held in June, org.
by its own agency), Moravian Autumn in Brno
(since 1966, held in September/October, with
associated competition and festivals of contemporary and spiritual music, organised by the Ars
Koncert Agency), Janáček May in Ostrava (since
1975, held in May, org. by its own agency), Český
Krumlov Festival (since 1991, held in July/August,
organised by the Auviex Agency), the festival
organised in 13 Moravian and some cities abroad
Concentus Moraviae (since 1996, held in June/
July, organised by the International Centre of
Slavonic Music), the Organ Festival in Olomouc
(since 1968, held in September, organised by the
Moravian Philharmonic Olomouc), Mitte Europa
festival (since 1991, held in June/July, org. by its
own agency), the Strings of Autumn in Prague
(since 1996, held from September/ November,
org. by its own agency), the Emmy Destinn Festival in South Bohemia (since 1990, held in August/
September, org. by its own agency), Janáček’s
Hukvaldy (since 1994, held in July/August, organised by Foundation JH) and the Beethoven
Festival in Teplice (since 1964, held in May/June,
organised by the North-Bohemian Philharmonic
Orchestra), Mahler Jihlava Festival (since 2009,
held in May/July, organised by Arco Diva) and the
Harmonia Moraviae (since 1999, held in October,
organised by B. Martinů Philharmonic Orchestra). Festivals on this classical model usually last
about three weeks or longer and are located in
45
larger cities or historically attractive places. An
international format Prague PROMS appeared. It
is organized in summer especially for tourists by
the Czech National Symphony Orchestra. Czech
Radio and its festival Rozhlasový podzim/Radio
Autumn (since 2010) has linked to the former
festival Pražský podzim/Prague Autumn which
focused on presentation of foreign orchestras
with the Czech repertoire. However, the list of
classical music festivals is much longer. Other
important ones are Dvořákova Praha/Dvořák
Prague, Chopinův festival in Marienbad/Chopin
Festival, Martinů Fest and others.
Another new phenomenon has been partnership in EU projects e.g. Europalia and, Europa
musicale.
The majority of contemporary music festivals
take place in larger cities in March or November and December over just a few days. The
most interesting are the following: Exposition of
New Music (in Mars in Brno, org. by ArsKoncert
agency), Maraton (in November in Prague, org.
by Society for New Music, finished), Ostrava Days
associated with composing courses (in August
/September, org. by Ostrava Centrum of New
Music), the orchestral festival Prague Premieres
(in March in Prague, org. by Czech Philharmonic
Orchestra, 2004-9), established Struny podzimu
/Strings of Autumn in Prague, relatively new
Alternativa/Alternative and Babel in the Archa
Theatre, Contempuls, organised since 2008 by
Music Information Center in a relatively new
original industrial space La Fabrika in Prague,
the Prague Industrial Festival (in December in
Prague, org. by Ars Morta Universum Society).
Associations of composers organise the festival
Days of Contemporary Music in Prague, while the
Atelier group of composers organises the TřídeníThree-Day Festival (December, in Prague).
The most important festivals of Early Music
are the Summer Festival of Early Music that has
taken place in Prague since 1999 and is organised by Collegium Marianum-Týn School, the
Haydn Festival in Dolní Lukavice organised by
the Haydn Society since 1992 in September and a
section of the festival Mitte Europe. Many smaller
festivals are organised especially during summer
at historical sites – churches and castles.
The international competition and festival Praga
Cantat (since 1986), the choir festivals in Hradec
Králové (since 2003) and in Jihlava (since 1957),
the Festival of Songs in Olomouc (since 1971),
the Festival of Children and Youth and Festival of
Academical Choirs IFAS, both in Pardubice (since
1986), are the most interesting international choir
festivals in CR.
46
MUSIC INSTITUTIONS
The South-Bohemian Festival Concertino Praga
associated with the prestigious competition for
young artists organised by Prague Radio Concertino Praga (since 1968, in June), Young Smetana
Litomyšl organised by Jeunesses Musicales in
CR (since 1973, in September), Young Podium
organised by the Association of Music Artists
and Musicologists in Prague (1972-2009) and
the festival of chamber and orchestral concerts
Talentinum organised by the B. Martinů Philharmonic in Zlín (since 1970, in September/October)
are the most interesting festivals for young
artists. The festival Mozartiana Iuventus organised by the Bertamka Museum in September
since 1998 is naturally more specific in its focus.
Many other festival activities are organised for
pupils of s.c. Basic Arts Schools and amateurs (in
cooperation with the Ministry of Education and
NIPOS/ARTAMA).
International organ festivals and festival of
sacred or spiritual music are held in Olomouc,
Opava, Brno, Kroměříž and Prague, i.e. traditional
localities for religious music with many historical
monuments and churches: we should mention
the Organ Festival in Olomouc organised by the
Moravian Philharmonic Orchestra (since 1968, in
September), the Prague Audite Organum (since
1995, org. by its own agency). The Festival of
St. Wenceslas in Prague held during September
and organised by the Society for Spiritual Music
(since 1996), the Festival Forfest in the historical
and religious city Kroměříž organised since 1989
and Paschal Festival of Spiritual Music in Brno
are events with a more general religious accent.
American folk music has been a living tradition
in the Czech Lands for since the beginning of
the century. This interest is reflected in events
like the oldest bluegrass European festival Banjo
Jamboree organised since 1972 in Čáslav by the
Bluegrass Association in CR. Porta in Jihlava
(since 1966, in July). Mohelnický dostavník/Mohelnice Stage (since 1975, in region Olomouc)
and Zahrada/Garden in Náměšť nad Oslavou
(region Olomouc) organised since 1989. The
majority of such festivals are held during the
summer by small agencies.
Rock is an important minority genre. Festivals
under the frequent title “Rockfest“ are organised by small agencies mostly in smaller places
of the country. As elsewhere in the world, some
are associated with a social cause, e.g. Rock for
People (Prague, Hradec Králové), Rock again
Drugs.“Open air” rock festivals are also common.
The international Jazz Festival in Prague, held
since 1976 and currently organised by the
agency Pragoconcert, the International Jazz
Festival in Karlovy Vary (since 1981) and the jazz
seasons in Prague’s club Agharta are all now
traditional jazz events in the CR. The Czechoslovak Jazz Festival Přerov (since 1985, org. by
Foundation PJF), the International Jazz Festival
in Ústí nad Labem (in October) and Jazz Goes
to Town in Hradec Králové (since 1995, in October), Jazz na hradě/Jazz at the Castle in Prague
(since2005, organised by the Administration
of Prague Castle and PJ Music agency) are
more recently representative events with good
prospects.
Crossover festivals are on the increase. Here we
can identify two types: 1) essentially classical
festivals involving different branches of the arts
(music, dance, theatre, plastic art) and 2) festivals mixing many genres of music, often with
non-traditional presentation and alternative and
world music too.
The Mahler festival in Jihlava (since 2001, org. by
Arco Diva agency) is of the first type. Colours of
Ostrava has become the most prestigious Czech
international festival of world music (since 2001
in July, org. by Colours Production agency), and
among other crossover festivals we can mention
the Boskovice Festival and Alternativa Prague
organised by Unijazz since 1992 during July, Alternativa Brno (organised by Jiří Švéda agency)
and Stimul in Prague organised by His Voice
journal with alternative club NoD, Roxy and the
Prague theatre Archa.
Brass music festivals have been attracting more
attention from abroad than from domestic audiences. The most successful include the International Brass Band Festival in Prague and Vejvoda
Zbraslav Festival (both organised by specialised
agency Or-fea), Praveček Lanškroun – festival
of big brass bands (since 1977, org. by Culture Centre of the city), the FIJO-International
Festival of Brass Bands of Youth in Cheb (since
1989, org. by the City Administration Cheb) and
the International Festival of Brass Bands and
Folk Ensembles in Zlín (since 1995 org. by Music
Association Zlín).
The Strážnice Festival is the oldest folk festival in
CR (organised since 1946 in June). The majority
of folk festivals (in Frýdek Místek, Pilsen, Brno,
Bělohrad and others, see up) are organised by
the Folklore Association in the CR. This genre has
been experiencing an upswing in international
context.
Techno, electro and dance music festivals started in about 2000, and as examples we might
mention the Electro-Prague Festival in Mars, Hip
Hop festival in Hradec Králové and Vibrations
festivals, or international format Summer of Love
(since 1997, dance electro, in Pardubice), or beach open air festival Mácháč (since 2000).
CZECH MUSIC GUIDE
The Music Information Centre has registered
about 120 interpreting competitions and 22
competitions for composers.
The most interesting of the international competitions for performers include example the
Concertino Praga for young artists organised
by Czech Radio, the competition associated
with the Prague Spring Festival, the A. Dvořák
Competition in Karlovy Vary for opera singers,
the Emmy Destinn Competition organised at
the international platform (Prague/London), the
Smetana Piano Competition in Pilsen, the Kocián
Violin Competition in Ústí nad Labem, Beethoven
Hradec – a competition for young pianists, the
Heran Violoncello Competition in Ústí n. Orlicí,
the Carl Czerny Competition for young pianists
in Prague, the Virtuosi per Pianoforte in Ústí
nad Labem, the F. Chopin Piano Competition in
Mariánské Lázně, Talentinum Zlín, the choir competition Praga cantat and a special competition
in Melodrama genre in Prague. One special even
is a Competition for the Blind held during Mars in
Prague by the Association for the Blind.
In other genres, in addition to the competitions
in pop (Czech traditional prizes Nightingale,
Angel since 1998 and international formats:
Superstar, Czech and Slovak Lands Have a Talent) we might mention the the Competition for
Folksingers organised by the Folklore Festival in
Strážnice annually in June.
Only one international competition for composers is organised in CR, and this is Musica nova
(since 1969 with interruptions to 1993, org. by
Society for Electro-acoustic music). Every year
this competition attracts about 80-100 electroacoustic compositions from around 35 countries.
Other competitions are organised at the national
level (Generace/Generation), for amateurs (e.g.
in Jihlava) or with special orientation (organised
in Brno by the Multi-Art Association).
AGENCIES AND ORGANISERS
IN THE CR
Conditions on the Czech Music
Market
In the field of classical music the Czech music
market is relatively small and financially weak.
After the loss of its monopoly the state agency
Pragokoncert (which continues to be relatively
insignificant) acts as agent for large publicly
co-funded institutions (professional symphony
orchestras, international festivals) with the
capacity to engage important foreign musicians
including consultancy, while on the other hand
47
there are private agencies, of which the biggest
and most reliable with a knowledge of quality in
the classical music field are ArsKoncert (Brno),
C.E.M.A.-Central European Music Agency (Brno),
Arco Diva Managment(Prague) and Triart Management (Senohraby) are associated with the
Association of Artistic Agencies in CR (ASUMA),
we can also list: Aura Pont (Prague), Auviex
(Prague), Paganini-Arts (Prague and BVA Intl.
(Prague), which have the legal status of limited
companies. In addition, since 1989 numerous
smaller agencies (1–2 people), have emerged, for
example Bellamaya.cz, Euroart Prague, Czech
Art, P&P Art Agency (Prague) Agency Clavis
(Prague), Trifolium (Česká Lípa, LR) and others.
A range of cultural agencies are also operating
here without specific specialisations in terms of
genre and without knowledge of the quality of
the musical environment.
In the modern pop and jazz,the significant agencies are Rachot, which creates programmes for
the important venue at the Akropolis in Prague,
P&J which is orientated to jazz and the alternative scene, the Roxy Agency which works for the
alternative Prague venue the Roxy Club, Indies
in Brno, then 2HP Production, 10:15 Management,
Ameba Production, Obscure Promotion, Media
and production agencies directly connected with
specialized festivals such as: Colours Production,
Bludný kámen/Boulder, Blues Alive, Bohemia
Jazz Production, Pragokoncert Bohemia and
many others.
In the Czech Republic, there are also some
commercial international agencies oriented on
the production of star concerts such as: WTF
Entertainement, Live Nation, Makroconcert,
Charm Music. In relation to the Czech market
intermediary agencies, which merely represent
or offer musicians and ensembles, need to be
distinguished from agencies, which actually
organise events.
Czech law does not make a precise distinction
between the non-profit and profit sector in the
area of private law (all limited companies belong
to the profit sector, but there is no legislative
barrier to multi-source financing, commercial
legal subjects can ask for public money for special projects) although rather long-term major
projects (e.g. international festivals or established organisations with long-term public funding
such as the National Theatre, Czech Philharmonic, Prague Spring) have an easier time getting
private sponsorship than projects initiated from
the independent private sector. Projects in the
independent sphere are therefore often forced
to compromise and adapt to the expectations
of the public. Paradoxically, established public
48
MUSIC INSTITUTIONS
organisations are in a better position to pursue
adventurous programmes with important foreign
musicians.
Among festivals in the private sector those that
have made the greatest impact have been the
IMF Prague Autumn (since 1990), the Český
Krumlov IMF (since 1991, Auviex Agency), and
the Concentus Moraviae IMF (since 1996, International Centre for Slavonic Music), while in the
field of performing arts involving music projects
in all genres including classical music as one element, it is the Archa Theatre (founded in 2002)
with a regular subsidy from the city authority,
that has achieved the most visible success. The
projects of most of the non-profit civic associations, by contrast, are struggling with a lack of
funding, especially since the cutbacks in support
for art projects from a number of foreign foundations that had intervened on the Czech music
scene after 1989 to encourage the development
of independent, non-commercial culture (the
Open Society Fund Prague, Pro Helvetia and
others), however they finished their activities for
now. The non-profit organisations cannot therefore afford high quality agency representation,
and this has a deleterious effect on the prospects
for the development of their projects.
for a performance and resale of the original of
an art work. 2–5% of the retail value of a work is
payable to the collective administrator. Licencing
fees for copyright works are much higher.
The government and regional authority grant
system is available only to Czech subjects, including private subjects, and so co-organisation
with a Czech partner is a definite advantage for
any project. Another possible source of funding
for domestic organisers are the transformed
or new music funds: the Czech Music Fund
Foundation, the Leoš Janáček Foundation, the
B. Martinů Foundation and other more universal
funds. Business subjects support projects above
all through paid advertising, and less often in
the form of donations - legal entities can deduct
gifts to the value of 2% from the tax base and
physical persons can deduct gifts to the value of
10% from the tax base.
Copyright fees payable to the organisations
protecting authorial, performance and recording
rights (in the CR these are OSA, Dilia, Intergram) are the responsibility of the organiser of
an event, like publishing rights and hire fees for
orchestra materials. In this context an organiser
may make a special bilateral agreement on a discount as a regular major client.
Financial and Legal Conditions of
Agency Activity for Import
The Character of the Public
For any import into the Czech market it is necessary to consider the question of whether a musician is to appear in an established institution or
at a festival that will itself provide agency services and organisation. In the case of a projected
tour including PR and advertising, it is necessary
to engage a private agency with experience
in the area concerned (ArsKoncert, Arco Diva,
C.E.M.A-Central European Music Agency, Triart
Management, a majority of jazz agencies). If the
event in question is a commercially targeted
show, the Czech Republic has agencies directly
specialising in this type of entertainment (see
above). The usual percentage taken by agencies
is 15–20%. Negotiations including the wording of
contracts can be in English, and the second most
frequent foreign language employed is German.
The fees for all foreign musicians are taxed at
15%, and in the case of ensembles the entire fee
is taxable. Payments for services are taxed in accordance with Czech law at the place of performance just like payments to musicians. The VAT
charges will increase since 2012 to 14% at least,
and since 2013 they will be unified to 17,5%.
As compared to the situation abroad, authorial
royalties are relatively low, just like a legal fee
The public is relatively conservative. A well-known musician who appears with an unknown
repertoire is not taking too much of a risk, and an
unknown musician can be successful with a familiar repertoire. If an unknown musician appears
with an unusual repertoire, however, massive PR
in the media is essential.
A non-traditional repertoire can be presented
with success at clearly thematically profiled or
unconventional multimedia festivals (the Exposition of New Music, Archa festivals and suchlike)
and in some cases at established international
festivals provided that it is part of a well designed programme (e.g. Concentus Moraviae).
The Export of Czech Music
Since the Pragokoncert agency lost its monopoly there has been no “export policy” for Czech
music and for the moment the Czech Ministry
of Culture has no targeted policy to encourage
exports. In the field of classical music the country’s main advantage is the overall positive image
based largely on the established reputation
of the music of A. Dvořák and L. Janáček; the
broader Czech repertoire drawn from the works
of Smetana, Martinů, Suk and others, which is a
CZECH MUSIC GUIDE
I. Bittová
J. Bárta
priority with the Czech Philharmonic, for example, is proving harder to sell. On the other hand
the performance of national music by Czech
ensembles and the quality of chamber groups,
especially string quartets, is generally respected.
Some agencies (e.g. Arco Diva Management,
C.E.M.A. ArsKoncert, Triart Management, in
alternative AMP with the project of Czech Music
on the Road, since 2001) specialise in promoting
outstanding Czech musicians of the younger generation. German, Spain, and as far as the overseas market is concerned Japan, are considered
good export environments. South-east Asia and
China are also promising markets.
Czech music labels and distributors
The main traditional classical music recording
concerns Supraphon and Panton have been privatised. The Supraphon record company has became a part of the Bonton Group and publishing
house Editio Supraphon has been sold to Editio
Bärenreiter. Other parts of the enterprise started
to work independently as Bohemia Video Art,
Gramophone Company Loděnice, later Digital
media GZ etc.
Today’s Supraphon Music company (of Czech
ownership together with distribution company Bontonland) is orientated especially to
re-mastering and reissuing the best records of
the past in classical but also Czech pop music
(e.g. K. Ančerl, V. Talich, in pop e.g. M. Rottrová,
comeback of V. Špinarová, Olympic) and to
supporting top young artists in Czech classical
music (the singers Eva Urbanová and Dagmar
Pecková, baritone Roman Janál, violinists Pavel
Šporcl and Gabriela Demeterová, Iva Bittová, the
cellist Jiří Bárta, the pianist Igor Ardašev and
Jitka Čechová, clarinettist Ludmila Peterková,
ensembles the Panocha Quartet, Schola Gregoriana Pragensis, Musica Florea a.o.). It has also
continued to produce conductor’s sets (e.g. with
49
Jiří Bělohlávek). In the area of classical music it
has received many prestigious prizes (Grammy,
Gramophone, MIDEM).
The publishing house Panton has continued only
as Panton International Prague (since 1998). It
has been taken over by the German sheet music
publisher Schott and has additionally become
the exclusive seller of Schott in the Czech and
Slovak Republic and the exclusive agent for
Schott’s and Universal Edition Wien rental
service for the Czech Lands. Its CD label was
bought by Bonton and later discontinued.
The Czech Music Fund has continued its rental
service of sheet Czech contemporary music. The
public Czech Radio has established its publishing
and recording house Radioservis/Radio-Service
covering all genres of music.
In the pop market, the most important labels are:
the “majors” Sony BMG Music Entertainment, EMI
CR, Universal Music, Warner Music CR (it passed
its catalogue to Supraphon in 2010, from the
Czech label Supraphon). Other bigger publishers
of popular music are especially: Česká muzika,
Popron, Multisonic, Radioservis, Tommü Records,
in special genres: Arco Diva, Studio Matouš, Lotos
and MIC in classical Czech music, Indies Scope
Records, X Production, Guerilla Records, Polí5 for
alternative, Black Point Music, P&J Music, Cube
Metier, Animal Music, Arta and Amplion for jazz,
Music Vars and Edit for folklore.
Panther, Bontonland, Musica Bona, Vltava, Široký
Dvůr (since 1992, cooperating with around 80
foreign labels) and Classical Music Distribution (exclusive distributor of around 30 labels
including, Naxos, Opus Arte, Orfeo, Hyperion and
ca 90 other labels) Arco Diva (exclusively for the
Orchard) and P&J are among the most productive distributors including Czech music in the CR.
The German label Bärenreiter has entered the
Czech market as Bärenreiter Edition and become
the biggest publishing house and and rental service for sheet music in the Czech Republic.
Concerning the publishing houses, the foreign
ones are Editio Baerenreiter and Schott, the
independent ones are A-Tempo Verlag, Best I.A.,
Editio Janáček.
iTunes and the MusicJet catalogue with
1,500,000 recordings have been on Czech market since 2011.
50
MUSIC INSTITUTIONS
PRODUCTION OF MUSIC
INSTRUMENTS IN THE CR
Since 2006 Czech producers of music instruments and accessories cooperated in the cluster
Music CzechMade (actually inactive). The cluster
included the traditional producer of wind instruments AMATI Denak Ltd., the producer of pianos
and digital pianos Bohemia Bohemia Piano
Ltd, actually as C Bechstein Europe, Ltd., the
producer of classical Czech label pianos Petrof
Ltd., and also the following: the Association of
Music Instruments Producers in CR, the Czech
Piano Producers Association, the producer of
audio, video a sound cards DISK Multimedia Ltd.,
producer of guitar’s attachments George Dennis
Ltd., the producer of historical string instruments
Jaromír Jelínek, the wood processor Lignamon
CZ Ltd., the producer of virtuoso string instruments Marie Plötzlová, the producers and restorers of organs Organa Ltd., Saxophon Service
(Kraslice), the producer of string instruments
Strunal.CZ s.c., the producer of virtuoso string
instruments Štěpán Dvořák, accordion producer
and service Delicia (in Hořovice), editor of Czech
music journals and Portal Muzikus and the music
journal Hudební rozhledy.
The Czech Lands have a long tradition of violinmakers. The Circle of Czech Violin-Makers and
Fraternity of Prague Violin-Makers bring together
some of the Czech producers of hand-made
violins. The firm Jan Bečička & Stanislav Hüttl
& Petr Šefl in Hradec Králové constructs and
reconstructs harpsichords. The firm Harfa/Harp
repairs and sells harps, the firms Elo Lesák in
Krnov, Hlaváček in Pardubice, Kadet, Kobrle,
Lebeda, Macho, Marcus, Mázl, Pavlů, Procházka in
Prague are guitar-makers, Sagitarius Ltd. makes
and repairs guitars in Stráž nad Nisou. The firms
Tichý and Zákopčanik make cellos, double basses
and historical viols.
THE MUSIC EDUCATION SYSTEM / CZECH MUSIC GUIDE
THE MUSIC
EDUCATION
SYSTEM
Music education makes a part of the basic and
high school curriculum with one hour of teaching
weekly. Since 1987, some schools have extended
this requirement, but the principal role in music
education is played by the system of public Basic
Art Schools (former Public Art Schools – evening
and weekend schools). In 20010/11, this system
involved 485 Basic Art Schools with 821 branches. 234 565 pupils between the ages of 6 and
19 (from it 163 426 girls) are currently studying
some of kind of art (often many specialisations).
Basic Art Schools provide four specialisations:
music, dance, literature/dramatic and plastic
art. To this day, music education has retained an
individual character and a methodological preference for training in the professional performing
arts. 151 120 pupils are studying music (individual
training of instrument). The prices of courses are
very friendly (about 2 000 Kc per year i.e. ca 70
EUR). Ca 40 Basic Art Schools are private. They
can receive 100% public support (by region or
city).
In the Czech Republic there is also a relatively
dense network of 17 Conservatories that have the
status of high schools offering the national school-leaving examination leading to higher education.
13 of them have music departments (in Prague,
České Budějovice, Pilsen, Teplice, Pardubice, Kroměříž, Brno and Ostrava). The J. Ježek Conservatory in Prague is orientated to jazz music, and one
conservatory is for blind students (the Conservatory and Tuning School of J. Deyl in Prague). The
entire system currently educates approximately
3 400 students.
Academic education in music is provided by
Academies of Arts in Prague and Brno and at the
faculties of 12 universities in CR (in Prague, Brno,
Ostrava, Pilsen, Hradec Králové, České Budějovice,
Olomouc, Ústí nad Labem and Karlovy Vary). The
academies traditionally provide training in performance and composition, while universities are
orientated to teacher training and musicology.
Non-professional activities are monitored and sometimes coached by the National Information and
Advisory Centre for Culture (NIPOS-ARTAMA),
an institution that comes under the Ministry of
51
Culture. According to statistics produced by
this centre there exist about 200 amateur adult
choirs in the CR, concentrated in Moravia. These
choirs are presented especially at festivals in
Jihlava, Nymburk, Mikulov and Pardubice. Some
festivals go on tour. The category of children’s
choir covers a wide spectrum from school choirs
to long-standing elite choirs. The annual National
Festival of Children School Choirs held in different towns is preceded by regional selective
competitions. About 500 choirs involve more
than 20 000 children between 6-15 (18) years.
A similar number of children work in folklore
ensembles. These are presented in the festivals in
Nový Jičín, Olomouc, Pardubice and Brno.
Wind ensembles are a major phenomenon. They
consist of small wind orchestras (165), middlesized wind orchestra (25) and large wind youth
orchestras (45) and large wind orchestras for
adults (29) with around 7 000 players. Most
of them are based in Moravia. The prestigious
events in this area are held in Ostrava, Hodonín,
Kolín and Štětí. The Union of Wind Orchestras
of the CR acts as the national umbrella organisation.
52
ARCHIVES, LIBRARIES, SCIENCE AND RESEARCH CENTRES
ARCHIVES,
LIBRARIES, SCIENCE
AND RESEARCH
CENTRES
The Szamotuly Hymnbook, 1561
In the CR there are a great many historical music
archives situated in castles, churches, monasteries, museums and traditional institutions, with
more modern archives at the Czech Radio and in
academic institutes. The archives of the National
Museum, Charles University and the National
Library in Prague, the archives in the Vyšší Brod
Cloister, Moravian Land Museum in Brno, Kroměříž
Castle and Archbishopric, the Olomouc Archbishopric, the Náprstek Museum in Prague (ethno),
the Janáček Monument in Brno, the Terezín Monument, the Prague Conservatory, Czech Radio, the
Czech Music Fund, the Music Information Centre
and the Arts and Theatre Institute are among the
most important.
There are also significant muusic departments in
the National Library, the City Library in Prague, the
libraries of music deparments at Conservatories,
Academies and Universities and more specialised
library at the Theatre Institute in Prague and Moravian Land Library in Brno, and music departments
in research libraries in České Budějovice, Kladno,
Liberec, Olomouc, Pilsen, Olomouc and Ústí nad
Labem There are 383 public (s.c. city) libraries and
some have their own special music departments.
The lending fees are low and affordable to most of
the Czech public.
There are Musicological centres under the Academy of Sciences of CR (Ethnological Department), and at the Universities in Prague, Brno and
Olomouc. Training for future music teachers is
provided by Faculties of Education at the Universities in Prague, Brno, Ostrava, Olomouc, České
Budějovice, Karlovy Vary, Ústí nad Labem and
Hradec Králové. Some more specialist institutes
have been founded at the universities, for example
the Academy of Early Music at Masaryk University, the Department of Musical Lexicography and
Institute of European Ethnology at the Masaryk
University, and the Methodological Centres of
the Music Academy of Arts in Prague and Brno.
The Academies of Arts in Prague and Brno also
have departments teaching music theory and
music education, as well as their own research
programmes (e.g. in the area of sound). The music
departments of the National Museum (Smetana
Museum, Dvořák Museum and Department of
Historical Instruments) are also important centres
of historical scholarship.
Since1989 some special research workplaces have
been founded or extended: e.g. the Bohuslav
Martinů Institute in Prague, the Collegium Marianum – Týn School in Prague oriented to Baroque
music research, the Leoš Janáček Centrer in Brno,
the Arts and Theatre Institute in Prague with music
section, the National Institute of Special Education
in Prague and the Pop Museum in Prague.
JOURNALS AND INFORMATION CENTRES / CZECH MUSIC GUIDE
53
JOURNALS
AND INFORMATION
CENTRES
A. Dvořák: The Noon Witch score, 1st edition in print 1896
Czech Music Quarterly published by the Music
Information Centre, the B. Martinů Newsletter published by the B. Martinů Institute, the
Rudolfinum Revue published by Czech Philharmonic Orchestra (finished), the National Theatre
Journal published by the National Theatre and
Theatre published by the Theatre Institute are all
issued in English versions. Other specialist music
journals come out only in Czech: i.e. Harmonie/
Harmony and Hudební rozhledy/ Music Review
– journals about Czech music life, His Voice –
journal about alternative music produced by MIC,
two musicologist journals – Hudební věda/Musicology published by the Academy of Sciences
and Brno Opus Musicum, as well as the journal of
Choir Association Cantus, the journal of Folklore
Association Folklor/Folklore, and journal of Jeunesses Musicales Tam Tam.
Popular music magazines include Folk and Country, Jazz Dnes/Jazz Today, Rock and Pop, UNI
edited by UNIJazz and many internet journal for
specially interested people.
The Music Information Centre (Besední 3-5,
Prague 1) and Music Department of the Arts and
Theatre Institute (Celetná 17, Prague 1) with their
web sites (MIC – www.musica.cz,AI-TI – www.
czechmusic.org, www.institutumeni.cz) represent
the most important general music information
centre in the CR.
The following are important special information
centres: Institute Martinů (www.martinu.cz) in
Prague, Janáček Centre in Brno (www.janaceknadace.cz), Smetana Museum (www.nm.cz),
Dvořák Museum (www.nm.cz), Czech Music Museum (www.nm.cz/ceske-museum-hudby), Pop
Museum (www.popmuseum.cz).
54
REGIONAL PANORAMA OF CZECH MUSIC CULTURE
REGIONAL
PANORAMA
OF CZECH MUSIC
CULTURE
(EXPERT SELECTION OF DATA)
Key:
P
CL
F
O
E
IMF
IOF
IFF
IC
NF
PERSONALITIES, BORN, DIED OR FOR
A LONG TIME LIVING IN THE REGION
CULTURE LOCALITIES OF THE REGION
FESTIVALS
ORGANISATIONS
ENSEMBLES
INTERNATIONAL MUSIC FESTIVAL
INTERNATIONAL OPERA FESTIVAL
INTERNATIONAL FOLKLORE FESTIVAL
INTERNATIONAL COMPETITION
NATIONAL FESTIVAL
Note:
All regions and cities have their turist information centres
Regions:
List of TIC at the web:
www.seznam.cz/Cestovni-sluzby-a-pohostinstvi/Sluzby-turistum/Turisticka-informacni-centra (only in Czech).
CITY OF PRAGUE REGION
www.praha.eu
CENTRAL-BOHEMIAN REGION
www.kr-stredocesky.cz
HRADEC KRÁLOVÉ REGION
www.kr-kralovehradecky.cz
KARLOVY VARY REGION
www.kr-karlovarsky.cz
LIBEREC REGION
www.liberecky-kraj.cz
MORAVIAN-SILESIAN REGION
www.kr-moravskoslezsky.cz
OLOMOUC REGION
www.kr-olomoucky.cz
PARDUBICE REGION
www.ipardubice.cz
PILSEN REGION
www.kr-plzensky.cz
SOUTH-BOHEMIAN REGION
www.kraj-jihocesky.cz
SOUTH-MORAVIAN REGION
www.kr-jihomoravsky.cz
ÚSTÍ NAD LABEM REGION
www.kr-ustecky.cz
VYSOČINA REGION
www.kr-vysocina.cz
ZLÍN REGION
www.kr-zlinsky.cz
CZECH MUSIC GUIDE
55
F: THE WHOLE OF CR:
January-December, Jazz to the Regions, www.jazzdoregionu.cz
February-April, Garden, National Competition of Folk Music, http://www.casopisfolk.cz/zahrada.htm
Marz-June, Porta, IMF of country&western and folk music, www.porta-festival.cz
April-December, Czech Culture Festivities, festival of classical music, www.ceske-kulturni-slavnosti.cz
CENTRAL-BOHEMIAN REGION (CBR)
P: Bohuslav Matěj Černohorský (1684 Nymburk, CBR-1742 Graz) Baroque composer and organist, Jan
Dismas Zelenka (1679 Louňovice,CBR–1735 Dresden) Baroque composer and organist, Jiří A. Benda (1722
Benátky nad Jizerou, CBR-1795 Bad Koestritz) pre-classicist composer, František Benda (1709 Benátky
nad Jizerou -1786 Postupim by Berlin) pre-classicist composer, Jakub Jan Ryba (1765 Přeštice PR–1815 Voltuše by Rožmitál pod Třemšínem) composer, Tereza Stolzová (1834 Kostelec nad Labem, CBR-1902 Milán)
soprano, friend of Verdi, Josef Suk (1874 Křečovice u Neveklova -1935 Benešov, CBR) composer, violinist,
pedagogue, member of Czech Quartet, František Kmoch (1848 Zásmuky by Kolín, CBR-912 Kolín, CBR),
Rafael Kubelík (1914 Býchory u Kolína, CBR-1996 Kastanienbaum by Luzern, Swiss) conductor, composer
and pianist, Emil Burian (1876 Rakovník, CBR-1926 Prague) lyric baritone, Karel Burian (1870 Rousínov
by Rakovník-1924 Senomaty, CBR) tenor, Václav Talich (1883 Kroměříž, ZR-1961 Beroun, CBR) conductor,
Jarmila Novotná (1907 Prague-1994 New York, living and buried in Liteň by Beroun, CBR) soprano, Marie
Podvalová (1909 Čakovice by Prague, CBR-1992 Prague) soprano, Eva Randová (*1936 Kolín, CBR) mezzosoprano, Marta Jiráčková (*1932 Kladno, CBR), composer, Eva Urbanová (*1961 Slaný, CBR) soprano.
CL: Kladno (centre of the region), Stará Boleslav, Český Brod, Dobříš, Kamenice, Křivoklát, Kutná Hora,
Mělník, Mnichovo Hradiště, Nelahozeves, Poděbrady, Rakovník, Sedlčany, Slaný.
F: May-September, Festival of Non-Professional Chamber and Symphonic Ensembles, www.nipos-mk.cz
June, IMF Kutná Hora, festival of classical music, www.mfkh.cz
June, Porta – Czech National Finals, folk festival, Řevnice, www.porta-festival.cz
June, Opera Week, Kutná Hora, www.opernityden.cz
September, Dvořák Nelahozeves, www.czechmusic.org
September, Folklore Festival Polabí Posy Festival, www.folklornisdruzeni.cz/ff-polabska-vonicka
October, Rockfest Dobříš, www.rockfest.dobris.net
October, Sázavafest, folk festival, Benešov, www.sazavafest.cz
November, Jazz Days Slaný, www.jazzclubslany.cz
0: Ameba Production, agency org. Rock for People festivals, www.rockforpeople.cz; A. Dvořák Monument
Nelahozeves, http://www.nm.cz/Hlavni-strana/Navstivte-nas/Pamatnik-Antonina-Dvoraka-Nelahozeves.html;
A. Dvořák Monument Vysoká by Příbram, www.antonindvorak.cz; A. Dvořák Monument Zlonice,
www.padzlonice.ic.cz; Czech Art, agency for music production, Praha, www.czechart.cz; J. Suk Monument
Křečovice. www.nm.cz; Jazz Club Slaný, www.jazzclubslany.cz; Lotos, organiser of the Festival in Kutná
Hora, www.lotoscd.cz.
HRADEC KRÁLOVÉ REGION (HKR)
P: Eduard Nápravník (1839 Býšť by Hradec Králové-1916 Petrohrad, Russia), composer and conductor,
Karel Nedbal (1888 Dvůr Králové, HKR-1934 Prague) conductor, Viktor Kalabis (1923 Červený Kostelec,
HKR-2006 Prague), composer, Ivana Loudová (*1941 Chlumec nad Cidlinou, HKR) composer.
CL: Hradec Králové (centre of the region, traditional locality of music instrument makers), Albrechtice,
Jaroměř, Jičín, Náchod, Nová Paka.
F: June, Czech Choir Festival Hradec Králové, www.sboroveslavnosti.cz
June, Pardubice–Hradec Králové Folklore Festival, www.folklornifestival
June, Cultural ReggaeVibez, multi-cultural festival; Hořice in Podkrkonoší, www.culturalreggaevibez.cz
56
REGIONAL PANORAMA OF CZECH MUSIC CULTURE
July, Hip Hop Kemp, a biggest festival of hip hop in CR, Hradec Králové, www.hiphopkemp.cz
July, Rock for People, www.rockforpeople.cz
August, IFF Červený Kostelec, [email protected]
August, Open Air Music Festival Trutnov, multigenre festival, www.festivaltrutnov.cz
October, IMF Jazz Goes to Town, Hradec Králové, www.jazzgoestotown.cz
November, Music Forum Hradec Králové, www.hfhk.cz
O: Adalbertinum, Hradec Culture Society, www.adalbertinum.cz; Association of the Musical Instruments
Makers of the Czech Republic, Hradec Králové, www.hnn.cz/avhn.htm; Czech Pianomakers’Association,
Hradec Králové, www.hnn.cz/cks.htm; Drak Theatre, Hradec Králové, www.draktheatre.cz; Hradec Králové
Philharmonic Orchestra, www.fhk.cz; Department of Music of the Faculty of Education, University of Hradec Králové, www.uhk.cz; Klicpera Theatre, Hradec Králové, www.klicperovodivadlo.cz; Petrof, seat of the
cluster Czech Instruments, Hradec Králové, www.petrof-pianosalon.cz; P. J. Vejvanovský Society, Hradec
Králové, Phone: +420 495063104, +420 286881805
E. Boni Pueri, boys choir by Basic Music School Hradec Králové, www.bonipueri.cz; Hradec Králové Philharmonic Orchestra, www.fhk.cz
CITY OF PRAGUE
Prague as an administrative and culture centre has been a crossroad of many famous artists, seat of many
organisations and activities. Many of personalities visited or worked in Prague during history: L. v. Beethoven, N. Paganini, F. Liszt, P. I. Čajkovskij, R. Wagner, G. Mahler and others.
P: Guillaume de Machaut (1300–77) French composer living and working at the court of Charles IV in
Prague, Kryštof Harant from Polžice and Bezdružice (1564 Klenová–1621 Prague), Renaissance composer, noble, Bohuslav Matěj Černohorský (1684 Nymburk, CBR-1742 Graz, Austria) Baroque composer and
organist, living and working in Prague, Jan Dismas Zelenka (1679 Louňovice, CBR–1735 Dresden) Baroque
composer and organist living in Prague for a long time, František X. Brixi (1732–71 Prague), Baroque composer and organist, František X. Dušek (1731 Chotěborky by Jaroměř–1799 Prague), pre-classicist composer and pianist, Václav Jan Tomášek (1774 Skuteč–1850 Prague), composer and pianist, Bedřich Smetana
(1824 Litomyšl -1884 Prague), composer, pianist, founder of the National music, Vilém Blodek (1834–74
Prague), composer, Josef Bohuslav Foerster (1859–1951 Prague), composer and writer, Berta FoersterováLautererová (1869-1936 Prague), wife of J. B. Foester, soprano, Karel Kovařovic (1862–1920 Prague),
conductor and composer, Otakar Ostrčil (1879–1932 Prague), composer and conductor, Karel Nedbal
(1888 Dvůr Králové–1964 Prague), conductor, K. B. Jirák (1891 Prague–1972 Chicago), composer, Alois
Hába (1893 Vizovice SMR–1973 Prague), composer, Ladislav Vycpálek (1882–Vrbovice by Prague–1969
Prague), Jaroslav Křička (1882 Kelč na Moravě–1969 Prague), composer, Pavel Bořkovec (1894–1972 Prague), Ervín Schulhoff (1894 Prague–1942 Würzburg), composer and pianist of German origin, composer,
Zdeněk Chalabala (1899 Uherské Hradiště–1962 Prague), conductor, Marie Budíková (1904–84 Prague),
soprano, Emil František Burian (1904 Pilsen–1959 Prague), composer and avant-garde theatre artist, Iša
Krejčí (1904–68 Prague), composer, Václav Smetáček (1906–86 Prague), conductor, Václav Trojan (1907
Pilsen-1983 Prague), composer especially of film music, Jiří Srnka (1907 Písek–1982 Prague), composer
of film music, Miloslav Kabeláč (1908–79 Prague), avant-garde composer, Karel Reiner (1910 Žatec–1979
Prague), composer and pianist, Klement Slavický (1910 Tovačov na Moravě–1999 Prague), composer, Jan
Kapr (1914–88 Prague), Josef Páleníček (1914 Travnik–1991 Prague), pianist, Marie Tauberová (1916 Vysoké
Míto–2003 Prague), soprano, Jan Hanuš (1915–2004 Prague), composer, Miroslav Venhoda (1915 Moravské Budějovice–1987 Prague), choirmaster, founder of the ensemble Prague Madrigalists and authentic
interpretation of Early music, Jan Rychlík (1916–65 Prague), composer, Karel Berman (1919 Jindřichův
Hradec–1995 Prague), basso, Václav Neumann (1920 Prague–1995 Vienna), conductor, Zbyněk Vostřák
(1920 Prague–1985 Strakonice), avant-garde composer, Ivo Jirásek (1920–2004 Prague), Vladimír Sommer
(1921 Dolní Jiřetín by Most–1997 Prague), composer, Zdeněk Liška (1922 Smečno–1982 Prague), composer
especially of film music, Jiří Šlitr (1924 Lhota by Rychnov–1969 Prague), songster of SEMAFOR Theatre,
Zdeněk Košler (1928–95 Prague), conductor, Zdeněk Lukáš (1928–2007 Prague), composer successful
especially in choir music, Martin Turnovský (*1928 Prague), conductor, Petr Eben (*1929 Žamberk–2007
Prague), Václav Kučera (*1929 Prague), composer, Milan Malý (1930–2004 Prague), choirmaster, Marek
CZECH MUSIC GUIDE
57
Kopelent (1932 Prague), composer, Karel Velebný (*1931 Prague), jazzman, Věra Soukupová (*1932
Prague), mezzo-soprano, Rudolf Dašek (*1933 Prague), jazzman, guitarist, Jan Klusák (*1934 Prague),
composer, Eva Olmerová (1932–93 Prague), jazz singer, Luboš Fišer (1935–99 Prague), composer also of
film music, Karel Svoboda (*1938 Prague), composer of pop music and musicals and film music, Lukáš
Matoušek (*1943 Prague), composer, leader of Early music ensemble Ars cameralis, Petr Janda (*1942
Prague), pop-rock singer, leader of group Olympic, Štěpán Rak (*1945 Prague), guitarist and composer,
Jiří Bělohlávek (*1946 Prague) conductor, Ivan Kurz (*1947 Prague), composer, Milan Slavický (1947–2009
Prague), composer, Petr Kofroň (*1955 Prague), composer, leader of the ensemble Agon, Martin Smolka,
(*1959 Prague), composer, Miroslav Pudlák (*1961 Prague), composer, Kryštof Mařatka (*1972 Prague)
composer, Miroslav Srnka (*1975 Prague), composer, Ondřej Adámek (*1979 Prague), composer.
F: January, IF of Wind Orchestras, www.orfea.cz
January-December, Jazz Meets World, Prague, www.jmw.cz
February-June, RespectFestival, world music festival, www.respectmusic.cz/respect-festival
May-November, AghaRTA Prague Jazz Festival, www.agharta.cz
May-June, IMF Prague Spring with the IC, www.festival.cz
June, Porta, festival of folk, tramp music, in Řevnice and Ústí n. Labem, www.porta-festival.cz
June-July, IMF Prague PROMS, www.cnso.cz
July, Bohemia Jazz Fest, www.bohemiajazzfestival.cz
July, IMF Early Music Festivities, www.collegiummarianum.cz
July-August, IMF Ameropa, Prague, Brandýs nad Labem, Český Krumlov, www.ameropa.org
August, Ad honorem Mozart – Praga, http://festival.musictheatre.cz
August, IMF Horn Prague, www.praguehorn.cz
August-September, IFF Prague Fair, www.folklornisdruzeni.cz/prazsky-jarmark
September, St. James Audite Organum, www.auditeorganum.cz
September, Vejvoda Zbraslav, IF of brass band, www.orfea.cz
September-November, Jiří Hošek’s Unconventional Žižkov Autumn, www.zizkov.cz/festival
April-October, Stimul Festival, festival of alternative music, www.stimul-festival.cz
September-November, IMF Strings of Autumn, www.strunypodzimu.cz
September-October, Prague Strings, IF of guitar and mandoline orchestras, www.accordion.cz
October, Prague Accordion Days, www.accordion.cz
October, IMF Dvořák Prague Festival, www.dvorakovapraha.cz
October-November, IMF of Concert Melodrama, www.concert-melodrama.com
October-November, Tones under the Cities, www.tonynadmesty.com
October-November, International Jazz Festival Prague, www.jazzfestivalPrague.cz
October-November, IMF Radio Autumn, www.radioautumn.cz
October-December, Musica Nova, IC in EA music, http://musicanova.ceah.cz
November, Days of Contemporary Music, www.ahuv.cz
November, IMF Alternativa, www.unijazz.cz
November, Contempuls, festival of contemporary music, www.contempuls.cz
November, Encounter of Folklore orchestras, www.folklornisdruzeni.cz/ff-setkani-lidovych-muzik
December, IF of Advent and Christmas Music, www.orfea.cz
December, IMF Bohuslav Martinů Days, www.martinu.cz
December-January, IMF Czech Touches of Music, www.ceskedotekyhudby.cz
O: AGENCIES
10:15, agency organised pop concerts of foreign stars, www.1015.cz; Ada Slivanská Art-Agency, classical
music agency, www.art-agency.cz; Agada Agency, classical music agency, www.agada.cz; Agency Fait,
classical music agency (Mozart), www.musica.cz/fait; Agency J+D, classical music agency,
www.agenturajd.net; Agency Kate, agency of Dvořák Symphony Orchestra and Orchestra Puellarum
Pragensis, [email protected]; Agency Subiton, classical music agency (J. Svěcený-vn.), www.sveceny.cz;
Agharta, 2HP-Production, jazz music agency, www.agharta.cz; AMP, jazz-rock agency, www.rock-jazz.cz;
Arco Diva Management, classical music agency, www.arcodiva.cz; Aurapont, agency for art fiths protection, www.aura-pont.cz; Auviex, agency produced IMF Český Krumlov, www.auviex.cz; BVA Intl., producer of video and film, broadcasting service, distributor, www.bva.cz; Clavis, agency of Prague Chamber
Singers, www.clavisagency.com; Czech Koncert Agency, agency for classical music, www.czechkoncert.com;
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REGIONAL PANORAMA OF CZECH MUSIC CULTURE
Em-Art, classical music agency, www.ensemblemartinu.com; EuroArt Prague, classical chamber music
agency, www.euroart.cz; Fisyo Agency of FISYO orchestra, www.fisyo.cz; Charm Music, import international agency for pop music, www.charmmusic.cz; IMF Prague Spring, agency of IMF Prague Spring,
www.festival.cz; Impresario Agency, agency for classical music, www.impresario.cz; Live Nation CR, import international agency for pop music, www.livenation.cz; Makroconcert, import international agency for
pop music, www.makroconcert.cz; Or-fea, agency for popular music, especially brass band music, www.
orfea.cz; P&J Music, jazz and alternative music agency, www.jmw.cz; P&P Art Production, agency for all
kind of music, www.kultura-hudba.cz; Prague Chamber Orchestra Agency, www.pko.cz, Praga Sinfonietta,
classical music agency, www.pragasinfonietta.eu; Pragokoncert Bohemia, www.pragokoncert.com; Prague
Symphony Orchestra FOK Agency, www.fok.cz; Rachot Production, agency of Akropolis Palace for all
genres of music, especially alternative music, www.respectmusic.cz; Reduta Jazz Club,
www.redutajazzclub.cz; Roxy, agency of Roxy club for all genres of music, especially alternative music,
www.roxy.cz; Audite Organum, www.auditeorganum.cz; Suk Chamber Orchestra Agency,
www.suk-ch-o.cz; The Prague Concert, agency, produced turné in Europe, www.concert.cz; WTF Entertainment, import international pop music agency, http://www.wtfentertainment.com/newspress/.
COMPETITIONS
IC Concertino Praga, for young artists to 16 years, www.rozhlas.cz/concertino; IC of Prague Spring,
www.festival.cz; IC of Melodrama, www.concert-melodrama.cz; IC Musica nova, in electro-acoustic music,
www.musicanova.seah.cz.
EXPERT WORKPLACES, SCHOOLS, ACADEMIES
Academy of Performing Arts, Music Faculty, www.hamu.cz, Academy of Performing Arts, Sound Creation
Studies at the Film Faculty, www.famu.cz; Association of Basic Music Schools, www.azus-cr.cz;
B. Martinů Institute, www.martinu.cz; Cabinet for Study of Czech Theatre, www.theatre.cz; Collegium
Marianum, Týn School, centrum for Early music, www.collegiummarianum.cz; Czech Music Council, nongovernmental organisation, Czech section of International Music Council by UNESCO, www.chr.nipax.
cz; Institute of Arts/Theatre Institute, Music Department, www.czechmusic.org; Institute of Ethnology,
Department of Music History, www.eu.cas.cz; Institute of Musicology, Philosophical Faculty of Charles
University, http://musicology.ff.cuni.cz; Jan Neruda High School, with extended music education,
www.gjn.cz; Jaroslav Ježek Conservatory, www.kjj.cz; Jan Deyl Conservatory, www.kjd.cz; Metodology
Centre of Academy of Performing Arts, Music Faculty, http://web.hamu.cz/mc/kurs_hped.htm; Music
Information Centre, www.musica.cz; National Institute of Special Education, www.nuov.cz;
Prague Conservatory, www.prgcons.cz.
FOUNDATIONS
B. Martinů Foundation, www.martinu.cz; Czech Music Foundation, www.nchf.cz; Foundation Life of Artist,
www.nadace-zivot-umelce.cz; Foundation OSA, www.osa.cz.
LIBRARIES
Municipal Library Prague, Music Department, www.mlp.cz; National Library Prague, Music Department,
www.nkp.cz.
MEDIA, JOURNALS (in English)
Classic FM, www.classicfm.cz; Czech Radio, public broadcasting, www.rozhlas.cz; Czech TV,
public broadcasting, www.ceskatelevize.cz; Czech Music, www.musica.cz/czechmusic;
Martinů Newsletter, www.martinu.cz; Národní divadlo/National Theatre, www.narodni-divadlo.cz;
Theatre, www.theatre.cz.
CZECH MUSIC GUIDE
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MUSEUMS
National Museum/Czech Music Museum, www.nm.cz; Pop Museum, www.popmuseum.cz.
THEATRES
Music Theatre Karlín, operetta and musical theatre, www.hdk.cz; National Theatre,
www.narodni-divadlo.cz; State Opera Prague, www.opera.cz; Theatre Archa, specialized in alternative
music theatre, www.archatheatre.cz; Theatre Brodway, specialized in musicals, www.divadlo-brodway.cz;
Theatre Hybernia, specialized in musicals and star´s concerts, www.hybernia.eu.
HALLS
Atrium Žižkov, www.atriumzizkov.cz; Dvořák Hall, Rudolfinum, www.ceskafilharmonie.cz; Lucerna Music
Bar, www.musicbar.cz; Martinů Hall, in Academy of Arts, www.hamu.cz; Palace Akropolis, specialized for
alternative music; www.palacakropolis.cz; Palace Lucerna, www.lucpra.com; O2 Arena, www.o2arena.cz;
Prague Conservatory Hall, www.prgcons.cz; Smetana Hall, Municipal House, www.obecnidum.cz; Church
of Ss. Simeon and Juda, www.fok.cz; Suk Hall, Municipal House, www.obecnidum.cz.
E: Bach-Collegium Prague, www.bachcollegium.cz; Orchestra Berg, www.berg.cz; Czech Film Orchestra,
www.czechfilmorchestra.com; Czech Virtuosi, www.czechvirtuosi.cz; Czech Chamber Orchestra,
www.cko.cz; Czech National Symphony Orchestra, www.cnso.cz; Czech Philharmonic Orchestra,
www.ceskafilharmonie.cz; Czech Radio Orchestra, www.rozhlas.cz/socr; Czech Student Orchestra,
www.studentskyorchestr.cz/cesky-studentsky-orchestr; Film Symphony Orchestra, www.fisyo.cz; Musici di
Praga, http://musicidp.sweb.cz/indexcz.htm; Orchestra Puellarum Pragensis, www.puellarumpragensis.com;
Praga Sinfonietta, www.pragasinfonietta.eu; Prague Conservatory Symphony Orchestra, www.prgcons.cz;
Prague Chamber Orchestra, www.pko.cz; Prague Metropolitan Symphony Orchestra, www.clavisagency.
com; Prague Philharmonia, www.pkf.cz; Prague Student Orchestra, www.studentskyorchestr.cz/prazskystudentsky-orchestr; Prague Symphony Orchestra, www.fok.cz; Suk Chamber Orchestra,
www.suk-ch-o.cz; Z. Fibich Philharmonic Orchestra, www.fzf.cz; Prague Chamber Choir,
www.praguechamberchoir.cz; Kühn Children Choir, www.kuhnata.cz; Prague Philharmonic Choir,
www.choir.cz. Chamber ensembles: www.muzikus/muzikontakt or www.czechmusic.org
OTHERS
Association of Musicians and Musicologists, www.ahuv.cz; Associations of Authors and Performers,
www.sai.cz; Association of Artistic Agencies, www.asuma.cz; Czech Music Council, www.chr.nipax.cz; Czech
Chamber Music Society, www.ceskafilharmonie.cz; Czech Sacred Music Society, www.sdh.cz;
Jeunesses Musicales in CR, www.hudebnimladez.cz; Ministry of Culture, www.mkcr.cz; Ministry of Foreign
Affair, www.mzv.cz; Ministry of Education and Sports, www.msmt.cz; Union of Czech Choirs, www.ucps.cz;
Union of Professional Musicians of the CR, [email protected]; Union of Orchestral Players of the
CR, www.unieorch.cz.
KARLOVY VARY REGION (KVR)
P: The region has been visited during all time by famous culture personalities (C. M. von Weber, Ignacio
Moscheles, Ludvik Spohr, Frederyk Chopin, Richard Wagner, Antonín Dvořák and others).
CL: Karlovy Vary (centre of the region, spa), Fratiškovy Lázně (spa), Cheb, Luby (traditional region of violin-makers), Kraslice (traditional region of wind-makers), Mariánské Lázně (spa), Sokolov
F: March, A. Dvořák International Singing Courses, www.mpcad.cz
August, F. Chopin Piano IC, Mariánské Lázně, www.chopinfestival.cz
September, Dvořák Autumn Festival Karlovy Vary, www.kso.cz
September, IFF Karlovy Vary, www.kffestival.cz
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REGIONAL PANORAMA OF CZECH MUSIC CULTURE
O: Municipal Theatre Karlovy Vary, www.karlovarske-divadlo.cz; Amati, Ltd., producer of wind instruments, Kraslice, www.amati.cz; F. Chopin House, Mariánské Lázně, www.chopinfestival.cz; Municipal Theatre Mariánské Lázně, www.marianskelazne.cz/cs/divadlo-marianske-lazne;
E: Karlovy Vary Choir, www.kvps.cz; Karlovy Vary Symphony Orchestra, www.kso.cz; Františovy Lázně
Orchestra, www.kurorchester.cz; West Bohemian Symphony Orchestra of Mariánské Lázně, www.zso.cz.
LIBEREC REGION (LR)
P: Jaroslav Řídký (1897 Liberec-1956 Poděbrady), composer.
CL: Liberec (centre of the region), Jablonec nad Nisou, Česká Lípa
F: June, Festival of Youth, Liberec, www.hudebnimladez.cz
June, IMF Reggae Ethnic Session, Česká Lípa, www.realbeat.net
August, International Choir Festival Bohemia Cantat, Liberec, www.bohemiacantat.cz
September-October, IMF Lípa Musica, Česká Lípa, www.lipamusica.cz
O: Agency R.E.C., Česká Lípa, www.realbeat.net; Music Agency Trifolium, Česká Lípa, www.lipamusica.cz;
F. X. Šalda Theatre, Liberec, www.saldovo-divadlo.cz; Naive Theatre Liberec, www.naivnidivadlo.cz;
Municipal Theatre Jablonec nad Nisou, www.divadlojablonec.cz.
E: Children Choir Severáček, Liberec, www.severacek.cz; Children Choir Jizerka, Semily,www.jizerka.semily.cz.
MORAVIAN-SILESIAN REGION (MSR)
P: Pavel Josef Vejvanovský (1640 Hukvaldy, MSR–1693 Kroměříž, ZR), Baroque Kapellmeister and trumpeter, Leoš Janáček (1854 Hukvaldy, MSR–1928 Ostrava, MSR), composer, one of founder of the national music, Rudolf Kubín (1909–73, Ostrava, MSR) composer, František Lýsek, (1904 Proskovice, MSR–1977 Brno)
choirmaster, pedagogue, folklorist, Ilja Hurník (*1922 Ostrava), composer and pianist, Otmar Mácha (*1922
Ostrava–2006 Prague) composer, Svatopluk Havelka (*1925 Vrbice, MSR–2009 Prague), composer.
CL: Ostrava (centre of the region), Frenštát, Frýdek-Místek, Hradec nad Moravicí, Hukvaldy, Nový Jičín,
Opava.
F: OSTRAVA
May-June, IMF Janáček May, Ostrava, www.janackuvmaj.cz
June, IMF Colours of Ostrava, world music festival, www.colours.cz
August-September, IF and Courses Ostrava Days Festival, www.newmusicostrava.cz/ostravske-dny-festival
August, IFF Folklore without Borders, Ostrava, www.folklorbezhranic.cz;
September-October, St. Wenceslas Music Festival, it is held in 24 cities of the region, www.shf.cz.
OTHER LOCALITIES OF THE REGION
June, IFF Frýdek Místek, www.ostravicka.cz
June, IC and IMF Beethoven Hradec, Castle Hradec nad Moravicí, www.sdruzenitalent.cz
August, IFF Silesian Days, Dolní Lomná, www.slezskedny.wz.cz
August, IFF Frenštát Festivities, www.folklornisdruzeni.cz/frenstatske-slavnosti; August/September, IMF
Janáček Hukvaldy, www.janackovyhukvaldy.cz
October, Petr Eben International Organ Competition, Opava, www.konzervator.cz/organ
O: OSTRAVA
Art Agency Presto, specialized in classical music, folklore, jazz, www.agenturapresto.cz; Centre of New
Music, www.newmusicostrava.cz; Colour Production, Ostrava, www.colours.cz; Culture Centre Poruba,
www.kcporuba.cz; Culture House, Ostrava, www.dkmoas.cz; Janáček Conservatory Ostrava, www.jko.cz;
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Janáček May, Ostrava, www.janackuvmaj.cz; Janáček Philharmonic Orchestra Ostrava,
www.jfo.cz; National Theatre Moravian-Silesian Ostrava, www.ndm.cz; Pedagogical Faculty Ostrava
University, www.osu.cz; Petarda Production, specialized in pop, rock, jazz, www.petarda.cz; Public Conservatory Ostrava, www.lko.cz; Ragtime Records, www.ragtime.cz; Stodolní street (around this street is
concentrated 58 music clubs), www.stodolni.cz.
OTHER LOCALITIES OF THE REGION
Silesian Matice, Folklore Areal, Dolní Lomná, www.maticeslezska.cz
Foundation Janáčkovy Hukvaldy, www.janackovyhukvaldy.cz
Choir Association of Woman Teachers Opava, www.pssu.tym.cz
Silesian Land Museum Opava, www.szmo.cz;
Silesian Theatre Opava, www.divadlo-opava.cz.
OSTRAVA
E: Big Ostrava Band, www.agenturapresto.cz; Children’s Folklore Ensemble Ostravička, www.ostravicka.
cz; Janáček Philharmonic Orchestra Ostrava, www.jfo.cz; Kubín Quartet, www.kubinkvartet.cz; Ostravská
banda, Ostrava, www.newmusicostrava.cz/en/ostravska-banda; Ostrava Children Choir,
http://ostravskydetskysbor.net; Ostrava Lady Teachers Choir, www.psou.ic.cz; Stadler Clarinet Quartet,
www.agenturapresto.cz; University Choir, [email protected]
OLOMOUC REGION (OL)
P: Václav Kaprál (1889 Určice by Prostějov, OR – 1947 Brno), composer and pianist, Klement Slavický (1910
Tovačov–1999 Prague), composer, Miloslav Ištvan (1928 Olomouc-1990 Brno), composer, Emil Viklický
(*1948 Olomouc), jazzman and composer, František Preisler (*1973, Olomouc), conductor and organist.
CL: Olomouc (centre of the region, folklore locality Haná, old religious centre), Javorník, Mohelnice, Přerov,
Šumperk, Uničov
F: March-April, International Choir Festival Musica Religiosa, Olomouc, www.festamusicale.com
May-June, IMF Dvořák’s Olomouc, www.mfo.cz
June, International Choir Festival of Songs, Olomouc, www.festamusicale.com
July, Zahrada /Garden/, multi-genre festival – traditionally specialized in folk music, Náměšť na Hané,
http://www.casopisfolk.cz/zahrada.htm
August-September, Mohelnice Stage, Tramp and Folk Music Festival, Mohelnice,
www.mohelnickydostavnik.cz
August, IFF Šumperk, www.festivalsumperk.cz
September, International Organ Festival, Olomouc, www.mfo.cz
September, Czechoslovak Jazz Festival Přerov, www.csjf.cz
September-November, IMF Karl Ditters from Dittersdorf, Javorník, Jeseník, Mikulovice, www.festivalditters.cz
November, IMF Blues Alive, Šumperk, www.bluesalive.cz
O: Culture House Šumperk, organiser of jazz festivals, www.dksumperk.cz; Jazz Tibet Club, Olomouc,
www.jazzclub.olomouc.com; Moravian Theatre Olomouc, www.moravskedivadlo.cz; Municipal Culture
Centre, Uničov, www.mkzunicov.cz; Theatre Šumperk, www.divadlosumperk.cz; University Olomouc,
Philosophical Faculty, Musicology, www.musicology.upol.cz; 15 Minutes Club, specialized in rock and pop,
Olomouc, http://15minut.net.
E: ZUŠ Iša Krejčí Big Band, orchestra of Basic Music School, www.bluetrain.cz, Folklore Ensemble Krajina,
www.fskrajina.asp2.cz; Folklore Ensemble Frgal, www.frgal.cz; Children Folklore Ensemble Dunaječek,
www.folklornisdruzeni.cz/dunajecek; Moravian Philharmonic Orchestra, Olomouc www.mfo.cz.
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REGIONAL PANORAMA OF CZECH MUSIC CULTURE
PARDUBICE REGION (PAR)
P: Jan Václav Tomášek (1774–Skuteč, PaR–1850 Prague), composer, pianist, pedagogue, Bedřich Smetana
(1824 Litomyšl, PaR – 1884 Prague), composer, founder of “national music”, Vítězslav Novák (1870 Kamenice nad Lipou, VR – 1949 Skuteč, PaR), composer, Bohuslav Martinů (*1890 Polička, PaR +1959 Lieestal,
Schweiz), composer, Petr Eben (*1929 Žamberk, PaR-2007 Prague), composer.
CL: Pardubice (centre of the region), Chrudim, Litomyšl, Polička, Ústí nad Orlicí
F: April, MF Pardubice Music Spring, Pardubice, www.kfpar.cz
April, Polička Jazz Festival, www.jazz.policka.org
May, Martinů Fest, Polička, www.tyluvdum.cz
June, FF Pardubice-Hradec Králové, www.folklornifestival.cz
June-July, International Opera Festival Smetana Litomyšl, www.smetanovalitomysl.cz
July, IF of Academical Choirs IFAS, www.ifas.cz
July, International Martinů Festival and Choir Competition, www.fbm.cz
July-August, Litomyšl International String Master Class, www.litomyslmasterclass.org
September, Young Smetana Litomyšl, festival of Czech Jeunesses Musicales,
www.hudebnimladez.cz/litomysl
O: Ameba Promotion, agency, organiser of many Rock festivals, www.rockforpeople.cz; B. Martinů Monument, Polička, www.cbmpolicka.cz; Conservatory Pardubice, www.konzervatorpardubice.eu; Culture
House Dubina, Pardubice, www.kcpardubice.cz; Culture Service of Polička City, www.tyluvdum.cz; International Opera Festival Smetanova Litomyšl, agency, www.smetanovalitomysl.cz; Rock club Ponorka /
Submarine/, Pardubice, www.ponorka-rc.cz Sbor.cz, Czech Choir Portal, managed in Pardubice,
www.sbor.cz; Smetana House, Litomyšl, www.litomysl.cz/sd.
E. Chamber Philharmonic Orchestra, Pardubice, www.kfpar.cz; Pardubice Children Choir Iuventus
Cantans, www.iuventuscantans.cz; University Choir Pardubice, http://vus.upce.cz; Litomyšl Symphony
Orchestra, non-professional chamber orchestra, [email protected]
PILSEN REGION (PIR)
P: Kryštof Harant of Polžice and Bezdružice (1564 Klenová , PiR–1621 Prague), Renaissance composer,
Jakub Jan Ryba (1765 Přeštice PiR–1815 Voltuše by Rožmitál pod Třemšínem), composer and teacher, Emil
František Burian (1904 Pilsen, PiR–1959 Prague), composer, conductor, avant-garde theatre artist, Otakar
Ševčík (1852 Horažďovice PiR–1932 Písek, SBR), violinist, teacher, Karel Gott (*1939 Pilsen), pop star,
Milada Šubrtová (*1924 Lhota by Klatovice, PiR-2011 Prague), soprano.
CL: Pilsen (centre of the region), Dolní Lukavice (castle), Domažlice (folklore region), Horšovský Týn
(castle), Chodsko folklore region, Klatovy, Kutná Hora, Loket (castle), Plasy (castle).
In the year 2015 – European Capital of Culture 2015
F: February-March, Smetana Days, www.smetanovskedny.cz
March, Smetana International Piano Competition, www.piano-competition.com
June, IFF Pilsen, www.mffplzen.eu
July, Rock in Pilsen, www.koncertyvplzni.cz
August, FF Chodsko Folk Festival – St. Lawrence Festival, Domažlice, www.chodskeslavnosti.cz
September, Haydn Festival Lukavice, www.haydn-festival.eu.
O: Conservatory Pilsen, www.konzervatorplzen.cz; Czech Radio Pilsen, www.rozhlas.cz/plzen;
Dominik Centre, agency for classical, pop and jazz, Pilsen, www.dominikcentrum.cz; Experimental Folk Studio, agency, Pilsen, www.bestbohemiaagency.cz; House of Blues, Pilsen, www.houseofblues.cz;
J. K. Tyl Theatre, Pilsen, www.djkt-plzen.cz; Jazz Rock Café, Pilsen, http://jazz.magicpoint.cz; Media Production Music, agency specialized in Rock, Pilsen, www.koncertyvplzni.cz; Music and Internet Library, Pilsen,
www.kmp.plzen-city.cz; Music School Yamaha, Pilsen branch, www.yamahaskola.cz, [email protected]
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E: Alternativa, group, Pilsen, www.alternativa.mysteria.cz; Big Brass Orchestra of Conservatory in Pilsen,
www.konzervatorplzen.cz; New Czech Song, amateur choir, Pilsen, www.novaceskapisen.cz; Pilsen Gospel
Choir, www.tog.cz; Pilsen Philharmonic Orchestra, www.plzenskafilharmonie.cz; Symphony Orchestra of
Pilsen Conservatory, www.konzervatorplzen.cz.
SOUTH BOHEMIAN REGION (SBR)
Oskar Nedbal (1874 Tábor,SBR–1930 Zagreb), composer, conductor, violist, Otakar Ševčík (1852 Horažďovice–1934 Písek, SBR), violinist, pedagogue, Emil Hlobil (1901 Veselí nad Lužnicí–1981 Prague), Robert
Smetana (1904 Vienna–88 Brno), musicologist composer, Jiří Srnka (1907 Písek, SBR–1982 Prague), film
music composer, Karel Ančerl (1908 Tučapy by Soběslav, SBR-1973 Toronto Canada), conductor, Jaroslav
Krček (*1939 Písek, SBR), composer and performer of folk and Early music, Sylvie Bodorová (*1954 České
Budějovice, SBR), composer, Pavel Šporcl (*1963 České Budějovice, SBR).
CL: České Budějovice (centre of the region), Český Krumlov (historical city and castle), Hluboká nad Vltavou (castle), Hořice, Jindřichův Hradec (castle), Strakonice (folklore region), Šumava region, Třeboň.
F: May, Jamboree Strakonice, bluegrass festival, Strakonice Castle, www.jamboree-cz.com
June-August, Music Summer at Hluboká, www.ajg.cz;
June, South-Bohemian Folklore Festival Kovářov, www.folklornisdruzeni.cz/jihocesky-folklorni-festival
June-August, South-Bohemian Jazz Fest, many places in SBR www.sbjf.cz
June, South-Bohemian Festival, in many places of the region, [email protected]
July, Třeboň Nocturnes, www.trebonskanocturna.cz
July, Festival of Early Music, www.earlymusic.cz
July-August, South Bohemia Chamber Festival, in many places of the region, www.jkfestival.cz
July-August, IMF Český Krumlov, www.auviex.cz
July, Open Air Music Fest, Přeštěnice, rock and other genres, www.prestenice.cz
August, IFF Písek, www.folklornisdruzeni.cz/folklorni-festival-cesky-krumlov
August- September, IMF Emmy Destinn Music Festival, www.festival-ed.cz
August, International Pip Festival Strakonice, www.dudackyfestival.cz; September-October
0: Conservatory and Symphony Orchestra České Budějovice, www.konzervatorcb.cz; Pedagogical
Faculty of South-Bohemian University, Music Education Department, www.pf.jcu.cz; South Bohemian
Theatre, www.jihoceskedivadlo.cz.
E: Agency Do Re Mi, specialized in folk, www.drobek.info; Chamber Philharmonic Orchestra of South
Bohemia, České Budějovice, www.music-cb.cz; Třeboň Pipers/Třeboňští Pištci, ensemble,
www.trebonstipistci.estranky.cz; Třeboň Spa Symphony Orchestra, www.tlso.unas.cz.
SOUTH MORAVIAN REGION (SMR)
František Sušil (1804 Rousínov by Slavkov, SBR–1868 Bystřice pod Hostýnem) folklorist, priest, Leoš
Janáček (1854 Hukvaldy, MSR–Ostrava) composer, living and working since 1865 in Brno, Václav Kaprál
(1889 Určice u Přerova–1947 Brno), composer and choirmaster, Pavel Haas (1899 Brno–1944 Oswieczim,
Poland), Czech composer of Juïf origin, Libuše Domanínská (*1924 Brno) soprano, Josef Berg (1927–71
Brno), avant-garde composer and writer, Alois Simandl Piňos (*1925 Vyškov, SMR-2008 Brno) composer,
Pavel Blatný (*1931 Brno), composer, Miloš Štědroň (*1942 Brno), composer, Fratišek Jílek (1913–93 Brno),
conductor, Magdalena Kožená (*1973 Brno), soprano.
CL: Brno (centre of the region), Moravsko-Slovácko (folklore region), Boskovice, Hodonín, Kyjov, Mikulov,
Moravský Krumlov, Strážnice, Veselí nad Moravou, Slavkov (castle), Znojmo.
F: BRNO
March, IMF Brno – Exposition of New Music, multi-genre festival, www.mhf-brno.cz/enh/
April, IMF Easter Festival of Sacred Music, Brno, www.mhf-brno.cz/vfdh/en
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REGIONAL PANORAMA OF CZECH MUSIC CULTURE
April, IMF Jazz Fest, Brno, www.jazzfestbrno.cz
June, IMF Brno Organ Festival, www.varhany.nomi.cz
June-July, IMF of 13 Towns Concentus Moraviae, www.concentus-moraviae.cz
August, IMF Špilberk, Brno, www.filharmonie-brno.cz
August, International Guitar Festival and Courses, Brno, www.guitarcz.com
September-October, IMF Brno – Moravian Autumn, www.mhf-brno.cz/moravsky-podzim/en
October-December, Etno Brno, www.jazzdoregionu.cz
October-December, Meeting of New Music Plus, Brno/JAMU, http://newmusic.jamu.cz
OTHER LOCALITIES:
June, IFF Strážnice, www.nulk.cz
July, Festival Boskovice, multi-genre festival, www.boskovice-festival.cz
July, Guitar Festival Mikulov, www.gfmikulov.com
July, International Mistřín Folklore Festival, (folklore from Kyjov region),
http://www.folklornisdruzeni.cz/en/international-mistrin-folklore-festival
August, Peter Dvorský IMF, Jaroměřice nad Rokytnou, Vilémov, Telč, Dalešice, opera festival,
www.arskoncert.cz/mhfpd/en;
August, Eurotrialog, festival of alternative music in CR, SR and Austria, Mikulov, www.eurotrialog.cz
O: BRNO
24-7 Promotion Agency, www.24-7promotion.cz; Agency ART (Jiří Švéda),[email protected]; Alterna
Club, www.alterna.cz; ArsKoncert Agency, www.arskoncert.cz; Besední House Brno, house of Brno
Philharmonic Orchestra, www.filharmonie-brno.cz; Barka Theatre, www.barka.unas.cz; Bluegrass Association in CR, www.bacr.cz; Brno Culture Centre, www.kultura-brno.cz; C.E.M.A. – Central European Music
Agency, www.cema-music.com; Club of Moravian Composers, [email protected]; Conservatory Brno,
www.konzervatorbrno.cz; Culture House Rubín, www.kdrubin.cz; Czech Contra Basso Society,
www.csk.xf.cz; Editio Janáček, www.editiojanacek.com; Editio Moravia, www.editiomoravia.cz; Ethnological Institute, Academy of Sciences, Brno working place, http://eu.avcr.cz; I.M.A. Brno, agency of all genres,
www.ima.webzdarma.cz; Indies Production and Indies Records, agency and label of alternative music
www.indiesrec.cz; Janáček Academy of Performing Arts, www.jamu.cz; Janáček Theatre Brno, part of the
National Theatre in Brno, www.ndbrno.cz; L. Janáček Centre, www.janacek-nadace.cz; L. Janáček Foundation, www.janacek-nadace.cz; Lýsek Foundation, www.kotlarska.cz; Institute of European Ethnology,
http://www.phil.muni.cz/wuee/; Institute of Musicology, Philosophical Faculty of Masaryk University,
www.phil.muni.cz/music; International Centre of Slovanian Music Brno, www.concentus-moraviae.cz;
Mahen Theatre, part of the National Theatre in Brno, www.ndbrno.cz; Moravian Land Library Brno, Music
Department, www.mzk.cz; Moravian Land Museum, Music Department, www.mzm.cz; Multi-Art Society,
[email protected]; Opus Musicum, www.opusmusicum.cz; Skleněná Louka/Glass Meadow Club, club for
non-commercial alternative art, www.sklenenalouka.cz; SPKM Agency, www.jazzgoestotown.cz; Stará
Pekárna/Old Bakery Club, www.starapekarna.cz; X Production Agency, agency and label for electro and
hip hop, www.xproduction.cz;
12 Basic Music Schools
E: Academical Choir Association Moravan, www.moravan.funsite.cz; Brass 6, www.brass6.com; Collegium
Musicum Brno, www.cmbrno.com; Czech Chamber Soloists, www.cksbrno.cz; Czech Virtuosi,
www.czechvirtuosi.cz; DAMA DAMA, ensemble of percussions, www.damadama.cz; Ensemble Opera
Diversa, www.operadiversa.cz; Fagoti Brunenses, www.sweb.cz/fagoti; Graffe Quartet, www.graffequartet.
unas.cz; Kantiléna, children´s choir, www.kantilena.cz; La Gambetta, ensemble for Early music,
www.lagambetta.cz; Moravian Quartet, www.moravianquartet.wz.cz; Philharmonic Orchestra Brno,
www.filharmonie-brno.cz; Moravian Teachers Choir Association, www.psmu.cz; Spielberg Quartet,
www.volny.cz/spielberg; The Contemporary A Cappella Society, www.sci.muni.cz/~vaclav/cz-casa01.html;
Wallinger Quartet, http://www.arskoncert.cz/en/umelci/?id=158
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ÚSTÍ NAD LABEM REGION (UNLR)
P: Jan Adam Gallina (1724 Citoliby, UNLR–1773) Baroque composer, Jan Jáchym Kopřiva (1754 Citoliby,
UNLR–1792), Václav Jan Kopřiva (1708 Citoliby, UNLR–1789).
CL: Ústí n. Labem (centre of the region), Cítoliby by Louny (Baroque castle, Early music centre), Chomutov, Krásná Lípa, Litoměřice, Louny, Lovosice, Most, Roudnice, Teplice, Žatec
F: April, International Choir Festival Ústí nad Labem, www.narodnidum-ul.cz/mfsz.php
May-June, IMF L. v. Beethoven Music Festival, Teplice, Ústí and other localities of the region,
www.severoceskafilharmonie.cz;
June, IJF Litvínov, www.jazzfestlitvinov.cz
June, IFF Tolštejn Dominion, Krásná Lípa,
http://www.folklornisdruzeni.cz/v-mezinarodni-folklorni-festival-tolstejnskeho-panstvi-v-krasne-lipe
June, Porta, IMF of country&western and folk music, Ústí nad Labem, www.porta-festival.cz
June, Altros, Rockfest Lovosice, http://altrosrock.info
June-July, IMF Mitte Europe, www.festival-mitte-europa.com
November, Virtuosi per musica di pianoforte, Ústí nad Labem, www.zuserandove.cz/virtuosi
O: Conservatory Teplice, www.konzervatorteplice.cz; Culture Centre Ústí nad Labem,
www.narodnidum-ul.cz; Culture House Teplice, www.dkteplice.cz; Jazz Club Teplice, www.jazzteplice.cz;
North-Bohemian Culture Agency, www.sweb.cz/agentura-samek; North-Bohemian Opera and Ballet
Theatre Ústí nad Labem, www.operabalet.cz; North-Bohemian Science Library Ústí nad Labem, Music
Department, www.svkul.cz; Pedagogical Faculty of University of J. E. Purkyně Ústí nad Labem, Music
Department, http://pf1.ujep.cz/KHV.
E: Folklore ensemble Krušnohor, Chomutov, www.krusnohor.org; Orchestra of City Theatre, Ústí nad Labem,
www.operabalet.cz; North-Bohemian Philharmonic Orchestra Teplice, www.severoceskafilharmonie.cz
VYSOČINA REGION (VR)
P: František Václav Míča (1694 Třebíč, VR–1744 Jaroměřice, VR), Baroque composer, Jan Václav Stamic
(1717 Havlíčkův Brod, VR–1757 Manheim), Classicist composer of s.c. Manheim School, Vincent KramářKrommer (1759 Kamenice by Třebíč, VR -1831 Vienna) composer and violinist, Gustav Mahler (1860 Kaliště,
VR–1911 Vienna), Austrian composer and conductor of Czech origin, Vítězslav Novák (1870 Kamenice nad
Lipou, VR –1949 Skuteč), composer and folklorist, Miroslav Venhoda (1915 Moravské Budějovice, VR–1987
Prague).
CL: Jihlava (centre of the region), Havlíčkův Brod, Jaroměřice (Baroque castle), Lipnice, Moravské Budějovice, Náměšť nad Oslavou (Baroque castle), Polná, Třebíč (historical city and folklore centre),
Folklore regions: Kyjov region, Myjava, Strážnicko, Horňácko,Valašsko/Vallachia, Rožnovsko, Podhorácko
F: June, IMF of 13 Towns Concentus-Moraviae, www.concentus-moraviae.cz
June, Zámostí Třebíč, open-air festival, www.zamosti.cz
June/July, Festival Rock Lipnice, www.rockovalipnice.cz
July, Folk Holidays, Náměšť nad Oslavou, www.folkoveprazdniny.cz
August, Czech Rock block, open air festival, Jihlava, Plasy, www.spv.cz/crb_cms
September, IMF Mahler-Jihlava, www.mahler2000.cz;
O: Culture House Jihlava, www.dko.cz.
E: Chamber Philharmonic Orchestra Vysočina, www.kfv.cz
66
LINKS (SELECTION)
ZLÍN REGION
P: Pavel Josef Vejvanovský (1639 Hukvaldy or Hlučín-1693 Kroměříž, ZR) composer and trumpetist,
František Xaver Richter (1709 Holešov na Moravě, ZR -1789 Strassbourg), composer, violinist working in
Manheim, František Sušil, (1804 Rousínov by Slavkov, ZR-1868 Bystřice pd Hostýnem), important folklorist,
Břetislav Bakala (1897 Fryšták by Holešov, ZR-1958),conductor, Alois Hába (1898 Vizovice, ZR-1972 Prague), composer and violist, Rudolf Firkušný (1912 Napajedla, ZR-94 New York), pianist.
CL: Zlín (centre of the region), Bystřice pod Hostýnem (folklore region), Kroměříž (castle), Luhačovice
(spa), Rožnov pod Radhoštěm (folklore region), Uherský Brod (folklore region), Valašské Meziřící
F: May, IMF Talentinum, festival for young interpreters, www.filharmonie-zlin.cz
June, Forferst Festival, festival of contemporary spiritual art, www.forfest.cz
June-August, Music in the Gardens and Chateau Kroměříž, www.unesco-kromeriz.cz
July, IFF in Bystřice pod Hostýnem, www.fos.cz
July, IFF Rožnov Festivities, Rožnov pod Radhoštěm, www.folklornisdruzeni.cz/maff-roznovska-valaska
August; IFF Liptál Celebrations, www.folklornisdruzeni.cz/detsky-festival
September/October, festival Harmonia Moraviae, www.filharmonie-zlin.cz
O: House of Arts, Zlín, www.filharmonie-zlin.cz; Ecclesiastical Conservatory in Kroměříž, www.ckonz.cz;
P. J. Vejvanovský Conservatory Kroměříž, www.konzkm.cz
E: B. Martinů Philharmonic Orchestra, www.filharmonie-zlin.cz; Big Brass Orchestra Zlín,
www.vdozlin.cz; Chamber Choir Dvořák, Zlín, www.dvorak.zlin.cz; Chamber Church Choir, Uherský Brod,
chramovysbor-ub.webnode.cz; Moravian Madrigalists Kroměříž, www.madrigaliste.cz.
CZECH MUSIC GUIDE
LINKS
(SELECTION)
67
GENERAL PORTALS AND WEBS
www.culturenet.cz
Portal and web for Czech professional art (CZ/EN)
www.czechmusic.org
Portal and web for Czech classical and pop music
- personalities, festivals, organisations, links
(CZ/EN)
www.czechmusic.net
Web especially for Czech and Slovak pop music,
partly for classical music (CZ/EN)
www.musica.cz
Portal and web of Czech MIC, specialised especially in promotion of Czech classical contemporary
music (CZ/EN)
www.boosey.com
Portal of BOOSEY & HAWKES, catalogue of
contemporary world music including Czech music
(EN)
www.wikipedia.org
Free Internet encyclopaedia involved also information about Czech music (EN)
Folklore
www.fos.cz
Portal of FOLKLORE ASSOCIATION OF THE CR
(CZ/EN/GER/FR/PL/RU)
www.folklor.cz
Portal for Czech folklore activities and ensembles.
(CZ/EN/GER/PL)
Opera
www.operabase.com
Portal of world opera including Czech music (EN)
www.operissimo.com
Portal of world opera including Czech music (EN)
www.theatre.cz
Portal for Czech theatre (CZ/EN)
Jazz
www.allaboutjazz.com
Portal of jazz including jazz in CR (EN)
www.jazzport.cz
Portal of jazz music in CR (CZ/EN)
Folk
www.casopisfolk.cz
Portal of Czech folk & country (CZ/EN)
68
LINKS (SELECTION)
Only in Czech version
www.hudebniportal.com
General music portal for classical music, jazz, pop
and rock music, without redaction (CZ)
www.caramba.cz
Portal including a list of Czech music institutions,
festivals etc, without redaction (CZ)
www.cojeco.cz
Portal What-is What, partly in English (CZ)
www.muzikus.cz/muzikontakt/
Extensive database of music organisations, festivals, bodies and figures in the branch of Czech
music (CZ)
www.musicologica.cz
Czech music dictionary (CZ), well-developed
www.play.cz/radia-online
Portal and web for Czech radio, world radio, online TV/video, radio in iPhone (CZ)
www.wikipedia.cz
Czech version of free international encyclopaedia
(CZ).
www.zivotopisyonline.cz
Biographies of Czech figures including musicians
(CZ).
INSTITUTIONS
Czech opera, opereta, musical and
ballet houses
PRAHA
www.narodni-divadlo.cz
NATIONAL THEATRE PRAGUE (CZ/EN/GER)
www.opera.cz
STATE OPERA PRAGUE (CZ/EN/GER)
www.laterna.cz
LATERNA MAGICA Theatre (CZ/EN/GER/IT)
www.hdk.cz
MUSIC THEATRE KARLÍN (CZ)
www.divadlo-broadway.cz
MUSICAL THEATRE (CZ) Hybernská 1, Prague 1
www.hybernia.eu
MUSIC THEATRE HYBERNIA (CZ/EN/GER)
www.detskaoperapraha.cz
CHILDREN´S OPERA PRAGUE (CZ/EN/GER/IT)
BRNO
www.ndbrno.cz
NATIONAL THEATRE IN BRNO (CZ/GER)
www.mdb.cz
MUNICIPAL THEATRE BRNO with new
CONTEMPORARY MODERN SCENE for musicals
www.operadiversa.cz
ENSEMBLE OPERA DIVERSA (CZ/EN)
ČESKÉ BUDĚJOVICE
www.jihoceskedivadlo.cz
SOUTH BOHEMIAN THEATRE ČESKÉ BUDĚJOVICE (CZ/EN/GER)
LIBEREC
www.saldovo-divadlo.cz
ŠALDA THEATRE LIBEREC (CZ/GER)
OLOMOUC
www.moravskedivadlo.cz
MORAVIAN THEATRE OLOMOUC (CZ)
OPAVA
www.divadlo-opava.cz
SILESIAN THEATRE OPAVA (CZ)
OSTRAVA
www.ndm.cz
NATIONAL MORAVIAN-SILESIAN THEATRE
OSTRAVA (CZ/EN)
PILSEN
www.djkt-plzen.cz
J. K. TYL THEATRE PILSEN (CZ/EN/GER)
ÚSTÍ NAD LABEM
www.operabalet.cz
NORTH BOHEMIAN OPERA AND BALLET
THEATRE ÚSTÍ NAD LABEM (CZ/EN/GER)
Orchestras and choirs
www.sbor.cz
Czech and Slovak choral community portal
(CZ/SK)
www.upcs.cz
CZECH CHOIRS UNION (CZ)
PRAHA
www.ceskafilharmonie.cz
CZECH PHILHARMONIC ORCHESTRA (CZ/EN)
www.pkf.cz
PRAGUE PHILHARMONIA (CZ/EN)
www.rozhlas.cz/socr
PRAGUE RADIO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA
(CZ/EN)
www.fok.cz
PRAGUE SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA (CZ/EN)
www.cnso.cz
CZECH NATIONAL SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA
(CZ/EN)
www.prgcons.cz
PRAGUE CONSERVATORY SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA (CZ/EN)
www.choir.cz
PRAGUE PHILHARMONIC CHOIR (CZ/EN)
CZECH MUSIC GUIDE
www.prazskykomornisbor.cz
PRAGUE CHAMBER CHOIR (CZ/EN)
www.kuhnata.cz
PRAGUE PHILHARMONIC CHILDREN’S CHOIR /
KÜHN’S CHILDREN’S CHOIR (CZ/EN/GER/FR/IT/
ESP)
BRNO
www.filharmonie-brno.cz
BRNO PHILHARMONIC ORCHESTRA (CZ/EN)
www.choirphilharmonic.cz
BRNO CZECH PHILHARMONIC CHOIR OF BRNO
(CZ/EN/GER)
www.bfsbb.cz
BRNO PHILHARMONIC CHOIR—CZECH REPUBLIC (CZ/EN)
www.psmu.cz
CHORAL SOCIETY OF MORAVIAN TEACHERS
(CZ/EN)
ČESKÉ BUDĚJOVICE
www.music-cb.cz
SOUTH BOHEMIAN CHAMBER PHILHARMONIC
ORCHESTRA (CZ/EN/GER)
HRADEC KRÁLOVÉ
www.fhk.cz
PHILHARMONIC ORCHESTRA HRADEC KRÁLOVÉ (CZ/EN)
www.bonipueri.cz
CZECH BOYS CHOIR BONI PUERI (CZ/EN)
KARLOVY VARY
kso.kso.cz
KARLOVY VARY SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA
(CZ/EN/GER)
69
PARDUBICE
www.kfpar.cz
CZECH CHAMBER PHILHARMONIC ORCHESTRA
PARDUBICE (CZ/EN)
PILSEN
www.plzenskafilharmonie.cz
PILSEN PHILHARMONIC ORCHESTRA
www.novaceskapisen.cz
NEW CZECH SONG MIXED CHOIR PILSEN (CZ)
ZLÍN
www.filharmoniezlin.cz
BOHUSLAV MARTINŮ PHILHARMONIC
ORCHESTRA (CZ/EN)
FESTIVALS AND COMPETITIONS IN CR
www.czech-festivals.cz
THE CZECH ASSOCIATION OF MUSIC FESTIVALS
(CZ/EN/GER)
www.bacr.cz
BLUEGRASS ASSOCIATION CR, links to some
Czech bluegrass, folk and country festivals
(CZ/EN)
www.fos.cz
Portal of Folklore Association of the CR with link
to folklore festivals
(CZ/EN/GER/FR/PL/RU)
www.unijazz.cz
Jazz web-portal with links to some jazz festivals
e.g. BOSKOVICE FESTIVAL, BOHNICE FESTIVAL,
ALTERNATIVA FESTIVAL PRAGUE (CZ/EN)
International festivals in many localities
LIBEREC
www.severacek.cz
SEVERÁČEK CHILDREN CHOIR (CZ/EN)
MARIÁNSKÉ LÁZNĚ
www.zso.cz
WEST BOHEMIAN SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA
MARIÁNSKÉ LÁZNĚ (CZ/EN/GER)
OLOMOUC
www.mfo.cz
MORAVIAN PHILHARMONIC OLOMOUC
(CZ/EN)
www.zerotin.cz
ACADEMIC CHOIR ZEROTIN (CZ/EN/GER)
OSTRAVA
www.jfo.cz
JANÁČEK PHILHARMONIC ORCHESTRA
OSTRAVA (CZ/EN/GER)
www.casopisfolk.cz/zahrada.htm
GARDEN, festival of folk music (CZ)
www.ceske-kulturni-slavnosti.cz
CZECH CULTURE FESTIVITIES, festival of classical
music (CZ/EN)
www.concentus-moraviae.cz
CONCENTUS MORAVIAE, IMF of Thirteen Towns
(CZ/EN/GER)
www.europalia.be
EROPALIA—Biennial Festival of Arts and Culture
(FR/NL/EN)
www.europamusicale.com
EUROPAMUSICALE (EN/GER)
www.festival-mitte-europa.com
FESTIVAL MITTE EUROPA (CZ/EN/GER/FR)
www.folklornifestival.cz
FOLKLORE FESTIVAL PARDUBICE – HRADEC
KRÁLOVÉ (CZ)
70
LINKS (SELECTION)
www.inegal.cz
CZECH ORGAN FESTIVAL (CZ/EN/GER/ESP/FR)
www.porta-festival.cz
PORTA, IMF festival of country and folk music
(CZ)
www.shf.cz
ST. WENCESLAS MUSIC FESTIVAL, in 19 Cities of
Moravian-Silesian Region (CZ)
www.svatovaclavske.cz
ST. WENCESLAS FESTIVITIES (CZ/EN)
PRAHA/PRAGUE
www.agharta.cz
AGHARTA PRAGUE JAZZ FESTIVAL (CZ/EN)
www.ahuv.cz
MF DAYS OF CONTEMPORARY MUSIC (CZ)
www.ameropa.org
AMEROPA—IF and Courses of Chamber Music
(only EN)
http://atelier.webzdarma.cz
MF TŘÍDENÍ (CZ)
www.auditeorganum.cz
INTERNATIONAL ORGAN FESTIVAL (CZ/EN)
AUTUMN ORGAN MONDAYS PRAGUE (CZ/EN)
for Young Musicians Concertino Praga
www.ceskedotekyhudby.cz
A TOUCH OF CZECH MUSIC (CZ/EN/GER)
www.concert-melodrama.com
IF OF CONCERT MELODRAMA PRAGUE
(CZ/EN/GER)
www.contempuls.cz
CONTEMPULS Prague Contemporary Music
Festival (CZ/EN)
www.euroart.cz
EUROART PRAGUE FESTIVAL (CZ/EN)
www.festival.cz
IMF PRAGUE SPRING (CZ/EN/GER)
festival.musictheatre.cz
AD HONOREM MOZART – PRAGA (CZ/EN)
www.jazzfestivalpraha.cz
INTERNATIONAL JAZZ FESTIVAL PRAGUE
(CZ/EN)
www.letnislavnosti.cz
EARLY M USIC FESTIVAL (CZ/EN)
www.pragueproms.cz
PRAGUE PROMS (CZ/EN)
www.festival.cz
PRAGUE SPRING IMF (CZ/EN)
www.rozhlasovypodzim.cz
IMF RADIO AUTUMN (CZ/EN)
www.strunypodzimu.cz
IMF STRINGS OF AUTUMN (CZ/EN)
www.stimul-festival.cz
CONTINUOUS FESTIVAL OF ALTERNATIVE
MUSIC (CZ/PL/EN)
www.rozhlas.cz/concertino
CONCERTINO PRAGA-International Radio
Competition
www.ceskyslavik.cz
CZECH NIGHTINGALE, competition of pop music
(CZ)
musicanova.seah.cz
IC MUSICA NOVA (CZ/EN)
www.unijazz.cz
IMF ALTERNATIVA (CZ/EN)
www.unitedislands.cz
UNITED ISLANDS Prague IMF (CZ/EN)
BRNO
www.filharmonie-brno.cz
IMF ŠPILBERK (CZ/EN)
www.guitarcz.com
INTERNATIONAL GUITAR FESTIVAL AND
COURSES (CZ/EN)
www.mhf-brno.cz
BRNO IMF (CZ/EN)
www.mhf-brno.cz/enh
BRNO IMF/EXPOSITION OF NEW MUSIC (CZ/EN)
www.mhf-brno.cz/vfdh/cz
BRNO IMF/EASTER FESTIVAL OF SACRED MUSIC
(CZ/EN)
www.mhf-brno.cz/moravsky-podzim/cz
BRNO IMF/MORAVIAN AUTUMN (CZ/EN)
www.jazzdoregionu.cz
JAZZ TO THE REGION—web-portal with links
to some jazz festivals e.g. Alternativa Brno, Jazz
Brno, Etno Brno (only CZ)
www.mhf-brno.cz/mis/cz
BRNO IMF/INTERNATIONAL PERFORMERS
COMPETITION (CZ/EN)
www.folklorenet.cz/mff
INTERNATIONAL FOLKLORE FESTIVAL BRNO
(CZ/EN)
ČESKÁ LÍPA
www.lipamusica.cz
IMF LÍPA MUSICA (CZ/EN/GER)
ČESKÉ BUDĚJOVICE
www.festival-ed.cz
EMMY DESTINN MUSIC FESTIVAL (CZ/EN)
ČESKÝ KRUMLOV
www.festivalkrumlov.cz
IMF ČESKÝ KRUMLOV (CZ/EN)
www.jazzkykrumlov.cz
JAZZ IN LATE SUMMER ČESKÝ KRUMLOV
(CZ/EN)
HUKVALDY
www.janackovyhukvaldy.cz
IMF JANÁČEK HUKVALDY (CZ/EN)
CZECH MUSIC GUIDE
HRADEC KRÁLOVÉ
www.jazzgoestotown.com
JAZZ GOES TO TOWN—Jazz Festival (CZ)
www.rockforpeople.cz
ROCK FOR PEOPLE FESTIVAL (CZ/EN/GER/POL)
www.sboroveslavnosti.cz
HRADEC KRÁLOVÉ CHOIR SINGING FESTIVAL
(CZ/EN)
HRADEC NAD MORAVICÍ
www.ritornel.com/beethoven
BEETHOVEN´S HRADEC COMPETITION (CZ/EN)
CHEB
www.fijo.cz
FIJO CHEB—IF of Youth Wind Orchestras (CZ/EN/
GER/FR)
JIHLAVA
www.fsujihlava.com
FESTIVAL OF INTERNATIONAL CHORAL ART
JIHLAVA (CZ/EN)
www.porta-festival.cz
PORTA—Folk and Country Music (CZ)
KARLOVY VARY
www.jazzfest.cz
JAZZFEST KARLOVY VARY – SOKOLOV
(CZ/EN/GER)
KUTNÁ HORA
www.mfkh.cz
IMF KUTNÁ HORA (CZ/EN)
LIBEREC
www.bohemiacantat.cz
BOHEMIA CANTAT LIBEREC—INTERNATIONAL
CHORAL FESTIVAL (CZ/EN/GER)
LITOMYŠL
www.hudebnimladez.cz/litomysl
YOUNG SMETANA‘S LITOMYŠL/F of the Musical
Youth CR (CZ/EN)
www.smetanovalitomysl.cz
SMETANA´S LITOMYŠL International Opera
Festival (CZ/EN/GER)
LUHAČOVICE
lazneluhacovice.cz/janacek
IMF JANÁČEK AND LUHAČOVICE (CZ/EN/GER)
MARIÁNSKÉ LÁZNĚ
www.chopinfestival.cz
CHOPIN PIANO IC (CZ/EN/GER)
71
MIKULOV
www.campanila.com
KAMPANILA INTERNATIONAL CHOIR MUSIC
(CZ/EN)
www.eurotrialog.cz
EUROTRIALOG MIKULOV (CZ/EN)
NOVÁ PAKA
muzikapaka.open-art.cz
MUZIKA PAKA – OPEN ART FESTIVAL (CZ)
OLOMOUC
www.festamusicale.cz
FESTIVAL OF SONGS OLOMOUC (CZ/EN)
www.mfo.cz/varfest.html
INTERNATIONAL ORGAN FESTIVAL OLOMOUC
(CZ/EN)
IMF DVOŘÁK´S OLOMOUC (CZ)
www.musicolomouc.cz
MUSICOLOMOUC – IF OF CONTEMPORARY
MUSIC (CZ/EN)
OSTRAVA
www.colours.cz
COLOURS OF OSTRAVA (CZ/PL/EN)
www.janackuvmaj.cz
IMF JANÁČEK MAY (CZ/EN)
www.newmusicostrava.cz
OSTRAVA DAYS/SUMMER INSTITUTE FOR
COMPOSERS AND PERFORMERS (EN)
PARDUBICE
www.ifas.cz
IF OF ACADEMIC CHOIRS IFAS PARDUBICE
(CZ/EN/RUS/GER)
PILSEN
www.piano-competition.com
SMETANA PIANO IC (CZ/EN)
www.mffplzen.eu
IFF PILSEN (CZ/EN)
www.smetanovskedny.cz
SMETANA’S DAYS (CZ/EN)
POLIČKA
www.tyluvdum.cz
MARTINŮ FEST (CZ)
PŘEROV
www.csjf.cz
CZECHOSLOVAK JAZZ FESTIVAL PŘEROV (CZ)
STRÁŽ NAD NEŽÁRKOU
www.destinn.com
EMMY DESTINN YOUNG SINGERS AWARDS (EN)
72
LINKS (SELECTION)
STRÁŽNICE
www.nulk.cz
IFF STRÁŽNICE (CZ/EN/GER)
TEPLICE
www.severoceskafilharmonie.cz
LUDWIG VAN BEETHOVEN MUSIC FESTIVAL
(CZ/EN/GER)
ÚSTÍ NAD LABEM
www.narodnidum-ul.cz/jazz.php
INTERNATIONAL JAZZ & BLUES FESTIVAL (CZ)
ÚSTÍ NAD ORLICÍ
www.khs.cz
KOCIAN VIOLIN COMPETITION ÚSTÍ NAD ORLICÍ
(CZ/EN)
ZLÍN
www.filharmoniezlin.cz
TALENTINUM—IF for Young Performers (CZ/EN)
www.forfest.cz
Festival FORFEST—International Festival of Contemporary Arts with Spiritual Orientation (CZ/EN)
ZNOJMO
www.hudbaznojmo.cz
ZNOJMO MUSIC FESTIVAL (CZ/EN/GER)
A NEW WAY
TO NAVIGATE THROUGH
THE CZECH ARTS
TRYING TO NAVIGATE THE TERRAIN OF CONTEMPORARY
CZECH ARTS? SET OFF ON YOUR JOURNEY WITH THE
TRUSTY NEW GUIDES THAT THE ARTS AND THEATRE
INSTITUTE PREPARED FOR YOU
CZECH
DANCE / THEATRE / LITERATURE / MUSIC
GUIDE
IN EACH GUIDE YOU’LL FIND:
●
●
●
●
●
●
A SHORT HISTORY OF THE FIELD
INFORMATION ON CURRENT EVENTS AND HIGHLIGHTS
A DIRECTORY OF PEOPLE, INSTITUTIONS, SCHOOLS,
ORGANISATIONS, AND ARTS BODIES
EVENTS AND FESTIVALS
AWARDS
ADDITIONAL USEFUL INFORMATION AND LINKS
FOLLOW US ALSO ON OUR INFORMATION PORTALS:
THE WEBSITE OF THE ARTS AND THEATRE INSTITUTE WWW.IDU.CZ
THE CZECH THEATRE INFORMATION PORTAL WWW.THEATRE.CZ
THE CZECH LITERATURE INFORMATION PORTAL WWW.CZECHLIT.CZ
THE CZECH MUSIC INFORMATION PORTAL WWW.CZECHMUSIC.ORG
THE GUIDES CAN BE
ORDERED FROM:
E-SHOP PROSPERO
HTTP://PROSPERO.DIVADLO.CZ
ARTS AND THEATRE INSTITUTE
BARBORA PEROUTKOVÁ
CELETNÁ 17
PRAGUE 1,
T: 224 809 137
E: [email protected]
CZECH MUSIC GUIDE
Author:
Lenka Dohnalová
Revision:
Jindřich Bajgar
Jiří Starý
Petr Slabý
Translation:
Lenka Dohnalová
revision: Anna Bryson, Eliška Hulcová
Design:
Studio Colmo
Photos:
used in the publication:
Archives of Arts and Theatre Institute,
Czech Music Museum, Music Information Centre,
Pop Museum and agencies archives.
Supported by: Ministry of Culture Czech Republic
© 2011 Arts and Theatre Institute
Celetná 17
CZ-110 00 Praha 1
E [email protected]
www.idu.cz
www.czechmusic.org
second modified edition
ISBN 978-80-7008-269-0
as its 625th publication
CZECH
MUSIC
GUIDE
www.czechmusic.org
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CZECH MUSIC GUIDE